« Topics
1234
Markymark5,890 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Most people under 30 now would be baffled by there being "outrage" over not having two versions of ITV but it genuinely did give you an extra viewing option for significant periods of the day (typically weekday afternoons, late night and weekend afternoons) and in a way provided a +1/catch up service long before they were even thought about thanks to different regions showing the same shows at different times.


We had three ITV regions at home, London, Southern, and Midlands Smile

The time-shift thing was really handy (particularly pre VCRs)
There were programmes that I would not have seen with just one region

Fireball XL5 (ATV only)
WKPR Cincinatti (ATV/Central only)
Tiswas (early series) ATV only,
The Time Tunnel (Thames only)
Foreign Language movies (Southern only)
Saturday Scene and 'Our Show' (LWT only, later Southern too I think)
1
ClarkToasti gave kudos
Markymark5,890 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
How quickly did the regions make it on to Sky. I think some sub-regions have only appeared quite recently, but I assume initially it was a similar situation to the HD and +1 rollout with only the major regions rolled out initially.


All the primary regions were there from day one, including HTV West and Wales, and Border Eng and Scotland

http://www.lpilsley.co.uk/skyitv.htm

Also confirms noggin's point. ITV 1 was FTV, ITV 2 was subs only
russty_russ85 posts since 17 Feb 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
We all grew up wanting to tune in the different ITV regions when atmospherics gave you the chance and then when it was possible via the add channels on Sky, it wasn't that much long when the majority of the ITV regions would have generic branding.

On a slightly different note, I remember around this time, you could push the red button when the local news was on the BBC and you was able to watch the local news in 3 different regions. Anyone else remember or is it me going mad again?
Steve Williams2,447 posts since 1 Aug 2008
On a slightly different note, I remember around this time, you could push the red button when the local news was on the BBC and you was able to watch the local news in 3 different regions. Anyone else remember or is it me going mad again?


Yes, before the BBC1 regions were available on satellite, for a while - a year or so? - they came up with a compromise when the four biggest regions outside London - West Midlands, North West, Yorkshire and South - were on the red button, so you could watch them via that method. Then when they all came to Sky, that was obviously abandoned.
Inspector Sands12,729 posts since 25 Aug 2004
The red button regions didn't happen until at least 2002. I don't think it lasted that long before all the regional versions started,maybe 6 months.

I can't remember what happened with UK Today, I think that ended when the red button started and from then on BBC London became the default 'sustaining' region (as it was pre-digital, albeit as South East)
nwtv20038,246 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Granada North West Today
The red button regions didn't happen until at least 2002. I don't think it lasted that long before all the regional versions started,maybe 6 months.

I can't remember what happened with UK Today, I think that ended when the red button started and from then on BBC London became the default 'sustaining' region (as it was pre-digital, albeit as South East)


The 5 regional programmes at 6:30pm were introduced on the red button on the last week of January 2002. I believe they were taken off for Wimbledon coverage that year. All of the other bulletins were replaced by London. UK Today finished the Friday before the change. All the regions appeared on satellite by June 2003.

Back to 2002 this was a promo that proceeded North West Tonight...

steve
steviegTVreturns
Markymark5,890 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The red button regions didn't happen until at least 2002. I don't think it lasted that long before all the regional versions started,maybe 6 months.

I can't remember what happened with UK Today, I think that ended when the red button started and from then on BBC London became the default 'sustaining' region (as it was pre-digital, albeit as South East)


The 5 regional programmes at 6:30pm were introduced on the red button on the last week of January 2002. I believe they were taken off for Wimbledon coverage that year. All of the other bulletins were replaced by London. UK Today finished the Friday before the change. All the regions appeared on satellite by June 2003.

Back to 2002 this was a promo that proceeded North West Tonight...



Yes, I remember that. Careful of course not to mention Sky by name. Sally Taylor on South Today
referred to finally being available on 'Dee Sat', which would have had almost every viewer wondering WTF she was on about !

This reminds me of the FTV card saga. When Sky Digital launched, you could buy an unsubsidised box, without a subscription package. That was fine, except you had no access to FTV encrypted services, notably the BBC, and C4 (I can't remember what the initial situation was with C5). The BBC and C4 funded an FTV
card scheme, where you could ring a helpline, and they'd send you a Sky viewing card paired to your box and postcode. Not many used the service, because of course most punters had bought their box with a subs package, so BBC and C4 were 'thrown in'. However, if you cancelled your Sky sub, (which folk did once the minimum term was up) your Sky card simply converted itself to an FTV card. No problem. Until 2003, when Sky decided to replace all viewing cards. This inconveniently coincided with the BBC going FTA on Astra 2D, and they said they would withdraw from the FTV card scheme, leaving just C4 (and C5 ?) to pay for it, which they opted not to. (ITV had never contributed to it, which is another story) . There was a flurry (of the technically savvy) of FTV card requests to the helpline before the closing date (July 31st 2003 IIRC).

There were loopholes though. One I used was a PAYV Adult channel called POUT. If you registered with them, they'd send you a viewing card, that was essentially an FTV card. Being PAYV, you didn't actually pay for their service, unless you phoned up to spend an evening watching them with a box of tissues. That card saw me through the next five years, at which point I went for Freesat
noggin13,884 posts since 26 Jun 2001
The red button regions didn't happen until at least 2002. I don't think it lasted that long before all the regional versions started,maybe 6 months.

I can't remember what happened with UK Today, I think that ended when the red button started and from then on BBC London became the default 'sustaining' region (as it was pre-digital, albeit as South East)


Yes - the UK Today sustaining service ended when Red Button regions started.
noggin13,884 posts since 26 Jun 2001

For 'ITV' (the network, not the company) to be on satellite required 15+ transponders to be rented, plus conditional access to avoid (in theory) viewing outside of the UK. Back in 1998 the Astra 28.2 birds had Europewide beams. All very expensive from a starting point of virtually no viewers using the platform, plus of course the OnDigital DTT factor.

What changed was Astra 2D in 2001, that had a UK focused beam. By then Sky Digital's penetration
had increased, no CA was required, so the network launched on there. The BBC followed them onto 2D in 2003,
that enabled the Beeb to ditch CA, and (so it goes) the money saved enabled them to launch the English BBC 1 regions on there.


Didn't ITV launch on Sky with CA though?


ITV 2 certainly did, and the BBC definitely ditched CA when they moved to 2D, but you might be right about ITV 1 ? If it was FTV it certainly wasn't regionally restricted (as the BBC nations were)


Yes - BBC One and Two (and BBC Choice before BBC Two) England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were all FTV but postcode restricted to cards registered in their home countries.

** EDIT - BBC Choice wasn't nation-restricted - I remember watching all four national variants... **

The BBC had 'special' cards that let you watch any of the 8 channels on hidden channel numbers. The same was also true of Red Button feeds - they could be viewed on channel numbers too with the right card, so you could monitor them without having to navigate an application (or prior to an application being launched)

The BBC used FTV post code restriction because a number of sports deals then in place for BBC Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were only for their territories, and not UK-wide. When they introduced FTA broadcasts on Astra 2D there were occasionally times when those sports were not available and a holding caption was broadcast pushing viewers to terrestrial. However as this also meant Sky viewers lost these programmes, the rights agreements were renegotiated at the earliest opportunity I believe.
Last edited by noggin on 23 July 2018 2:23pm
2
UKnews and Spencer For Hire gave kudos
thegeek4,586 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London

This reminds me of the FTV card saga. When Sky Digital launched, you could buy an unsubsidised box, without a subscription package. That was fine, except you had no access to FTV encrypted services, notably the BBC, and C4 (I can't remember what the initial situation was with C5). The BBC and C4 funded an FTV
card scheme, where you could ring a helpline, and they'd send you a Sky viewing card paired to your box and postcode.

They still offer this - £254 for a SkyHD box and dish (installed), or £25 for a FTV viewing card. Apparently you need the card to watch Channel 4 HD and Channel 5 - I'm not near my box to see if they disappear if I take the card out.
Markymark5,890 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

Didn't ITV launch on Sky with CA though?


ITV 2 certainly did, and the BBC definitely ditched CA when they moved to 2D, but you might be right about ITV 1 ? If it was FTV it certainly wasn't regionally restricted (as the BBC nations were)


Yes - BBC One and Two (and BBC Choice before BBC Two) England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were all FTV but postcode restricted to cards registered in their home countries.


Choice wasn't restricted, you could, and I did watch all four versions. A recall a certain Christine Bleakley
who was on Choice-NI as an in-vision continuity announcer.