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dosxuk4,485 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Just in case anybody doesn't get this joke, Wikipedia says:

"Inspector Sands" is a code phrase used by public transport authorities in the United Kingdom, including Network Rail and London Underground, to alert staff and other agencies, such as the police, to an emergency or potential emergency such as a fire or bomb threat without alerting the public and creating panic. The exact wording depends on the station and the nature of the incident. For example: "Would Inspector Sands please report to the operations room immediately." or "Would Inspector Sands please report to Platform 2".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6PLTDuSFOE



As my workplace's de-facto Health & Safety Co-Ordinator (Basically the sad person who tests the fire alarm on a weekly basis), I'd much rather hear myself referred to over the PA as Inspector Sands, as opposed to Mr. [Insert Surname Here]. Laughing


I didn't know that. I'll know now for future reference...then bolt for the nearest exit. Very Happy Very Happy


The codes played over PA systems that should make you want to think about bolting for the exit if heard aren't anywhere near as much in the public realm as Mr Sands. Sands has almost become a parody of itself with the amount of people who know what it means and the amount of use it gets. The whole idea of code names is to alert staff to something happening without alerting the general public, it doesn't work if everyone knows what it means (e.g. Sands, is often used as a precursor to a "proper" alarm which the public will notice, in order to allow staff to get ready to carry out their duties in an evacuation).
2
Mike W and BBI45 gave kudos
Neil Jones6,209 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I prefer, for fire alarm testing purposes, "This is only a test, no need to evacuate. If you see me running like buggery in that direction you probably should follow".

Of course if it was a real fire one would professionally evacuate all and sundry, alert the fire services and then run like buggery.
Inspector Sands14,545 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I've had this username ever since I joined this site many years ago, I don't think there was a particular reason why.

A few years after adopting it I was walking through a tube station and 'Inspector Sands' bellowed out across the PA system and scared the living daylights out of me. Then I remembered that it wasn't my real name and it wasn't all about me Embarassed
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Inspector Sands14,545 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Do you know if the standby tapes held in Birmingham had a generic continuity announcement on the beginning apologising for the lack of the scheduled programmes or did Dad's Army just crash onto the air without any explanation?

I remember seeing some sort of test years after that with looped BBC1 and 2 apology captions which I think were in Pebble Mill.


In the early-mid 2000's they had to soup up their DR plans as Westfield was being built and there was a very good likelyhood that there was at least 1 unexploded WWII bomb on the site. There was talk about TVC potentially being out of bounds for a week. I think playout had moved up the road by then and even if it wasn't in the evac zone it would still have caused issues
Markymark7,839 posts since 13 Dec 2004 Recently warned
Meridian (North) South Today
Just in case anybody doesn't get this joke, Wikipedia says:

"Inspector Sands" is a code phrase used by public transport authorities in the United Kingdom, including Network Rail and London Underground, to alert staff and other agencies, such as the police, to an emergency or potential emergency such as a fire or bomb threat without alerting the public and creating panic. The exact wording depends on the station and the nature of the incident. For example: "Would Inspector Sands please report to the operations room immediately." or "Would Inspector Sands please report to Platform 2".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6PLTDuSFOE



As my workplace's de-facto Health & Safety Co-Ordinator (Basically the sad person who tests the fire alarm on a weekly basis), I'd much rather hear myself referred to over the PA as Inspector Sands, as opposed to Mr. [Insert Surname Here]. Laughing


I didn't know that. I'll know now for future reference...then bolt for the nearest exit. Very Happy Very Happy


In my local Waitrose, mention of Mr Grumble is a good signal not to go anywhere near the gents loo!
4
AndrewPSSP, Night Thoughts and 2 others
  • cityprod
  • bilky asko
gave kudos
robertclark1251,512 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
Getting away from supermarkets, I was wondering about the power failure in 2000 at TVC. With control switched to Birmingham, they were playing out Dads Army, which BBC South east were taking in place of their local news. So, how could Birmingham then have opted out of themselves to show their regional news bulletin? Were they able to do so?
Mr Kite901 posts since 15 Aug 2007
Granada North West Today
As a backup centre, I assume they could. Otherwise, they may as well have shown Midlands Today in London. Would've been a bit unfair to deprive the Midlands of their news just because London couldn't have theirs.

Going back up the thread a bit: BBC analogue definitely used BBC South East as the network feed throughout the 90s. I distinctly remember watching BBC One North East & Cumbria whilst on holiday in Scarborough. This was in the very early days of regional headlines being embedded in the network news open. Newcastle were just that bit tardy in opting out and for just a brief second I got to see Mike Embley in the blue Newsroom South East studio. That was summer 1999.
dosxuk4,485 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Getting away from supermarkets, I was wondering about the power failure in 2000 at TVC. With control switched to Birmingham, they were playing out Dads Army, which BBC South east were taking in place of their local news. So, how could Birmingham then have opted out of themselves to show their regional news bulletin? Were they able to do so?


They would just have patched feeds from the makeshift pres setup in Birmingham to the network feed sent round the country, so for MT it is business as usual opting their transmitters out of that feed - it wasn't the MT studio output that was being fed to the networks.

South East at that time had no opt-out ability, so network took their studio output.

Nowadays with centrally located multiplexing it's all set up completely differently.
Steve in Pudsey10,714 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
At one time the plan was for network news to commandeer Studio B at Pebble Mill (with a joint World News/News 24 operation from Studio A) so there may have been some disruption to Midlands Today.

Gallery C became the stand-in for NC1 and the regional Pres gallery stood in for NC2.

Deejay explains more in this post https://tvforum.uk/forums/post698378#post-698378
Write that down in your copybook now.
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deejay and Inspector Sands gave kudos
Richard985 posts since 22 Apr 2012
Granada North West Today
I'm not sure, wasn't the reason they couldn't broadcast a Wales opt out programme early in the evening that they hadn't got the spare pres suite on air yet (because somebody probably had to come in specially to do it) so Wales was simulcasting NI?

Once they had a separate feed for Wales they were able to play out Wales only programming.


Yes, you’re right, and they even managed to show Wales Today after the BBC News at Ten from the Cardiff studio but routed through Belfast.