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Sky News...

...to go airbourne (July 2003)

:-(
A former member Anglia (East) Look East
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NG
noggin Founding member
TVS also had a helicopter in the late 80s.

They planned to use it both as a flying camera platform and also as a way of doing live links from the ground - by using it as a mid-point for remote microwave links (receiving it and re-broadcasting it to the broadcast centre) Not sure it was used much - and cheaper satellite technology meant that microwave mid-points were not required for live links.

The BBC did have their own helicopter camera mounting (HeliTele) - but this was mainly used for sport and events production rather than news - and it hired the helicopter as required.

I'm not sure - but I believe that the UK air safety rules may be tighter than in the US - you are only allowed to fly twin engine helicopters over built-up areas (like cities) and the flying time for twin engine helicopters is quite limited. This means that helicopters have to factor in re-fuelling time, and pilots have quite strict flying limits in terms of continuous hours. For a planned event refuelling time can be reduced by parking a fuel tanker on a playing field - but for non-scheduled flights you need to land at a helipad with fuel facilities (Battersea may be the central London location?)
CA
cat
noggin posted:
TVS also had a helicopter in the late 80s.

They planned to use it both as a flying camera platform and also as a way of doing live links from the ground - by using it as a mid-point for remote microwave links (receiving it and re-broadcasting it to the broadcast centre) Not sure it was used much - and cheaper satellite technology meant that microwave mid-points were not required for live links.

The BBC did have their own helicopter camera mounting (HeliTele) - but this was mainly used for sport and events production rather than news - and it hired the helicopter as required.

I'm not sure - but I believe that the UK air safety rules may be tighter than in the US - you are only allowed to fly twin engine helicopters over built-up areas (like cities) and the flying time for twin engine helicopters is quite limited. This means that helicopters have to factor in re-fuelling time, and pilots have quite strict flying limits in terms of continuous hours. For a planned event refuelling time can be reduced by parking a fuel tanker on a playing field - but for non-scheduled flights you need to land at a helipad with fuel facilities (Battersea may be the central London location?)


Ahh, I mentioned the TVS thing on page 1 and hoped you'd be able to provide some sort of technical explanation as to why they had it!

I think you're right about the UK safety rules, noggin. This was always the problem that ITN had with their helicopter - it was difficult to get permission for it to fly over some parts of Central London. Certainly when the IRA mortar bombed the cabinet and ITN got pictures from their helicopter literally moments after the explosions, questions were asked as to why ITN were even flying over the area in the first place.

It's going to be very interesting to see the speed at which Sky get the helicopter out. If they're saying it can get from London-Glasgow in 2 hours 30 minutes, then they must surely be expecting to get pictures from anywhere over London in a maximum of ten minutes.

But you have to hope that being near Heathrow, they don't get hit by a jumbo coming in to land!
:-(
A former member Anglia (East) Look East
c@t posted:
But you have to hope that being near Heathrow, they don't get hit by a jumbo coming in to land!

can you just imagine the headlines:
'SkyCopter causes collision at Heathrow'

Still, atleast they would have the exclusive pictures of it!!!

Will
:-(
A former member Anglia (East) Look East
Fear posted:
c@t posted:
But you have to hope that being near Heathrow, they don't get hit by a jumbo coming in to land!

can you just imagine the headlines:
'SkyCopter causes collision at Heathrow'

Still, atleast they would have the exclusive pictures of it!!!

Will


It'd be ironic if such a collision happened whilst covering severe traffic congestion on the 19th of December this year...

12 days later

LO
Londoner London London
And the ticker is back for the Hutton Inquiry latest...

38 days later

:-(
A former member Anglia (East) Look East
Does anyone have screen caps of or from the SkyCopter?
:-(
A former member Anglia (East) Look East
Here is a site that has images of a small handful of Live Choppers in use across the United States.
http://www.adam2fly.com/news.html
KA
Katherine Founding member
Gareth Attrill posted:

In the UK it's illegal to listen to transmissions of which you are not the intended recipient. In the US some police departments stream the police frequencies from their website but the UK police are *extremely* protective of their radio transmissions and would not be amused if Sky started following police chases from the air.

It's not just the Police that jealously guard the privacy of their frequencies. I found this on the official website of the Red Arrows Aerobatic display team...

Quote:
We get a lot of mail and phone calls, asking for the Red Arrows' air-to-air frequencies so that they can listen in. Unfortunately, a few people think it is great fun to transmit on our frequencies during air displays, offering advice. Obviously, such interruptions are extremely dangerous. To try and minimise such illegal acts, we never publicise our radio frequencies although we are, of course, aware that it is very easy for anyone with a scanner to find them. The Team Leader can change his pilots to a new frequency at short notice if necessary.


Woe betide anyone that tries to sabotage one of their displays....

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