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Jamesypoo1,453 posts since 3 Apr 2005
Anglia (East) Look East
The BBC was in a loose-loose situation here. The Labour government of 2001 decided to fund the fee for all over 75s. The Tories in 2016 decided this cost the government too much so told the BBC to fund part of it themselves. And now in 2019 the Tories have decided even part funding it costs too much and have decreed the BBC must now sort it out themselves.

This, along with the Tories in 2010 deciding to freeze the fee for 6 years and make the BBC fund the World Service and more of S4C has really put them in some sticky situations.

I'm not trying to be overly political here, but it's clear over the past decade the Tories have really pushed the BBC into a corner financially. I think in the circumstances the BBC have made the best decision.
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Ash10168 posts since 25 Mar 2018
Meridian (South) South Today

I'm not trying to be overly political here, but it's clear over the past decade the Tories have really pushed the BBC into a corner financially. I think in the circumstances the BBC have made the best decision.


Was it also a Tory policy of launching the local TV channels which took some money from the BBC licence fee?

I, personally, think the BBC has made the best of this situation - they’re not pulling the plug completely. But are expecting older people who can afford it to pay the fee.

There’d be more of a public outrage if BBC Two/Four/News Channel etc were cut in order to fund these. Plus, wouldn’t it mean under 75’s are basically paying 20% of their fee not towards TV/Radio/BBC Services but so over 75’s can get all that for free?
Riaz614 posts since 6 Jan 2016
The government is keeping quiet about this but there has been a notable decrease in the number of households with an active TV licence over the past 5 or so years - for both legitimate and illegitimate reasons.

Over 75's are seen as a 'captive' consumer as they tend to be the greatest users of BBC services and Freeview along with being most inclined to cough up and pay for a TV licence, as opposed to the younger generation who often has the audacity to watch iPlayer and satellite channels without a TV licence.
what206 posts since 11 Mar 2018
HTV West Points West

Over 75's are seen as a 'captive' consumer as they tend to be the greatest users of BBC services and Freeview along with being most inclined to cough up and pay for a TV licence, as opposed to the younger generation who often has the audacity to watch iPlayer and satellite channels without a TV licence.

Nearly all the BBC’s services for young people have been cut back or eradicated. We’re not inclined to pay for (or use) something that explicitly isn’t aimed at us.
Markymark7,096 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

Over 75's are seen as a 'captive' consumer as they tend to be the greatest users of BBC services and Freeview along with being most inclined to cough up and pay for a TV licence, as opposed to the younger generation who often has the audacity to watch iPlayer and satellite channels without a TV licence.

Nearly all the BBC’s services for young people have been cut back or eradicated. We’re not inclined to pay for (or use) something that explicitly isn’t aimed at us.


The over 75s I come into contact with don’t feel particularly well served by the BBC, particularly radio. They are intimidated by iplayer, and I can understand why as you are bombarded with a trailer before the programme you’ve selected, and it starts playing the next episode almost as soon as the credits start rolling, whether you want it or not.

There’s a general sense among them that TV ( not just the BBC) is not really aimed at them anymore.
My mother finds it impossible to use iplayer, I normally have to start the programme for her, and then leave her to it

Same applies to DVDs

YMMV
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Jamesypoo1,453 posts since 3 Apr 2005
Anglia (East) Look East

I'm not trying to be overly political here, but it's clear over the past decade the Tories have really pushed the BBC into a corner financially. I think in the circumstances the BBC have made the best decision.


Was it also a Tory policy of launching the local TV channels which took some money from the BBC licence fee?

Ah yes, current leadership contender Jeremy Hunt's baby.
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Riaz614 posts since 6 Jan 2016
Nearly all the BBC’s services for young people have been cut back or eradicated. We’re not inclined to pay for (or use) something that explicitly isn’t aimed at us.


It's a combination of factors. People of foreign origin are particularly acute when it comes to not buying TV licences as they often watch foreign satellite channels or internet TV. I know for sure that my local Kurdish barber's shop does not have a TV licence and the TV on the wall only shows a Kurdish TV channel.

Serious questions need to be asked about the (range of) services that the BBC provides and whether there are more modern and sensible ways of funding them than the 'flat rate' TV licence.
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Andrew13,727 posts since 27 Mar 2001
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
It's not even 24 hours since the announcement was made and the debate about the decision is already doing my head in. I wish the people who're criticizing the decision would explain how much of the BBC they would cut in order to fund the reportedly £745 million it would have cost the broadcaster (seeing they're now funding the free licences Pension Credit recipients will get, not the government) to keep giving free TV licences to everyone above 75.

It seems like the tabloid newspapers and people criticizing the decision (for some crazy reason) think providing free licences wouldn't cost the BBC anything when if they spent 10 minutes actually reading the documentation about the decision (like I did), they would have realized that:
Quote:
The new scheme will cost the BBC around £250 million a year depending on take-up. Had the BBC copied the Government’s scheme, the extra costs on top of around £500m would have meant unprecedented closures. In practice, we expect this would mean the closures of BBC Two, BBC Four, the BBC News Channel, the BBC Scotland channel, Radio 5live, and a number of local radio stations, as well as other cuts and reductions.


Sorry for the rant but seeing the uninformed debate has really frustrated me - especially because the BBC were between a 'rock and a hard place' in that they would have been crucified for whatever decision they made


No different than pretty much any debate about anything these days which all focus on how outraged someone can be about the topic
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