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noggin13,895 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Can you imagine the flack the BBC would be getting if they'd launched a series of sub-par local channels with licence fee money, subsidised by commercial income. Quite rightly they'd be slated.


Precisely. Yet the BBC trialled local TV in the West Midlands - and by all accounts it was a lot higher quality than the That's/Made output - but was not extended because of competition fears (local papers mainly I think)...
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Night Thoughts gave kudos
Markymark5,908 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
The local newspaper industry successfully lobbied against BBC local television. They quite enjoy their near-monopoly on local media - even if it is a declining one.


To anybody remotely IT literate ( in other words smart phone or tablet/PC users) local newspapers ( and their websites) are irrelevant shadows of their former selves. 10-15 years ago packed with local ads. Our local paper had pages and pages of houses and cars for sale, in fact the advertising was the primary many reason people bought the paper

Rather like local radio now, today local papers all seem to be owned by a handful of companies, and are all identikit publications with nothing much of value in terms of articles or advertising, and the websites have silly click bait gimmicks.

Most people now use social media and t’internet to gather local information. I remember last winter’s snow, the town’s local radio station said it couldn’t broadcast very much local information because their internet connection was down. Says it all really !

Local papers are all but dead now, local broadcasting may not be far behind
2
lhx1985 and Closedown gave kudos
lhx1985159 posts since 23 Apr 2015
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Sadly, there's not a thing to disagree with in your post.

The worrying thing is if local television is a non-starter, local radio is increasingly becoming national radio, local newspapers are becoming irrelevant and local websites can't make any money then we are effectively giving up on local media and more importantly, local journalism.

If local news become a patchwork of Facebook group rumour mills then we are heading for serious trouble.
1
Night Thoughts gave kudos
Markymark5,908 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today


If local news become a patchwork of Facebook group rumour mills then we are heading for serious trouble.


There's Social Media sites run by local police, and other authorities. For stuff like closed roads, buildings on fire, closed schools etc, etc there's not really much to worry about, it's pure 'black and white' factual stuff.

What is a worry, are local planning issues, and matters of policy. The same 'fake noos' concerns apply to those, as do national and international matters.
Markymark5,908 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
I’m not sure the appetite for local news is dead. Copies of one of the local free papers in Tesco are usually always gone by the end of publishing day (I.e. when I try to get one). Plus we have another free paper that’s delivered.


Free newspapers will always be popular, because they are free. In my area, even before the age of the internet, they were pretty limp publications, only really to promote the 'main event' newspaper that was a paid for publication. YMMV.

The most popular free newspaper, that is quasi national is The Metro, but it's just full of printed click bait, would you pay money to read it ?
lhx1985159 posts since 23 Apr 2015
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)


If local news become a patchwork of Facebook group rumour mills then we are heading for serious trouble.


There's Social Media sites run by local police, and other authorities. For stuff like closed roads, buildings on fire, closed schools etc, etc there's not really much to worry about, it's pure 'black and white' factual stuff.

What is a worry, are local planning issues, and matters of policy. The same 'fake noos' concerns apply to those, as do national and international matters.


There are two main problems with relying on the media units of public agencies and authorities for news a) it's a massive PITA to have to go out and compile your own news bulletin for the day and b) there's no dissenting voices - the word of your local police force media unit becomes the word of God without any reasonable scrutiny.

You're right about local policy issues - the degree to which local authority media units endeavour to 'control the message' is chilling. We all need strong local journalism.

That's, et al were created to provide this... the fact that they're doing less than the other existing knackered old local media outlets is shameful.
1
Night Thoughts gave kudos
Markymark5,908 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today


If local news become a patchwork of Facebook group rumour mills then we are heading for serious trouble.


There's Social Media sites run by local police, and other authorities. For stuff like closed roads, buildings on fire, closed schools etc, etc there's not really much to worry about, it's pure 'black and white' factual stuff.

What is a worry, are local planning issues, and matters of policy. The same 'fake noos' concerns apply to those, as do national and international matters.


There are two main problems with relying on the media units of public agencies and authorities for news a) it's a massive PITA to have to go out and compile your own news bulletin for the day and b) there's no dissenting voices - the word of your local police force media unit becomes the word of God without any reasonable scrutiny.


Well, the scrutiny comes from the responses the public make to some of those tweets !

However, there's never been much scrutiny from local media to press hand outs anyway, just cut and paste journalism (and I include broadcasters for some of that too, )
lhx1985159 posts since 23 Apr 2015
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
A few one-sentence twitter messages with the odd angry-face emoji is hardly an effective method of scrutinising power.
It's very easy to dismiss tweets as irrelevant - and let's face it, they are. By large, they'll be unseen by most people anyway.

Proper scrutiny comes with considered reporting, transmitted to an audience base of significant size (ie mass media), not reactionary one-liners tweeted to a handful of sycophants.

It's the equivalent of saying you can hold power to account by having a chat down the pub.
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Mouseboy33, Spencer For Hire and Night Thoughts gave kudos
Brekkie30,023 posts since 4 Jan 2003 Recently warned
HTV Wales Wales Today
It isn't all social media though - local websites, both connected to the local media groups and also relatively new enterprises, have filled the gap. Yes, they may cover far fewer stories and may only report rather than challenge or campaign, but in reality there was only ever a couple of pages of actual local news in papers anyway.


Bringing it back to local TV and the timing and delivery method was just all wrong. ITV had the better idea with ITV Local, and that lasted all of a couple of years, though was arguably ahead of it's time. Even if there is appetite for a daily short local bulletin and some local series and streaming of some local events throughout the year nowadays delivering that as part of a broadcast channel isn't really going to break through.
Shouldn't that have been posted in the "John Logie Baird has Invented Television" thread?