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Spencer For Hire5,833 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Back to the trailer..

I know Partridge is a mash of various real life TV and radio presenters, but..

I'm seeing a lot of Nick Owen circa 1994 (The Good Morning With Anne & Nick years) in that jacket and shirt colour combo.


I always thought in terms of appearance, Adrian Mills was the closest lookalike to Partridge...



Robust amateurism
2
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JKDerry1,589 posts since 15 Oct 2016
UTV Newsline
First episode of This Time with Alan Partridge starts this Monday at 9:30pm on BBC One.

I hope it works, this could be a great failure if the writing and performance is not up to scratch. Last time Alan was properly on the BBC was the 2002 series of I'm Alan Partridge. The 1997 series was excellent, the 2002 series did not go down well with the viewers, which is one of the reasons why Alan has not been on the BBC since then much.
Inspector Sands13,584 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Are you sure about that? Seems to me that series 2 is just as well regarded as the first. The only viewers it didn't 'go down well with' were the ones that forgot the earier series had a laugh track.

It's certainly nothing to do with the next few Partridge projects not being on the BBC (the next one was though, in 2003) the character took a hiatus for a while as Coogan etcs careers all took off elsewhere,and he says that he fell out of love of the character until the new writers came along and revitalised it.

I always thought that Coogan was uneasy with the Sky association, but that was at a time when they were ramping up the British content and investing heavily in comedy, which the BBC weren't. The AP film was from BBC Films though


This new series is apparently excellent according to reviews I've read. His current writers, the Gibbon brothers have done no wrong so far so I have high hopes
3
Blake Connolly, Whataday and Steve Williams gave kudos
Neil Jones5,245 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Haven't seen it for a while but if I remember correctly Series 2 of I'm Alan Partridge changed the situation somewhat as I'm sure Partridge moved out of the hotel "seen" in the first series. Changing the location shifts all the dynamics and it could be just a case of having to create new characters and find new actors that didn't quite gel as well as they did five years previously. But that's a YMMV thing.
Inspector Sands13,584 posts since 25 Aug 2004
They were both filmed the same way, in a TV studio with an audience present. However they filmed the studio scenes in 4-walled sets rather than the usual 3 walled ones for greater realism. So the audience aren't watching them directly, they watching on screens, but the actors are playing to the laughter of a live audience apart from when there's a location scene, which I don't think there were that many of.

That's one of the reasons why people thought it was false laughter, the hotel reception looked real, not a sitcom studio set. The same for the caravan and its exterior, it was in the studio


The difference between series 1 and 2 was what came between. The two big sitcom hits in that time were The Royle Family and The Office, neither of which had laughter. In fact series 2 of IAP had the same slot as The Office:

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2002/nov/12/broadcasting.bbc3

And from the horses mouth:
Quote:
Meanwhile, Steve Coogan recalls how critical consensus shifted between the first and second series of I'm Alan Partridge in 1997 and 2002, between which The Office had been a hit. "We did the second series and people said: 'Why's there all this canned laughter?' We said, There's no canned laughter, it's real audience laughter because we're in a studio and they're laughing. But they choose to ignore what you've just said and say, 'Yes, but why is there canned laughter?'"
( https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/tvandradioblog/2013/aug/13/canned-laughter-critics-complaining)
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 21 February 2019 11:02am
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gave kudos
Neil Jones5,245 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
They were both filmed the same way, in a TV studio with an audience present. However they filmed the studio scenes in 4-walled sets rather than the usual 3 walled ones for greater realis. So the audience aren't watching them directly, they watching on screens, but the actors are playing to the laughter of a live audience apart from when there's a location scene, which I don't think there were that many of.


One episode of the first series was effectively all on location IIRC, the one with the obsessed fan (though I suppose those interiors were studio) and then the stuff filmed outside Television Centre, in the car and whatever else. I presume the scenes of the radio station were studio as well.

I suppose its to production credit really its not always immediately obvious what's studio and what could pass as location unless its blatantly obvious its location (such as if you're running through a field or something).