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Score40 posts since 22 Dec 2019
Granada North West Today
The advertising rules are as follows:

Arrow You can show a maximum of 12 minutes of ads in an hour
Arrow Over 24 hours you can show an average of 7 minutes of ads (on the main 5 channel, 9 minutes on other channels)
Arrow Between 6-11pm you can only show an average of 8 minutes of ads, so 40 minutes altogether.

Therefore as ITV can show 36 minutes of ads between 7-10pm they usually only show minimal ads in the 6pm and 10pm hour, but rather than cutting the ad breaks they usually fill them with promos, mainly because they can show the sponsorship bumpers.


The 40 minute rule is so archaic. I’ve no issue with the 12 minutes per hour or 7 minutes over 24 hours, but 40 minutes between 6-11pm just seems pointlessly restrictive and encourages them to put no effort into the 6pm and 10pm hours because they’d just lose money on any expense. Pointless exercise.
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Night Thoughts278 posts since 24 Jan 2016
London London
Thank you for the responses on this - I saw a bit of Catchphrase and wondered about the lack of ads.

Yeah, they wouldn't have been showing adverts in the middle of a rugby match.

Actually in the middle of a rugby match is when they have to get them in.
I meant while they're actually playing. ITV have got in trouble in the past for taking a commercial break in a Formula 1 race and missing some major action on the track. And didn't they once accidentally go to ads during a football match and miss a goal? Each part of a rugby match is 40 minutes. In a normal programme, there'd be two ad breaks in that time frame. Not when a rugby (or football) match is in progress.


2009, Everton v Liverpool in the FA Cup


some regions saw this (quite a goal to miss too):
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Brekkie34,004 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Completely disagree - it benefits us hugely as viewers to have virtually commercial free news most nights and gives channels the flexibility to show programmes that may not appeal to advertisers in primetime.

Now there might be an argument to tweak it to 45 minutes but going to 60 would be of no benefit to the viewers. What is a real shame is that broadcasters don't use it more to their advantage - Dancing on Ice would benefit hugely from having 3-4 breaks rather than 6, while ad free films against Strictly for example if marketed right could prop up their whole evening.
Stay Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives.
JasonB5,304 posts since 20 Sep 2003
London London
Yeah, they wouldn't have been showing adverts in the middle of a rugby match.

Actually in the middle of a rugby match is when they have to get them in.


Apparently in the early days of football being televised if the ball went out of play it was a signal for the broadcaster to go to ads, and play would resume when they came back.

Of course this doesn't happen now, but you can sometimes see a similar thing when US sports are simulcast over here.


I went to a baseball game while in the USA with some relatives in 2010 and us Brits wondered why play kept stopping every so often, our American relatives told us it was because this game was being televised and they stop for adverts.
Have you washed your hands?
Score40 posts since 22 Dec 2019
Granada North West Today
Completely disagree - it benefits us hugely as viewers to have virtually commercial free news most nights and gives channels the flexibility to show programmes that may not appeal to advertisers in primetime.

Now there might be an argument to tweak it to 45 minutes but going to 60 would be of no benefit to the viewers. What is a real shame is that broadcasters don't use it more to their advantage - Dancing on Ice would benefit hugely from having 3-4 breaks rather than 6, while ad free films against Strictly for example if marketed right could prop up their whole evening.


Agree on commercial free news but the point about programmes that don’t appeal to advertisers doesn’t really stack up as they have breaks in them anyway. They could still show those programmes if they wanted to with adverts and make some money on them. Most advertising isn’t done through spot buying anyway so the advertisers often don’t choose exactly which programmes their adverts go into. They just buy a certain number of spots to reach a certain number of viewers, normally in particular demographics, and the sales team allocate the adverts. You do get spot buying in the bigger shows and certain specific shows but it’s not the majority.

It would benefit the viewers if it encouraged more commissioning in the shoulder peak hours rather than relying on films and repeats. I’m not saying increase the number of adverts across the day, just allow more flexibility in the spread.

Ad free films might rate OK against Strictly but it wouldn’t be any use to ITV because they’d make no money on them.
Lewismpsmith177 posts since 12 May 2018
Meridian (South East) South East Today
Thank you for the responses on this - I saw a bit of Catchphrase and wondered about the lack of ads.

Actually in the middle of a rugby match is when they have to get them in.
I meant while they're actually playing. ITV have got in trouble in the past for taking a commercial break in a Formula 1 race and missing some major action on the track. And didn't they once accidentally go to ads during a football match and miss a goal? Each part of a rugby match is 40 minutes. In a normal programme, there'd be two ad breaks in that time frame. Not when a rugby (or football) match is in progress.


2009, Everton v Liverpool in the FA Cup
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRV7sOZ3X3s

some regions saw this (quite a goal to miss too):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGCw0UjYR1I


Twice in fact!

Stay At Home. Protect the NHS. Save Lives.
UKnews908 posts since 26 Apr 2011
Yeah, they wouldn't have been showing adverts in the middle of a rugby match.

Actually in the middle of a rugby match is when they have to get them in.


Apparently in the early days of football being televised if the ball went out of play it was a signal for the broadcaster to go to ads, and play would resume when they came back.

Of course this doesn't happen now, but you can sometimes see a similar thing when US sports are simulcast over here.

Pretty certain that's nonsense, in this country at least. The ITA would never have allowed that, and the vast majority of games were shown as highlights, so no need to interrupt play to fit in commercials.
Johnr567 posts since 6 Apr 2004
How do ad breaks work in the Netherlands?

I watched a 1hr 30m programme on NPO1 Saturday night which had no ad breaks but it seemed that they showed a good 5-10 minutes of them before and after! (Adverts and channel promotions)
Markymark7,845 posts since 13 Dec 2004 Recently warned
Meridian (North) South Today
How do ad breaks work in the Netherlands?

I watched a 1hr 30m programme on NPO1 Saturday night which had no ad breaks but it seemed that they showed a good 5-10 minutes of them before and after! (Adverts and channel promotions)


NPO shows programming from different broadcasters, depending upon a particular programme it may not be permitted to carry ads during the show. Similar to BBC programmes that are shown on S4C
Neil Jones6,209 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Of course back in the past when the TV landscape was different you would have great chunks of programming that wasn't allowed to have commercials all over it. Schools programming is the classic example here, some religious programmes and one or two other things.

There were always exceptions to the rules though - the original run of the Krypton Factor for some reason lost in the mists of time went for quite a while without an internal ad break, but I think Granada's hand was ultimately forced in the 1990s, and then I presume it was twisted right off for the 1995 series but we won't talk about that.
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thegeek5,391 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
Schools programming is the classic example here, some religious programmes and one or two other things.


That's still the case, it's just that there isn't really any schools programming left to be interrupted by ads. (That said, who knows what might return in the coming weeks!)

Royal ceremonies and Parliamentary coverage also have restrictions.

The full code is at https://www.ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/32162/costa-april-2016.pdf