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noggin14,318 posts since 26 Jun 2001
How does EVS work in that kind of situation? Is it like say Premiere in that you have to wait for the sequence to render or is it more real time?


As I understand it, the file would render from the editor in the normal way but it is then locally sent directly to the EVS to be played down the line. This saves the time needed to send the file across to the playout provider and for it then to be copied across to the main and guard servers, which could take an hour or two in total depending on the duration of the programme. I think they also send it to the EVS a part at a time, before the full edit is complete, which also saves time. From a playout point of view it's not unlike a live programme, with a live source coming in and counts in and out of breaks.

It's not too uncommon for the file to arrive half way though the programme, so you might get parts 1 and 2 as an EVS and parts 3 and 4 from server. In the most extreme cases you might have to start part 1 while still waiting for the editor to send part 4 to the EVS, but that's rare.


Yes - if the show is being edited on an external NLE then that will have render and export time, and the EVS will also have import (and potentially transcode if the NLE and EVS are using different codecs) time.

I know in the world of sport and events highlights, cut on EVS, it's not unusual for a highlights montage to have started to play-out before the final shots have been added to the sequence.
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thegeek4,869 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
I have a question for fellow TV Forumers. Have you ever gone behind the scenes of a TV show/channel and if so, what was it like?

Grueling, they expected me to work and everything Sad
"how many people work at the BBC? About half of them" (© T. Wogan, I believe)

I've been working in telly for quite a while now, but still get to enjoy seeing new bits of it. Last week I was in the OB truck for a football match and got to hear the producer and director working through their opening sequence, bouncing ideas off each other, and double-checking the accuracy of what was going to go to air.
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Technologist39 posts since 10 Oct 2018
London London
The majority of the major broadcasters In the UK and the networks in the USA required file delivery to The UK DPP "AS11" specifications
See https://www.thedpp.com/tech/delivery/
This is for Air ready material..
Longer term I think that delivery will be some form of IMF SMPTE ST 2067 standard
https://www.thedpp.com/tech/versioning/
And the SMPTE technical specification TS2121
https://www.smpte.org/technical-specifications/2018-08-16-app-dpp
Will be the norm...
Richard902 posts since 22 Apr 2012
Granada North West Today
Hello all, long time lurker, first time poster.

I have a query on the modified STV Enterprises endboard shown on the series 2 episode 35 of What's Up Doc,
(from about 52:54):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mhus6Dgd-bI

Does anyone know why this was used? It seemed a little dramatic at the time, and it still does. It could have been something to do with the "runaway tank" bit (skip back to 52:53), but even so it still looks a bit out of place.


Strange video, that, as there seemed to be a sound issue at the end - EDIT: actually it's probably song copyright.

The creator of that video has, for some reason added the appropriate ITV company logo to the start of the programme even though that practice ended in January 1988 (and earlier that than iirc for children's programming). This has cropped up on other videos:

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ANE4 posts since 16 Nov 2018 new member
Granada North West Today


Strange video, that, as there seemed to be a sound issue at the end - EDIT: actually it's probably song copyright.

The creator of that video has, for some reason added the appropriate ITV company logo to the start of the programme even though that practice ended in January 1988 (and earlier that than iirc for children's programming). This has cropped up on other videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Vm8ObXRGCs

It looks like TVSproductions82 mutes the music and snips out the cartoons from the uploads of What's Up Doc, and yes, it probably is for YouTube's famous checks.


*
But it is this, er, unique, endboard from series 2 episode 35 of What's Up Doc which has me puzzled. Did someone in Maidstone have some issue with someone in Cowcaddens or did the production staff just like messing about?
ANE4 posts since 16 Nov 2018 new member
Granada North West Today
If you look back a few seconds earlier in the episode that runaway vehicle thingy that the wolves lost control of has run across the set and the its's gone up in sparks, so presumably its implied that they burnt the endcap too in their destruction.

Heh - that does kind of makes sense really. As much as anything else on that show made sense...
Hatton Cross3,221 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
I’ve often wondered.. apart from Holby and I presume Eastenders production offices, who/ what else is housed in Neptune house?

It’s quite a large building for just the above isn’t it?

Good question.
I've assumed some 'back office' departments (payroll, HR recruitment ect) moved up there when TVC and 100 Wood Lane closed down.
My user name might look like Hatton Cross, but it's pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove.
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Si-Co2,122 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Which towns/cities or regions of the UK are served by one region for BBC and another for ITV?

I believe much of Lincolnshire is served by ITV Yorkshire but BBC East Midlands (so the regional news may be Nottingham-biased on the BBC but Leeds-biased on YTV).

Oxfordshire was served by ATV and Central until a decade or so ago, but part of the South East, and later South region of BBC.

Are there - or were there - anomalies in Gloucestershire (BBC West/ITV Central)?

I’d be interested to hear of any notable others.
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