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UK Govt launch another attack on BBC, C4 & S4C

Culture Secretary questions if "we need" PSBs

CA
Cardiffian Wales Wales Today
I hope this is the correct forum to start this thread in. More right wing attacks from the UK Conservative government on public service broadcasting in the UK are to come, and once again the absurd comparison between the BBC and Netflix & Amazon is made.
And of course the 'expert panel' that will be assembled to lead this 'review' into the future of PSB in the UK is completely impartial and not heavily right wing leaning at all, with the individuals on it having absolutely no vested interest in wanting to see the end of the BBC and public service broadcasting in the UK. Rolling Eyes

Quote:
Members on the public service broadcasting panel will include Conservative peer Lord Grade, who has previously been chairman of the BBC, executive chairman of ITV and CEO of Channel 4; Baroness Bertin, a former press secretary to David Cameron; and Sir Robbie Gibb, the former director of communications to Theresa May and former head of BBC Westminster.

Joining them will be Andrew Griffith MP, Boris Johnson's former business tsar and former chief operating officer of Sky Group PLC; and Nicola Mendelsohn, Facebook's vice president for Europe.
Several former senior executives of Sky, ITN and Endemol Shine are also on the panel.


Here's the full story: BBC News - Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden questions future of public service broadcasting
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-54885985

Quote:
Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden says there is genuine debate over whether "we need" public service broadcasters such as the BBC and Channel 4.

He told The Telegraph it was time to "ask really profound questions" about their role in the digital age - "and indeed whether we need them at all".

Mr Dowden is set to announce a new panel of experts to assess the future of public service broadcasting.

The BBC said it "continues to innovate, adapt and lead change".

In his article, Mr Dowden said Netflix and Amazon Prime had "lobbed a grenade into the system".

He added that the panel of broadcasting, journalism and technology leaders would not be "tiptoeing around the edges" but rather "drilling right down into the current system and how it operates".

He continued: "Public service broadcasting has already lived, adapted and thrived through a hundred years of history. It's time to start thinking about what it does next."

In a statement, a BBC spokesman said: "The past few months have served as a powerful reminder of just how much the BBC matters locally, nationally and globally. Our programmes and services have never been more relevant, important or necessary."

The BBC is "the number one media provider in the UK", the statement added. "And while the world is changing swiftly, so is the BBC. We will continue to innovate, adapt and lead change.

"We welcome the government's commitment to conducting an open and transparent process. We look forward to working with government to secure the right funding settlement for the BBC and its audiences."

'Flying the flag for Britain'
Members on the public service broadcasting panel will include Conservative peer Lord Grade, who has previously been chairman of the BBC, executive chairman of ITV and CEO of Channel 4; Baroness Bertin, a former press secretary to David Cameron; and Sir Robbie Gibb, the former director of communications to Theresa May and former head of BBC Westminster.

Joining them will be Andrew Griffith MP, Boris Johnson's former business tsar and former chief operating officer of Sky Group PLC; and Nicola Mendelsohn, Facebook's vice president for Europe.

Several former senior executives of Sky, ITN and Endemol Shine are also on the panel.

The panel will advise ministers on a strategic review of all public broadcasters, including ITV, Channel 5, STV in Scotland and S4C in Wales, looking at whether their current funding and governance arrangements are "fit for purpose".

The Telegraph said the panel was also expected to look at whether the broadcasters should continue to have prominence on channel menus by virtue of their status.

'Harangued or ignored'
The news comes as the government launches negotiations to decide how much the TV licence fee will cost between 2022 and 2027. That will determine how much funding the BBC and S4C receive.

Mr Dowden has written to the BBC asking how it intends to make savings, including through the salaries of its on-air talent; how it will support the vulnerable, elderly and lowest paid; and how it intends to "fly the flag for Britain in every corner of the world".

The culture secretary praised the role of the BBC during the coronavirus pandemic but argued that "a growing number of viewers feel harangued or ignored" in news, drama and comedy and it must change to ensure it reflects the views of the "entire nation".

He wrote: "Someone switching on their TV from their semi in Bradford should feel just as represented by the Beeb as a person watching in their Islington townhouse."

Speaking at the Creative Coalition 2020 festival on Tuesday, BBC director general Tim Davie admitted the corporation needs to "fundamentally change" how it recruits employees.

He said that while he is not "anti-Oxbridge", jobs should be accessible to people who do not have the same academic background.

Last month, Mr Dowden said Channel 4 privatisation was "on the table".

The channel was launched in 1982 as a publicly-owned, commercially-funded public service broadcaster.

It does not receive public funding and has a remit to deliver "innovative, alternative content that challenges the status quo".
Last edited by Cardiffian on 11 November 2020 5:22pm
HC
Hatton Cross Central (West) Midlands Today

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden says there is genuine debate over whether "we need" public service broadcasters such as the BBC and Channel 4.

He told The Telegraph it was time to "ask really profound questions" about their role in the digital age - "and indeed whether we need them at all".



Quick - the Conservatives need to create a diversion tactic from the botch job they've done on the pandemic. Break the emergency 'Let's kill off the PSB's' glass, at once..

The fact the Dowden said all this dribble in the Torygraph says it all. Playing to the crowd, and the crowd will lap it up.

I thought ministers of departmental offices were supposed to be uphold those offices until such time they are reshuffled out - or voted out - whichever is sooner. Not become a tired foghorned voiced troll for privatisation and kicking the BBC all over the place for the upteenth time this month.
Readers are warned that this post contains some flash photography
UL
UsuallyLurks West Country (East) Points West
Quote:
He wrote: "Someone switching on their TV from their semi in Bradford should feel just as represented by the Beeb as a person watching in their Islington townhouse."


The irony of this comment is that it's aimed at the type of voter that claims to abhor "identity politics"
BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
Was only yesterday Netflix and Sky were speaking about the value of PSBs.
Turns out nobody had 2020 vision.
JA
Jameseh Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
I’m sure they’ll also be keen to mention the amount of money the BBC has had to fork out to the “Local” TV companies from the very plans they drew up.

...and to clear up the widely mentioned notion that the over 75s license fee issue was a choice by the BBC.
HC
Hatton Cross Central (West) Midlands Today
A choice the BBC had with a metophoric gun to head, and George Osborne's finger on the trigger..
Readers are warned that this post contains some flash photography
JC
JCB
"Do we really need PSBs?"

What a time to be alive Rolling Eyes
SP
Steve in Pudsey Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
How long before there's a bus with "We send the BBC £68m a week" written on the side of it?
Write that down in your copybook now.
JO
johnnyboy Founding member Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
The irony of this comment is that it's aimed at the type of voter that claims to abhor "identity politics"


I personally detest identity politics but the BBC, as imperfect as it is, is a national treasure which sells the country to the rest of the world.

Whoever said that this is a distraction from the handling of the pandemic is spot on.

I don't think I've ever hated a government as much as this one and I'm what may be considered one of the people most likely to support it.

Reform the BBC - yes. Make it better reflect a wider variety of opinions - yes.

But scrap it, defund it, or neuter it so it can't do what it does better than anyone else - no.
OFCOM's queen bitch
CA
Cardiffian Wales Wales Today
The irony of this comment is that it's aimed at the type of voter that claims to abhor "identity politics"


I personally detest identity politics but the BBC, as imperfect as it is, is a national treasure which sells the country to the rest of the world.

Whoever said that this is a distraction from the handling of the pandemic is spot on.

I don't think I've ever hated a government as much as this one and I'm what may be considered one of the people most likely to support it.

Reform the BBC - yes. Make it better reflect a wider variety of opinions - yes.

But scrap it, defund it, or neuter it so it can't do what it does better than anyone else - no.

It's gradually been defunded for the last 4-5 years anyway with the freezing of the license fee and the government refusing to fund over 75 TV licenses, resulting in massive cuts, mainly to news and current affairs output. Look what's happened to the BBC NC just since the time it moved into NBH in 2013, it's a shadow of what it once was. Political analysis programming has also been decimated, much to the delight of the Tories no doubt.

There's no 'fat' left to cut at the BBC anymore, cuts made now directly affect what listeners hear and viewers see. Although many Conservative MPs have not hidden the fact they want the BBC to go back to the 1980s or earlier, with just 2 TV channels and 2 radio stations (Radio 3 & 4) with no online presence at all.
TG
Tim Goodwin1 Granada North West Today
This may be a bit controversial but I think having less channels is not terrible at all, as I believe it increases the quality of the service. This is not a BBC problem but an ITV/C4/C5/Sky/UKTV one too (as well as radio with the poor quality of some stations). There is no harm in having three channels which have a time share such as CBBC/Cbeebies on BBC Three. It is however an issue of getting rid of it completely or cutting it down to the bare bones. By having less channels, we have less repeats or pointless spin off shows like You're Fired or It takes too on BBC2 or in other cases Get me out of here now or the Friday night show with Bake Off or back in the 00s Little Brother with Big Brother, which waste screen time.

I still believe in a future with linear side by side with Netflix/Prime as the BBC still shows potential with Dr Who or His Dark Materials and Dracula.
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CA
Cardiffian Wales Wales Today
This may be a bit controversial but I think having less channels is not terrible at all, as I believe it increases the quality of the service. This is not a BBC problem but an ITV/C4/C5/Sky/UKTV one too (as well as radio with the poor quality of some stations). There is no harm in having three channels which have a time share such as CBBC/Cbeebies on BBC Three. It is however an issue of getting rid of it completely or cutting it down to the bare bones. By having less channels, we have less repeats or pointless spin off shows like You're Fired or It takes too on BBC2 or in other cases Get me out of here now or the Friday night show with Bake Off or back in the 00s Little Brother with Big Brother, which waste screen time.

I still believe in a future with linear side by side with Netflix/Prime as the BBC still shows potential with Dr Who or His Dark Materials and Dracula.

There's only 4 linear adult BBC TV channels now anyway. BBC 1 & 2, the NC and BBC 4, which most of the time is now an archive repeats channel.
The BBC News Channel and BBC World News have now effectively merged into one channel anyway they now share so much output.

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