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The Wheel

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HC
Hatton Cross
Jesus, not everything has to be a Paul Farrer composition. The man best known for reusing elements from one theme tune and putting it into another.

Examples: Poker Face, Dancing on Ice, The Weakest Link, The Chase, The Real Housewives of Cheshire and Winning Combination.

They all sound similar if not the same.

What’s worse is that I can instantly tell when it’s a Paul Farrer composition, just by the way the theme builds up.


And if I'm not mistaken, it was the exact same 'prize pot increase' sound effect sting used in this show, as they do in Pointless..
AN
all new Phil
The filler is part of the show. They’d be crazy to hire McIntyre to front something like this and play it straight Rolling Eyes the format is almost secondary. It’s meant to be a bit daft. Hence its scheduling on Christmas Day.
IS
Inspector Sands
It's like those who complain that Cats Does Countdown doesn't start playing the game until 25 minutes into the programme - the game is secondary, it's an entertainment programme
JO
Jonwo
It's like those who complain that Cats Does Countdown doesn't start playing the game until 25 minutes into the programme - the game is secondary, it's an entertainment programme

Catsdown is a panel show first and foremost so it makes sense that the game takes a backseat in favour of the comedy.
JK
JKDerry
Can someone answer this question - who funds the prize money for this show? Is it funded out of the licence fee, as there is a large cash prize, £76,000 on Saturday night. That is a lot of money for a BBC game show. The Lottery based game shows were bigger, but funded by the Lottery, however The Wheel has a lot of money available, so is it funded by BBC Studios, the commercial arm of the BBC, to save any issues with using the licence fee money on huge cash prizes?

Thanks for your help.
IS
Inspector Sands
I assume it'll be out of the budget of the show. The BBC will commission it and pay X amount to the production company for to make it. I'm pretty sure it's as simple as that. There might well be some sort of insurance backing up the prize money as I think Millionaire had, but of course there is was a lot more at risk

I don't know why BBC Studios would be involved unless they were involved selling the format or programme abroad.
JO
Jonwo
I assume it'll be out of the budget of the show. The BBC will commission it and pay X amount to the production company for to make it. I'm pretty sure it's as simple as that. There might well be some sort of insurance backing up the prize money as I think Millionaire had, but of course there is was a lot more at risk

I don't know why BBC Studios would be involved unless they were involved selling the format or programme abroad.

Hungry Bear Media are the producers of The Wheel, there is probably a set amount for prize money for the entire series plus the celebrity special.

Not sure why there would any backlash about the prize money as it’s not that much compared to Millionaire or The Cube.
JO
Jon
Can someone answer this question - who funds the prize money for this show? Is it funded out of the licence fee, as there is a large cash prize, £76,000 on Saturday night. That is a lot of money for a BBC game show. The Lottery based game shows were bigger, but funded by the Lottery, however The Wheel has a lot of money available, so is it funded by BBC Studios, the commercial arm of the BBC, to save any issues with using the licence fee money on huge cash prizes?

Thanks for your help.

I think it’s been established in the past that Lottery game shows weren’t funded by the Lottery. They were BBC commissions which merely contained the National Lottery draws. I’m sure the BBC taking any money for these shows wouldn’t have been allowed.

The press did make a big deal out of the Weakest Link primetime version offering bigger money in the past. But since we’ve had Lottery branded shows and The Wall give away around £100k since then, it seems we’re past that stage.

As mentioned most likely it’ll be out the programme budget, these shows will still come in cheap compared to big budget dramas.
Last edited by Jon on 29 November 2020 1:20pm
JKDerry, Brekkie and Jonwo gave kudos
GO
gottago
Jon posted:
Can someone answer this question - who funds the prize money for this show? Is it funded out of the licence fee, as there is a large cash prize, £76,000 on Saturday night. That is a lot of money for a BBC game show. The Lottery based game shows were bigger, but funded by the Lottery, however The Wheel has a lot of money available, so is it funded by BBC Studios, the commercial arm of the BBC, to save any issues with using the licence fee money on huge cash prizes?

Thanks for your help.

I think it’s been established in the past that Lottery game shows weren’t funded by the Lottery. They were BBC commissions which merely contained the National Lottery draws. I’m sure the BBC taking any money for these shows wouldn’t have been allowed.

The press did make a big deal out of the Weakest Link primetime version offering bigger money in the past. But since we’ve had Lottery branded shows and The Wall give away around £100k since then, it seems we’re past that stage.

As mentioned most likely it’ll be out the programme budget, these shows will still come in cheap compared to big budget dramas.

Yes this is all correct I believe. The prize money is certainly budgeted for in the price the BBC pays the production company.

I seem to remember a few years ago the prize limit for a BBC show is £100k though don't know if that's an average of £100k per episode across series - i.e. potentially they could give away more than £100k in an episode but that would have to be balanced out by a lower win/s in other episodes.
UN
Universal_r
It had pretty impressive ratings probably due to it starting straight from strictly.


LL
Larry the Loafer
Not having a "proper" IAC on the other side probably helped too.
MA
Meridian AM
Not having a "proper" IAC on the other side probably helped too.


Yep. A lot of people would have thought it was just 'highlights' again, especially as the TV mags and EPGs still said it was a look back over the week. However, it wasn't a repeat of what was already shown, but in fact it was 'all new' unseen moments that didn't make it to the final cuts of the live shows.
And also the pubs are still closed, so more people are captive.

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