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Should (and could) ITV regionalise again?

Should, and could, ITV create a more localised, but national service, be reinstated?

AM
AlfieMulcahy Meridian (South East) South East Today
Almost exactly the same thing as this was posted on the same page 5 hours earlier!
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PA
Parker
They could introduce the old brands for a repeat channel but they cant be bothered. They sold their London HQ for money to pay down the pension deficit, preferring to squat at TVC & some bland building in Holborn.
I'm sure it will be american owned soon and they wont know where The Central or Yorkshire areas were or where the UK is for that matter Smile
..."at the first sign of danger my pussy's hairs stand on end" Betty Slocombe 27/05/1975
TG
Tim Goodwin1 Granada North West Today
Just by interest (even though this will never happen), I made a video at the start of the year about how I feel the regions would survive in the 21st Century

Skip to 18:08 to hear my blueprint

Tim Goodwin Productions:

Talking about TV idents and adverts on the web

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmvObylho6bbyOUhTwuTPbA/videos
NL
Ne1L C Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Its an interesting idea but would be rife with issues. The section referring to ITV, Channel 4 and 5 joining forces potentially with the Global Radio network would provide the BBC and Sky with a real competition but who would own what.

Likewise if the new "channel 4" were the regional broadcaster then they would either have to buy the current ITV regions studios etc or build their own which would be exceedingly expensive.

Thirdly how would programme allocation work. Who would get what? The likes of Emmerdale etc would be the focus of real competition beyond the three tv channels.

Still I can see how such a setup could work although UKIB sounds a bit too much like UKIP for me. I would call the network NBN or National Broadcasting Network:

NBN TV 1
Network programming as ITV now but with no local programming. 7PM to 9PM would be primetime. Saturday and Sunday mornings would be Children's programming

NBN TV 2
Local programmes with a 50/50 split between individual local area programmes between 12 PM and 7PM and then a "best of british strand" networking different regional programming across the network

NBN TV 3
Another national station with blocks of programming dedicated to documentaries, lifestyle, retro, sport with Sundays dedicated to movies.

News On NBN 1 provided by NBN News with NBN Newshours at 8 AM, 12 PM, 6 PM and 9 PM with local bulletins on NBN 2 at 9 AM. 1PM and 5 PM with a brief bulletin at closedown. NBC Sports News would be at 5.30 and 10.30 PM on NBN TV 3

NBN Radio 1: Heart/XFM
NBN Radio 2: Smooth
NBC Radio 3: Classic FM/Radio 4
NBN Radio Now: LBC/5 Live
Last edited by Ne1L C on 10 July 2020 5:00pm - 4 times in total
JO
Jon Central (West) Midlands Today
The idea of making Radio X the default commercial national radio network is laughable. As is whole post. ‘NBN’ as a brand sounds a whole less appealing than ‘Heart’ or ‘Magic’ for example.

That said I would be in favour of Global and Bauer being given up to 6-8 national licences in exchange for handing back their local licences. So the FM waveband can be tidied up.

Then again, realistically I think FM and DAB has realistically only has a good 10 years left in it. As I think smart speakers in homes and cars will become the norm rendering traditional transmission obsolete. The biggest question for radio groups is how are they going to adapt to make sure their operations are still relevant for when that happens.
NL
Ne1L C Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Jon posted:
The idea of making Radio X the default commercial national radio network is laughable. As is whole post. ‘NBN’ as a brand sounds a whole less appealing than ‘Heart’ or ‘Magic’ for example.

That said I would be in favour of Global and Bauer being given up to 6-8 national licences in exchange for handing back their local licences. So the FM waveband can be tidied up.

Then again, realistically I think FM and DAB has realistically only has a good 10 years left in it. As I think smart speakers in homes and cars will become the norm rendering traditional transmission obsolete. The biggest question for radio groups is how are they going to adapt to make sure their operations are still relevant for when that happens.


Are you referring to the radio section of the post or the whole post?
JO
Jon Central (West) Midlands Today
Jon posted:
The idea of making Radio X the default commercial national radio network is laughable. As is whole post. ‘NBN’ as a brand sounds a whole less appealing than ‘Heart’ or ‘Magic’ for example.

That said I would be in favour of Global and Bauer being given up to 6-8 national licences in exchange for handing back their local licences. So the FM waveband can be tidied up.

Then again, realistically I think FM and DAB has realistically only has a good 10 years left in it. As I think smart speakers in homes and cars will become the norm rendering traditional transmission obsolete. The biggest question for radio groups is how are they going to adapt to make sure their operations are still relevant for when that happens.


Are you referring to the radio section of the post or the whole post?

The whole thing. It’s not really a model that would work in 2020 and would become less viable every year.
JO
Jon Central (West) Midlands Today
From a commercial point of view a single entity combining the businesses of ITV, (a privatised) Channel 4 and Five would probably make sense. It would result in less choice for the viewers though. The regional network is pie in the sky though with no real appetite and unsustainable in an age of lower audiences and streaming services.
NL
Ne1L C Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Jon posted:
Jon posted:
The idea of making Radio X the default commercial national radio network is laughable. As is whole post. ‘NBN’ as a brand sounds a whole less appealing than ‘Heart’ or ‘Magic’ for example.

That said I would be in favour of Global and Bauer being given up to 6-8 national licences in exchange for handing back their local licences. So the FM waveband can be tidied up.

Then again, realistically I think FM and DAB has realistically only has a good 10 years left in it. As I think smart speakers in homes and cars will become the norm rendering traditional transmission obsolete. The biggest question for radio groups is how are they going to adapt to make sure their operations are still relevant for when that happens.


Are you referring to the radio section of the post or the whole post?

The whole thing. It’s not really a model that would work in 2020 and would become less viable every year.


Just wanted to clarify. No-one knows what would have happened and viability is of course important. I listen to a lot of internet radio through smart speakers and iOS especially Smooth and I have to say that the ease of use and the choice is impressive.

Just putting my opinion out there.
MK
Mr Kite Granada North West Today
Unfortunately we went down the road of nationwide commercial broadcasters unlike the US or Japan. I would say it was as long ago as the launch of Channel 4 that suggested we would be going down the centralised route; although in some ways, Channel 4 was effectively a subchannel for ITV in the early years. Channel 5, of course, was UK-wide with no programme variations and then, with the advent of digital, we went down a largely laissez-faire approach of allowing as many channels as practically possible which ate into the audience share of the PSB broadcasters, as did other forms of home entertainment such as the internet, video games and now TV streaming services.

If we had the BBC plus a handful of networks, all with a level playing field in terms of PSB commitments, then it could possibly work, as it still does in the likes of Japan. You'd probably have a London-based key station that produced most network output as well as local London stuff and, depending on ownership rules, a certain number of directly owned regional stations in the largest areas, say, in Birmingham, Manchester/Liverpool and Leeds and the rest would be affiliates with a relationship similar to what STV currently has with ITV.

The regional nature of these stations would largely depend on what committments their licence conditions put upon them in terms of local programmes. They could be the same as now in England, with just news essentially. Or it could be slightly higher, similar to Wales. Some would stick to the bare minimum whilst others may do more, as ITV companies often did in the old days.

Things like continuity and branding would also vary. Those directly owned by the network would probably have largely the same branding and continuity for the most part. Some independent stations may like to be as separate as possible and maintain their own identities similar to STV. Others may feel saving money would be better and largely utilise network presentation (as Channel did from 2002 onwards) and even pay the network for transmission services. You'd also get other companies owning a number of the regional stations, as is common in America and Australia.

But, alas, we are where we are.
Last edited by Mr Kite on 10 July 2020 5:46pm
NL
Ne1L C Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
That reminds me of this article from Transdiffusion:

https://www.transdiffusion.org/2001/08/01/affiliations
WH
what West Country (East) Points West
Merging the UK’s three largest commercial TV networks and its largest radio stations would deprive people of a voice, eliminate minority programmes and interests, and would likely exarcebate the problem of programmes being cheap and low quality.

As bad as they may be now, the commercial broadcasters work better on their own as opposed to being combined. Mega-mergers such as the one being proposed here only really benefit shareholders.

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