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noggin14,437 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Televox seems to be a development of the Prestel system, but was ahead of its time. Nowadays, I'm sure voice command would be the norm, but was a technological marvel back in 1990.


It's a bit of a leap to suggest it's a development of Prestel. Prestel used a 1:1 link over your phone line and could be used for stuff like e-mail. It had a 1200 baud download speed, but only a 75 baud upload speed (slower than most people type) AIUI the 75 baud upload was originally not going to be used and instead DTMF 'touch tones' would have been used hence the 0-9*# menu structure - but when it was clear that text needed to be uploaded too a low bandwidth reverse data channel was added.

Televox etc. just allocated a specific teletext sub-page to the user and allowed remote control of what was seen on that page. It was far more restrictive - and only used the phone call for control, not to carry data. I guess you could say it was capable of some of the similar things - but it's not really a development of Prestel.

Prestel and the other UK videotext systems were definitely ahead of their time. Booking holidays and home banking 'online' in the early-to-mid 80s is something people forget we had the ability to do Smile
Markymark6,957 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

Prestel and the other UK videotext systems were definitely ahead of their time. Booking holidays and home banking 'online' in the early-to-mid 80s is something people forget we had the ability to do Smile

Indeed, and the French had a much more advanced and very popular Viewdata system called Minitel. Year ahead of the web:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minitel


Yes, as you say way ahead of its time. I think the deal was you could have a free terminal, in exchange for not having a phone book supplied, therefore saving a forest or two Cool
robertclark1251,409 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
In the early 1990s, for a few weeks, ITV tried a Sunday morning magazine programme, Sunday Brunch, hosted by Julian Pettifer and someone else. During it was Morning Worship, although at the start of the first one, Pettifer said "Viewers in the Scottish and Grampian regions will have their own service" Obviously, that Sunday Brunch was much different from the one today, and I think it dealt with topical items as well.
Steve Williams2,781 posts since 1 Aug 2008
In the early 1990s, for a few weeks, ITV tried a Sunday morning magazine programme, Sunday Brunch, hosted by Julian Pettifer and someone else. During it was Morning Worship, although at the start of the first one, Pettifer said "Viewers in the Scottish and Grampian regions will have their own service" Obviously, that Sunday Brunch was much different from the one today, and I think it dealt with topical items as well.


As I mentioned in the Sunday morning thread, this was one of the magazine shows that sandwiched the Morning Worship after ITV decided to put all their religious programmes in one two hour block from 10.30 to 12.30. There were a couple of other shows in that slot, with names like Sunday Live and Sunday Matters, I couldn't tell you what the difference was between them all.

They alternated in that slot for a couple of years before ITV were able to reduce their relgious commitments still further.
Andrew13,662 posts since 27 Mar 2001
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Back in the 90s Nickelodeon used to show some obscure American stuff in the off peak hours when they weren’t showing the big hitters.

An obscure one, does anyone know the name of a drama they showed, I think it was Canadian actually, about a family, which is I recall were Jewish?
robertclark1251,409 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
I remember something like that in the 80s, on BBC1, but I think it was Canadian. The opening titles finished with an oval photo of the family, on a black background, and below the title of the programme.

Staying with Nickelodeon, they showed an American series about a boy who had loads of CCTV in his house, to see what was going on, and loads of monitors, branded "NOSY", as opposed to some Japanese manufacturer. Bailey Kippers POV was the name.
Neil Jones5,406 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I remember something like that in the 80s, on BBC1, but I think it was Canadian. The opening titles finished with an oval photo of the family, on a black background, and below the title of the programme.

Staying with Nickelodeon, they showed an American series about a boy who had loads of CCTV in his house, to see what was going on, and loads of monitors, branded "NOSY", as opposed to some Japanese manufacturer. Bailey Kippers POV was the name.




It wasn't a Nickelodeon show, it actually went out on CBS originally but was co produced by MTM Enterprises (which our TVS had bought years previously and later sold in 1993) and by the time Bailey Kipper came along it was effectively a Fox production in all but name at that time. Presumably it only ended up on Nickelodeon through syndication. Bailey Kipper only ran for 13 episodes (and it did air over here on CBBC) but I suppose had it debuted on Nickelodeon it might have lasted longer, it was an interesting premise that was quite ahead of its time.

Lead actor Michael Galeota who played Bailey Kipper on the show died in 2016 from heart disease, he was only 31.
ccskycomedy9 posts since 21 Aug 2019 new member
London London
During late 2000s and early 2010s, 5 News under Sky News got very lightweight with Live From Studio 5 and OK!TV, the former could have been better if it was revamped into a Ellen style chat show hosted by Bob Mills.