« Topics
1234...91011
Robert Williams772 posts since 25 Jan 2003
London London

To make things worse, they currently call themselves BBC WM 95.6 which is just too clunky - hopefully they will take the opportunity to drop the '95.6'.


It seems a bit dated now having the frequency as part of a station’s name. Many which did include it have dropped it over the past few years due to the many other ways of finding a radio station nowadays. And even on FM, surely most people these days just hit ‘seek’ until they find the station they want. It seems hardly worth promoting the frequency so prominently for the few people who still twiddle a knob (if you pardon the expression).

WM is in a crowded radio market compared to many other places, it's also easier to do it there as it's only on the one FM frequency, so I can understand why they do it. BBC London do/did a similar thing if I remember correctly.


Also happened in a couple of other areas - BBC Radio Oxford was 'BBC Oxford 95.2FM' for a while in the mid-2000s, and when Solent adopted the old LBC jingles in 1995, they became known as 'Solent 96.1 from the BBC' until they absorbed Dorset FM in 1996 when they shortened it to 'Solent from the BBC', then 'BBC Solent', and finally back to plain old 'BBC Radio Solent' by 1998.

The Radio Tees name change makes me wonder if the word 'Radio' is to be added into any other stations that currently lack it - the two obvious exceptions are BBC Hereford and Worcester where the name is already long enough, and BBC Essex - although Essex Radio/Essex FM has long since been assimilated into Heart, there is now a Radio Essex which prevents the BBC from using that name.
Spencer (previously Spencer For Hire) 6,112 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
The Radio Tees name change makes me wonder if the word 'Radio' is to be added into any other stations that currently lack it - the two obvious exceptions are BBC Hereford and Worcester where the name is already long enough, and BBC Essex - although Essex Radio/Essex FM has long since been assimilated into Heart, there is now a Radio Essex which prevents the BBC from using that name.


I think the problem with Tees is that it's the only station that had just one syllable in its name (excluding the BBC bit), so it was never going to fit the jingles otherwise. Coventry and Warwickshire was the longest, but they're fixing that by going back to CWR.
Spencer (previously Spencer For Hire) 6,112 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
In another change on BBC Local Radio, they’ve announced they are stopping using INRIX as the provider of presented travel bulletins

https://radiotoday.co.uk/2020/02/bbc-local-radio-stations-to-drop-inrix-bulletins/

They will still use their data but will get someone in house to read it out


I've mixed feelings about this news. My first job in broadcasting was doing travel news at AA Roadwatch for BBC LR and some commercial stations. It provided a useful way into the industry for me and a lot of other people. I still know a few people who work for Inrix as well, so I'm sad to see jobs going there.

On the other hand, since Inrix closed quite a few of its offices, many stations now have their travel news coming from hundreds of miles out of patch, often read by someone who has never set foot in the area. I've no doubt having travel news from a local presenter who knows the area will result in a better service.
1
Night Thoughts gave kudos
Markymark7,818 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
In another change on BBC Local Radio, they’ve announced they are stopping using INRIX as the provider of presented travel bulletins

https://radiotoday.co.uk/2020/02/bbc-local-radio-stations-to-drop-inrix-bulletins/

They will still use their data but will get someone in house to read it out


I've mixed feelings about this news. My first job in broadcasting was doing travel news at AA Roadwatch for BBC LR and some commercial stations. It provided a useful way into the industry for me and a lot of other people. I still know a few people who work for Inrix as well, so I'm sad to see jobs going there.

On the other hand, since Inrix closed quite a few of its offices, many stations now have their travel news coming from hundreds of miles out of patch, often read by someone who has never set foot in the area. I've no doubt having travel news from a local presenter who knows the area will result in a better service.


If they are compiling it yes, and if they have any common sense and think about what they have actually written/reading.

Example I heard once. 'The A31 is blocked both ways by a accident'

Very useful, the A31 runs about 100 miles from Guildford in Surrey to Bere Regis in Dorset
Richard984 posts since 22 Apr 2012
Granada North West Today
In another change on BBC Local Radio, they’ve announced they are stopping using INRIX as the provider of presented travel bulletins

https://radiotoday.co.uk/2020/02/bbc-local-radio-stations-to-drop-inrix-bulletins/

They will still use their data but will get someone in house to read it out


I've mixed feelings about this news. My first job in broadcasting was doing travel news at AA Roadwatch for BBC LR and some commercial stations. It provided a useful way into the industry for me and a lot of other people. I still know a few people who work for Inrix as well, so I'm sad to see jobs going there.

On the other hand, since Inrix closed quite a few of its offices, many stations now have their travel news coming from hundreds of miles out of patch, often read by someone who has never set foot in the area. I've no doubt having travel news from a local presenter who knows the area will result in a better service.


If they are compiling it yes, and if they have any common sense and think about what they have actually written/reading.

Example I heard once. 'The A31 is blocked both ways by a accident'

Very useful, the A31 runs about 100 miles from Guildford in Surrey to Bere Regis in Dorset


I have two issues that come to mind with travel news on the radio. Firstly, I've heard presenters in the past saying "The M62, Manchester bound...". The M62 has two sections, the main section, east of Manchester and the much shorter section between Manchester and Liverpool. Both sections were joined together in the past but part of the motorway became part of the M60 so the motorway is essentially two separate motorways.

Secondly, national stations sometimes refer to motorways and other roads in Northern Ireland without making it clear. I'm all for including NI (as I'm from there myself) but if someone in GB hears "Junction 8 on the M1" they will assume it refers to the one in England (even if it doesn't) and someone in NI my not think it affects them (they will probably only be half listening anyway).
Andrew14,294 posts since 27 Mar 2001
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
In another change on BBC Local Radio, they’ve announced they are stopping using INRIX as the provider of presented travel bulletins

https://radiotoday.co.uk/2020/02/bbc-local-radio-stations-to-drop-inrix-bulletins/

They will still use their data but will get someone in house to read it out


I've mixed feelings about this news. My first job in broadcasting was doing travel news at AA Roadwatch for BBC LR and some commercial stations. It provided a useful way into the industry for me and a lot of other people. I still know a few people who work for Inrix as well, so I'm sad to see jobs going there.

On the other hand, since Inrix closed quite a few of its offices, many stations now have their travel news coming from hundreds of miles out of patch, often read by someone who has never set foot in the area. I've no doubt having travel news from a local presenter who knows the area will result in a better service.

Well no travel news is made physically in Yorkshire for the BBC, and all those who do the bulletins at peak times generally make a good job of it. Some of those at off peak times or holiday cover aren't always great though.

It helps if they are fully absorbed in travel every day rather than getting a BBC employee doing it, who will presumably be doing it as well as something else so may just read out the list of incidents to get it out of the way.
Spencer (previously Spencer For Hire) 6,112 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
In another change on BBC Local Radio, they’ve announced they are stopping using INRIX as the provider of presented travel bulletins

https://radiotoday.co.uk/2020/02/bbc-local-radio-stations-to-drop-inrix-bulletins/

They will still use their data but will get someone in house to read it out


I've mixed feelings about this news. My first job in broadcasting was doing travel news at AA Roadwatch for BBC LR and some commercial stations. It provided a useful way into the industry for me and a lot of other people. I still know a few people who work for Inrix as well, so I'm sad to see jobs going there.

On the other hand, since Inrix closed quite a few of its offices, many stations now have their travel news coming from hundreds of miles out of patch, often read by someone who has never set foot in the area. I've no doubt having travel news from a local presenter who knows the area will result in a better service.

Well no travel news is made physically in Yorkshire for the BBC, and all those who do the bulletins at peak times generally make a good job of it. Some of those at off peak times or holiday cover aren't always great though.

It helps if they are fully absorbed in travel every day rather than getting a BBC employee doing it, who will presumably be doing it as well as something else so may just read out the list of incidents to get it out of the way.


My experience is that the opposite is generally true. Working in a remote office trying to keep on top of travel news across a large swathe of the UK for dozens of radio stations doesn't always result in the best service.

Also when all a presenter has to do is open and close a fader once every half hour for the travel news, there can be an inclination to zone out and not to have a clue what's going on out there.

When presenters in-house do their own travel news, at least they have to have a good idea what's going on, and when there's something significant, can give additional updates as required throughout a show. It also helps when you've got listeners calling the station with information (if BBC LR has any sense, they'll stop promoting the Inrix phone numbers and promote their own) meaning you can get it on straight away, rather than waiting until the next bulletin.

Clearly a lot depends on the individuals concerned. If all you do is toss off a rip-and-read list for one of the most valued services you provide, I'd argue you're not doing your job, and the boss should have a word.
Robert Williams772 posts since 25 Jan 2003
London London
Despite everything else that's going on, the roll-out of the new jingle package has continued, today arriving in Surrey and Sussex which have reverted to their earlier names of BBC Radio Surrey and BBC Radio Sussex. It's strange hearing the name 'BBC Radio Surrey' spoken on my radio once again after more than 26 years! BBC Newcastle and BBC Wiltshire have also recently reinstated the word 'Radio' in their names to fit into the new jingles.

The list of stations now taking the new jingles:

Cornwall
Cumbria
CWR
Leeds
Leicester
Lincolnshire
Manchester
Newcastle
Nottingham
Solent
Surrey
Sussex
Tees
Wiltshire

So with 14 out of 40, it's a long way from the original intention to roll them out within three months, but I'll let them off given the present situation!
3
Spencer, jonO and BBI45 gave kudos