« Topics
1234...91929394
james-20014,466 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
The Chart Show made up a "video" of clips from his other videos. For whatever reason TOTP didn't go down that route. Watching The Chart Show, even right until the end in 1998, you could quite often see songs without videos, especially in the Dance/Rock/Indie charts, was quite rare on the actual Top 10 though.

Of all the people you'd think wouldn't make a video, Michael Jackson would be at the bottom of the list, his videos were as famous, maybe sometimes more so, than his music.

There are a couple of other 80s Number 1s which didn't have videos at the time they were Number 1 (but had one made later), Ride On Time was one, though they had studio performances (The Chart Show showed a performance from Ghost Train). Lady In Red also didn't have a video till later, funnily enough the video that was made was largely made up of footage from a TOTP performance. The video that's usually shown for Tainted Love was made for the 1991 re-release as well.
Colm (previously Col) 3,472 posts since 6 Jan 2003
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
Indeed, the last-but-one Chart Show in 1998 had a Number One with no video (at that time) - "Music Sounds Better with You" by Stardust.

TOTP, despite being in the Chris Cowey "no video" era and not averse to ignoring songs which charted as high as Number 2 if the artist wasn't able to record a studio performance, represented the song by a solo dancer when it entered the chart, and via a montage of studio performances from that year on the Christmas Day show.
1
Woodpecker gave kudos
james-20014,466 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
The TOTP Stardust "video" is bizzare, a woman dancing in a multicolured afro wig, wearing a TOTP T-shirt, in front of old TOTP crowd footage (including the strange 1969 footage an engineer recorded of a big breasted young woman dancing to Sugar Sugar- which I believe is the earliest surviving colour TOTP footage even though it probably wasn't broadcast).

One thing I've noticed about the Chris Cowey era, is despite his reluctance to show videos (even though it led to quite a poor variety of music on the show during his era at times, and the same performances sometimes being shown for weeks on end), he quite often did have the videos playing on the screens behind the act).

The Chart Show thing was good, as it gave them a way to show lots of old graphics towards the end of the run, a shame that episode never made it to The Vault's Chart Show repeats (and I wish someone would repeat them now, we're in an era of 80s & 90s nostalgia where I think they'd probably do reasonably well).
Last edited by james-2001 on 15 April 2019 8:53pm
1
Colm gave kudos
Lottie Long Legs (previously Skytower) 647 posts since 20 Apr 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
Gary Davies played Billie Jean on Sounds of the 80s on Friday, which really should dispel once and for all the idea that there's any BBC Michael Jackson ban (or even just a Radio 2 specific ban as some tabloids tried to suggest).

The non-appearance of Michael Jackson on Friday's TOTP seems to have made the rumours of a BBC ban re-emerge though, clearly from people who somehow didn't listen to Peter Powell's explanation.


In this age of ridiculous conspiracy theories, anything - absolutely anything - is fair game for people to believe. Especially when the tabloids go all CAPITAL LETTERS in their ATTENTION SEEKING ARTICLES.
Lottie Long Legs (previously Skytower) 647 posts since 20 Apr 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
One thing I've noticed about the Chris Cowey era, is despite his reluctance to show videos (even though it led to quite a poor variety of music on the show during his era at times, and the same performances sometimes being shown for weeks on end), he quite often did have the videos playing on the screens behind the acts


Videos, or specially recorded stuff on occasion. Not an original idea, mind - we started seeing videos behind the act used to good effect in 1994 - although with the set revamp in 1995, this idea went by the wayside for a couple of years.
Steve Williams2,627 posts since 1 Aug 2008
Videos, or specially recorded stuff on occasion. Not an original idea, mind - we started seeing videos behind the act used to good effect in 1994 - although with the set revamp in 1995, this idea went by the wayside for a couple of years.


Yes, as you mention, for a bit in 1997 there was a period where the bands would sometimes perform in front of footage of them on the screens - there's a performance of Never Ever by All Saints where they perform in front of shots of the four of them miming along to it, it looked quite distinctive.

There was one Girls Aloud performance where there was a competition for young film-makers to make a pop video, and they got on the winner whose prize was to make a video for Girls Aloud - but they only had it on the screens behind them, so you could hardly see it.
PFMC841,436 posts since 28 Feb 2013
UTV Newsline
Watched an episode of a 1997 TOTP on YouTube last night with Ian Wright presenting. So strange, his presenting style just didn't seem right for the show and so many odd camera angles where he was almost looking down on the camera and standing too close to it. Seemed quite bizarre.
Steve Williams2,627 posts since 1 Aug 2008
Watched an episode of a 1997 TOTP on YouTube last night with Ian Wright presenting. So strange, his presenting style just didn't seem right for the show and so many odd camera angles where he was almost looking down on the camera and standing too close to it. Seemed quite bizarre.


Well, John Peel said that when he returned to do that one-off show in 1995, he was a bit bewildered by the changes in camera technology the most, because he was now required to start doing his link looking at nothing, at which point the camera would fly in on a crane and then immediately fly off when he'd finished (in a manner that Peel said reminded him of shouting "and you can tidy your bedroom while you're at it" to his children). So it wasn't always the presenter's fault.

I know Ric Blaxill was desperate to get Ian Wright to present Pops because he was a huge Arsenal fan, and he was a big name at the time. The guest presenters was an interesting enough concept and sometimes they really worked, but it was a bit hit and miss. When they began in 1994 it was quite a big thing to have a guest presenter and they would be quite big names - Take That, Reeves and Mortimer - while the rest of the time it would be one of the regular DJs, but as time went on and they started having a guest host pretty much every week (with the DJs an absolute last resort) it started to seem like they were scraping the barrel a bit and you'd just have people on there for the sake of it. January 1997 is a good example, with Rhona Cameron, Phil Daniels and Noddy Holder in successive weeks. Hardly more interesting than before.

Also it sometimes it felt like there was a bit too much happening, so you'd have a big exclusive performance but it would be introduced by a comedian in character so it felt like it was being thrown away a bit. I'm not saying they should have got Simon Bates back to provide the required gravitas but it felt sometimes it didn't get the context it deserved. A good example is when Bis appeared when they were the first unsigned band to appear, and the presenters that week were the boy band MN8. They couldn't really explain who they were or why it was a big deal, so the audience would just go "well, who the hell's this?".
Woodpecker380 posts since 19 Jan 2018
Central (West) Midlands Today
I know Ric Blaxill was desperate to get Ian Wright to present Pops because he was a huge Arsenal fan, and he was a big name at the time. The guest presenters was an interesting enough concept and sometimes they really worked, but it was a bit hit and miss. When they began in 1994 it was quite a big thing to have a guest presenter and they would be quite big names - Take That, Reeves and Mortimer - while the rest of the time it would be one of the regular DJs, but as time went on and they started having a guest host pretty much every week (with the DJs an absolute last resort) it started to seem like they were scraping the barrel a bit and you'd just have people on there for the sake of it. January 1997 is a good example, with Rhona Cameron, Phil Daniels and Noddy Holder in successive weeks. Hardly more interesting than before.

Also it sometimes it felt like there was a bit too much happening, so you'd have a big exclusive performance but it would be introduced by a comedian in character so it felt like it was being thrown away a bit. I'm not saying they should have got Simon Bates back to provide the required gravitas but it felt sometimes it didn't get the context it deserved. A good example is when Bis appeared when they were the first unsigned band to appear, and the presenters that week were the boy band MN8. They couldn't really explain who they were or why it was a big deal, so the audience would just go "well, who the hell's this?".


I must admit, in some ways, I always found the idea of having a random celeb presenting each week very entertaining. If nothing else, I'd say it was worth it for such moments as Oasis making rude gestures behind Damon Albarn, Chris Eubank introducing Suggs' Cecilia at number six, and my personal favourite - Dennis Pennis (who, of course, is one of those characters played by comedians you mention) hosting and being incredibly rude about all of that week's perfomers:



In any case, I'd take the random guest hosts over the Jamie Theakston-fest that TOTP became a couple of years later. Not that I have anything against Jamie, but he was hosting it nearly every week at one point, which, coupled with the repetition of some performances, made the whole programme feel a bit samey.
3
bilky asko, Blake Connolly and paul_hadley gave kudos