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peterrocket1,369 posts since 5 Sep 2001
It's so odd to introduce a celebrity version of an established show but change something as established as the theme tune.


Didn't Simon say he was going to change it because he didn't like it?

Edit: Ahh yes - https://metro.co.uk/2019/07/14/simon-cowell-scrap-x-factor-theme-song-one-worst-ever-heard-10286273/

In fairness, when they've promised change before, it's generally ended up being nothing major so wouldn't get the hopes up.
all new Phil3,265 posts since 12 Feb 2005
Granada North West Today
Most changes end up getting reversed as if they never happened in the first place - see Louis’ constant departures and returns, the top 2 sing-off, the flash vote etc etc. It seems like every other year is “back to basics” after changes the previous year.
I love lamp
2
DJ Dave and Brekkie gave kudos
JKDerry1,905 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
Most changes end up getting reversed as if they never happened in the first place - see Louis’ constant departures and returns, the top 2 sing-off, the flash vote etc etc. It seems like every other year is “back to basics” after changes the previous year.

Well they can not do any thing else, the ratings are always now in the toilet - just look at BGT against the first live Strictly on Saturday, yes Strictly took a knock, but BGT not scraping 4 million viewers, wow!
Square Eyes7,758 posts since 31 Mar 2001
If (and that's a big if) The Masked Singer is successful, I can see it being a XF replacement in the Autumn. It's a much more fun show and the mood now is for feel good rather than high stakes and drama.

I honestly don't think there is the audience for another civilian X Factor again, it's gone the way of Big Brother.
2
Cando and Brekkie gave kudos
all new Phil3,265 posts since 12 Feb 2005
Granada North West Today
X Factor has lost more and more viewers the more they tried to cast certain types of characters. The show’s peak, in 2010, featured a perfect mix of contestants that happened completely by accident - Wagner, 1D, Katie Waissel, Matt Cardle etc. They’ve spent every year since trying to recreate that (particularly trying to find another Wagner). Honey G was the moment the show jumped the shark.

They need to rest it, and come back in 3 or 4 years with much less manipulation. Let things happen organically rather than trying to engineer everything!

Ironically, Strictly changes absolutely sod all and still gets the viewers.
I love lamp
1
DeMarkay gave kudos
JKDerry1,905 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
Strictly started off as the underdog - X Factor always trounced it in ratings for the early seasons. For me, it seems when Strictly moved into Elstree in 2013, the whole feel of Strictly changed for the better and it was from that point on that Strictly started to overtake X Factor in the ratings.

Strictly follow the concept of if it aint broke don't fix it. The BBC know the format works, they know it attracts a family audience, and creates a lot of publicity, especially with the so called "Strictly Curse".
Whataday10,134 posts since 13 Sep 2001
HTV Wales Wales Today
X Factor has lost more and more viewers the more they tried to cast certain types of characters. The show’s peak, in 2010, featured a perfect mix of contestants that happened completely by accident - Wagner, 1D, Katie Waissel, Matt Cardle etc. They’ve spent every year since trying to recreate that (particularly trying to find another Wagner). Honey G was the moment the show jumped the shark.


I know 2010 was the peak but that year's success owed a lot to the previous year. 2009 had Beyonce in the final, Whitney mentoring the acts, JLS, Alexandra Burke etc. And if anything Wagner was 2010's answer to Jedward.

With X Factor you can tell the production is led by a record label rather than a television production company. When a record label promotes an artist, they create hype, get attention and sell a record. If the artist hits big they'll take it globally, try and crack the States and usually take their eye off the ball elsewhere, but sometimes the gamble pays off. Either way, eventually when that artist becomes stale, they either drop them or reinvent their brand, style of music etc. There's very little heart involved, not much warmth. It's a production line. That's how they've treated the show. They've dropped talent, tried to reinvent, tried dramatic comebacks. It's pure record industry fodder. But it doesn't suit television. Television (particularly British television) needs far more heart in order for people to have that loyalty and connection.

Before Leona Lewis went to No1 in the states, X Factor was a very different animal. It was a talent show hosted by a former Smash Hits editor that looked for an every day Joe, a builder, a hairdresser or office worker, and tried to find star quality that could make someone a successful popstar. It was very unassuming, low key and we were invested in the contestants to see whether they'd make it big or not. We were in charge, and we would vote for who we wanted to win. Hopefully they'd get a number one in the UK, and that would be great. After each performance the audience would clap, sometimes cheer, and sit in silence eager to see what the judges would say. Post-Leona, the programme set itself a new benchmark. X Factor TOLD us it was going to make a global superstar, and in order to do that it was inevitably going to have to manipulate things in order to give Syco the best shot of huge success. The fanfares got more and more ridiculous, and the studio audience were whipped up into such a frenzy to the point that it felt like the second coming. We were basically told who we should like, and anyone that didn't conform was written off as middle of the road cabaret singers. The judges, once respected for their opinions started making decisions in line with the show's agenda, not that of the public.

It went from a fairly humble show grateful for the public's role in choosing the winner, to an arrogant beast that told us who was best. And even if we didn't do as we were told and we voted someone else as our winner, they'd ignore us and make the runner up the true winner anyway. And that works when you're at peak success, but when you hit a peak, the only way is down.
1
ManicPumpkin gave kudos
BM111,056 posts since 2 Jun 2017
London London
X Factor has lost more and more viewers the more they tried to cast certain types of characters. The show’s peak, in 2010, featured a perfect mix of contestants that happened completely by accident - Wagner, 1D, Katie Waissel, Matt Cardle etc. They’ve spent every year since trying to recreate that (particularly trying to find another Wagner). Honey G was the moment the show jumped the shark.


I know 2010 was the peak but that year's success owed a lot to the previous year. 2009 had Beyonce in the final, Whitney mentoring the acts, JLS, Alexandra Burke etc. And if anything Wagner was 2010's answer to Jedward.

With X Factor you can tell the production is led by a record label rather than a television production company. When a record label promotes an artist, they create hype, get attention and sell a record. If the artist hits big they'll take it globally, try and crack the States and usually take their eye off the ball elsewhere, but sometimes the gamble pays off. Either way, eventually when that artist becomes stale, they either drop them or reinvent their brand, style of music etc. There's very little heart involved, not much warmth. It's a production line. That's how they've treated the show. They've dropped talent, tried to reinvent, tried dramatic comebacks. It's pure record industry fodder. But it doesn't suit television. Television (particularly British television) needs far more heart in order for people to have that loyalty and connection.

Before Leona Lewis went to No1 in the states, X Factor was a very different animal. It was a talent show hosted by a former Smash Hits editor that looked for an every day Joe, a builder, a hairdresser or office worker, and tried to find star quality that could make someone a successful popstar. It was very unassuming, low key and we were invested in the contestants to see whether they'd make it big or not. We were in charge, and we would vote for who we wanted to win. Hopefully they'd get a number one in the UK, and that would be great. After each performance the audience would clap, sometimes cheer, and sit in silence eager to see what the judges would say. Post-Leona, the programme set itself a new benchmark. X Factor TOLD us it was going to make a global superstar, and in order to do that it was inevitably going to have to manipulate things in order to give Syco the best shot of huge success. The fanfares got more and more ridiculous, and the studio audience were whipped up into such a frenzy to the point that it felt like the second coming. We were basically told who we should like, and anyone that didn't conform was written off as middle of the road cabaret singers. The judges, once respected for their opinions started making decisions in line with the show's agenda, not that of the public.

It went from a fairly humble show grateful for the public's role in choosing the winner, to an arrogant beast that told us who was best. And even if we didn't do as we were told and we voted someone else as our winner, they'd ignore us and make the runner up the true winner anyway. And that works when you're at peak success, but when you hit a peak, the only way is down.

All that was 2008.
Jon7,996 posts since 11 Apr 2005
Central (West) Midlands Today
X Factor has lost more and more viewers the more they tried to cast certain types of characters. The show’s peak, in 2010, featured a perfect mix of contestants that happened completely by accident - Wagner, 1D, Katie Waissel, Matt Cardle etc. They’ve spent every year since trying to recreate that (particularly trying to find another Wagner). Honey G was the moment the show jumped the shark.


I know 2010 was the peak but that year's success owed a lot to the previous year. 2009 had Beyonce in the final, Whitney mentoring the acts, JLS, Alexandra Burke etc. And if anything Wagner was 2010's answer to Jedward.

With X Factor you can tell the production is led by a record label rather than a television production company. When a record label promotes an artist, they create hype, get attention and sell a record. If the artist hits big they'll take it globally, try and crack the States and usually take their eye off the ball elsewhere, but sometimes the gamble pays off. Either way, eventually when that artist becomes stale, they either drop them or reinvent their brand, style of music etc. There's very little heart involved, not much warmth. It's a production line. That's how they've treated the show. They've dropped talent, tried to reinvent, tried dramatic comebacks. It's pure record industry fodder. But it doesn't suit television. Television (particularly British television) needs far more heart in order for people to have that loyalty and connection.

Before Leona Lewis went to No1 in the states, X Factor was a very different animal. It was a talent show hosted by a former Smash Hits editor that looked for an every day Joe, a builder, a hairdresser or office worker, and tried to find star quality that could make someone a successful popstar. It was very unassuming, low key and we were invested in the contestants to see whether they'd make it big or not. We were in charge, and we would vote for who we wanted to win. Hopefully they'd get a number one in the UK, and that would be great. After each performance the audience would clap, sometimes cheer, and sit in silence eager to see what the judges would say. Post-Leona, the programme set itself a new benchmark. X Factor TOLD us it was going to make a global superstar, and in order to do that it was inevitably going to have to manipulate things in order to give Syco the best shot of huge success. The fanfares got more and more ridiculous, and the studio audience were whipped up into such a frenzy to the point that it felt like the second coming. We were basically told who we should like, and anyone that didn't conform was written off as middle of the road cabaret singers. The judges, once respected for their opinions started making decisions in line with the show's agenda, not that of the public.

It went from a fairly humble show grateful for the public's role in choosing the winner, to an arrogant beast that told us who was best. And even if we didn't do as we were told and we voted someone else as our winner, they'd ignore us and make the runner up the true winner anyway. And that works when you're at peak success, but when you hit a peak, the only way is down.

All that was 2008.

Hardly worth the massive quote for correcting someone’s minor mistake.
1
Larry the Loafer gave kudos