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Reminiscing The Big Breakfast

House up for sale for just £5.75m - page 19

WH
Whataday Founding member Wales Wales Today
The most incredible thing about the 1996 rebuild is that it didn't have planning permission, and wouldn't have got it had they applied.
JB
JasonB London London
Some more footage of the brown house here:

Yes, this is the same guy who couldn't find his keys or his phone.
Have you washed your hands?
SW
Steve Williams
Flux posted:
It seems quite unique to the Big Breakfast. I guess it was so groundbreaking at the time, and as we’re still seeing its influence on many shows it still feels relevant somehow.


I'd say. There was a big article in Broadcast a year or so ago about The Word and how influential that was, mostly because everyone who worked behind the scenes has gone on to become major players in British television, but I would always say The Big Breakfast had a much bigger influence. Like The Word, the entire production team now pretty much runs British TV, and also it had a huge influence on everything, the whooping crew and cameramen getting into shot and so on had been done before, most obviously by Kenny Everett, but it was The Big Breakfast that really inspired everyone else to do it, so much so it had become a massive cliche within a few years (hence RI:SE initially saying they weren't going to do it).

And as I say, in its early days every kid in Britain was talking about it, I certainly thought of little else. It's like how everyone who saw the Sex Pistols in their early days went off and formed a band, pretty much everyone of a certain age working in telly these days was at least partly inspired by The Big Breakfast to go and do it.

It also shows how much effort went into the show during the early Johnny Vaughan years, such as the skits they'd do with special effects (split screen etc) and sending him out on OBs. Compared to this, 1999 and 2000 seemed a bit lazy.


A lot of that is probably down to the increased informality you always get when a show has been running a while or a host has been there for a bit. If you look at the early episodes of Have I Got News For You and Would I Lie To You, they have loads more rounds, and the number was thinned down over the years because the regulars could be relied on to be funny and interesting in their own right. And later in Vaughan's era, you could get ten minutes out of him just talking. Of course, towards the end it became increasingly self-indulgent, so there is a happy medium.

It's like Chris Evans on Radio 1, when he started he had a load of features and planned stuff, and towards the end they'd all gone out of the window and it would just be him talking all morning and he was confident enough to do no preparation whatsover. The ultimate example of that was when he moved to Virgin where he famously turned up to the studio about ten minutes before the show and I think still had his coat on while doing the first link. Of course, Evans admits in his book this was a dreadful period, as previously he'd prided himself on how well structured his shows were, with all his features dotted throughout to give it a proper shape and a decent pace, and now he'd just show up, start talking and two hours later he'd just stop.

They quite often moved away from the French Windows for the Christmas shows so it wasn't 3pm in the afternoon behind them. Throughout the shows history it was often just moving to the side but I think during the early years they also repositioned in front of the fireplace.


Yes, I remember they would do the Christmas pre-records from the sofas in front of the fireplace in the early years.
JC
JCB
If you're interested.....



BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
This quote from Rick Edwards shows the influence it had on a generation of presenters too:
Quote:
The Big Breakfast: it made me want to be a presenter. I watched Johnny Vaughan and knew I wanted to be as good as him. It was such a fun, lively, intimate show. You felt as if you were part of something. My first ever gig in TV was working on [Channel 4’s] RI:SE – an extremely pale imitation. My excitement to be there quickly wore off when I realised everyone hated it and it wasn’t very good. RI:SE was not worth getting up that early for, but the Big Breakfast would have been.

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/oct/13/rick-edwards-i-was-offered-the-role-of-an-unhappy-peruvian-husband#comment-144517164

I think the quote "you felt as if you were part of something" probably sums up why many of us still remember it quite fondly - even the bad times are kind of owned by the fans.
Turns out nobody had 2020 vision.
JB
JasonB London London
A Christmas pre-record from the 27th December 1993, note the slightly different font on the clock:
Have you washed your hands?
WH
Whataday Founding member Wales Wales Today
Notice how the whole clock shifts at 10:00.
IN
Interceptor
Notice how the whole clock shifts at 10:00.

Left hand edge stays the same. I presume this was something C4 were adding on at playout, hence the difference to normal?
JB
JasonB London London
The date of that clip featuring the show on Challenge Anneka was aired on the 17th September 1995. The full episode one including the visit to the BB is on YouTube:

Have you washed your hands?
JA
james-2001 Central (East) East Midlands Today
Notice how the whole clock shifts at 10:00.

Left hand edge stays the same. I presume this was something C4 were adding on at playout, hence the difference to normal?


I'm guessing the idea of running a line down to the Lock Keepers' Cottages to add the clock on pre-records hadn't started by 1993.
BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
Strange they didn't have the Christmas titles.
Turns out nobody had 2020 vision.
JA
james-2001 Central (East) East Midlands Today
Interesting too that it's structured in a way where the first hour is mostly cartoons linked by Zig & Zag, the show proper doesn't begin until the second half.

Interestingly that Monster Tails cartoon is also one of the shows that featured on TV Mayhem during its short run.

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