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thegeek4,720 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
My daughter's 4. I don't think we've watched any linear children's channels with her, but we make plenty of use of the iPlayer Kids app.

I don't think I'd appreciated quite how much British kids' TV makes use of 'grown-up' actors and artists - we were watching some Sarah and Duck and I had to look up where I recognised the narrator from: he was an MP in The Thick of It. Also the music in Catie's Amazing Machines sounds so much like it's in the style of The Darkness is because it *is* by The Darkness.

Hey Duggee is one of those shows that makes me happy to pay the licence fee. Entertaining and educational for children, funny for adults, gently subversive, and occasionally escapes its flat 2D world for some lovely animation. A-woof.
4
Blake Connolly, Steve in Pudsey and 2 others
  • bilky asko
  • Josh
gave kudos
Josh808 posts since 21 Dec 2014
My daughter's 4. I don't think we've watched any linear children's channels with her, but we make plenty of use of the iPlayer Kids app.

I don't think I'd appreciated quite how much British kids' TV makes use of 'grown-up' actors and artists - we were watching some Sarah and Duck and I had to look up where I recognised the narrator from: he was an MP in The Thick of It. Also the music in Catie's Amazing Machines sounds so much like it's in the style of The Darkness is because it *is* by The Darkness.

Hey Duggee is one of those shows that makes me happy to pay the licence fee. Entertaining and educational for children, funny for adults, gently subversive, and occasionally escapes its flat 2D world for some lovely animation. A-woof.

Duggee hug!
It's not even realistic.
james-20014,475 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
I admit I can't really comment too much on the quality of the shows these days, feels hard to comment too much on the quality of programmes not aimed at me that I'm probably nearly 20 years outside of the target audience of. A bit like how we've all grown up with our elders telling us the music we listened to and liked was crap and the music from the "old days" was better (and are probably saying ourselves about today's music).

Admittedly though I do feel like the channels themselves have gone downhill regardless of the quality of programmes, most kids channels seem to have a much narrower range of programmes in the schedule than they did in the 90s, and the same few shows seem to get heavily repeated. I remember the wide range of shows Cartoon Network had in the 90s, old and new. Even Boomerang is the same few (usually new) shows these days, they don't even show the old Looney Tunes since they started making new ones last year, and the Hanna-Barbera stuff they showed in the 00s is long gone. Plus the dropping of live in-vision continuity everywhere except CBBC (and pre-recorded on CBeebies), which was always something I used to like. Nickelodeon especially used to put a lot of effort into their IVC.
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Josh gave kudos
Neil Jones5,003 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I do wonder how long it can be before CBBC drops in-vision continuity altogether - looking from a point of view of the rest of the market it could be seen as anachronistic - after all that form of presentation for children was all the rage in the 80s, 90s and to an extent in the 2000's before it suddenly died off on CITV when they moved to Manchester from Birmingham.

Of course I dare say its probably expensive too compared to other things - presenters, the gallery, the rest of the team don't work for nothing - so if budgets are squeezed substantially the continuity would probably be one of the first things to go.
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Josh gave kudos
Inspector Sands13,267 posts since 25 Aug 2004

I don't think I'd appreciated quite how much British kids' TV makes use of 'grown-up' actors and artists - we were watching some Sarah and Duck and I had to look up where I recognised the narrator from: he was an MP in The Thick of It.

And Bernard Cribbins still appears on a programme on Cbeebies, he's in his 90s and appeared on kids tv when we were kids. Still as good as ever


Alexander Armstrong and Lorraine Kelly both narrate cartoons too.

Quote:
Also the music in Catie's Amazing Machines sounds so much like it's in the style of The Darkness is because it *is* by The Darkness.

That's a odd programme....

It's basically Toddler Top Gear presented by a very over enthusiastic, young, female rally driver. The whole thing is just her showing us a vehicle, then driving the vehicle while going 'woooowwww this is amazing'

It does seem like they planned it as 'one for the dads' but she's very very annoying (and looks about 16)



Apart from Catie's Amazing Machines, kids tv is so much better than when I was my kids age. Ed had Playschool and a 10 minute See Saw programme and then ITVs equivalent. Cbeebies is fantastic, its a golden age for kids tv

We still watch linear kids tv. My eldest is 4 and tends to use a tablet to watch stuff, mainly YouTube Kids. Which isn't as bad as it sounds as he seems to watch lots of stuff about colours and letters and numbers, of his own accord. But we'll still have Cbeebies on for him and his younger sibling partially as a background but also it's just easier.

Ours went through a phase where he would only watch his favourite programme, which we had recorded on series link onto our PVR and that's so annoying. Every programme is no longer than 19 minutes so you're constantly having to play the next. We got him out of that luckily
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Riaz561 posts since 6 Jan 2016
Children's TV viewing has heavily fragmented and it's commonplace for children and young teenagers to watch video material that isn't traditionally considered as children's programming. My 11 year old nephew rarely watches broadcast TV and instead prefers to watch DVDs and YouTube programmes about Minecraft and civil aviation.

Apart from cartoons, I have doubts whether linear children's TV channels have kept up with the tastes and consumer demands of the audiences that they are supposed to serve. To a certain extent, CBBC, and more acutely CITV, have veered into the realm of PSB box ticking rather than passionately entertaining viewers.

The truth is that the 'golden age' of children's TV on analogue terrestrial channels was from a more carefree era when kids only had a minimal amount of homework. I probably wouldn't be surprised if kids spend more time watching YouTube videos to help with homework than watching linear children's TV channels. Whilst they are on their tablet or smartphone, they might as well watch the Minecraft videos...

I found an interesting question about what were the best CBBC and CITV programmes from the 1980s - both a cartoon and a non-cartoon for each channel.

https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/threads/20888-The-best-CBBC-and-CITV-programmes-from-the-1980s
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Josh gave kudos
62305823,345 posts since 19 Aug 2005 Recently warned
STV Central Reporting Scotland
Tv companies give up on 11 -18 olds back in the 90s. Thus these people have been left behide and gone to other portals for there entertainment.

Why would these viewers come back to tv now? This is part of the reason tv is having problems now, and its thier own fault for not caterting for certain demographics and plugging the gap.
Is the next post dreaded?