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Live Aid 1985 - BBC Camera Quality

What caused the lines on certain cameras

TE
Technologist London London
Aah right I never realised that was an issue but yeah it seems quite obvious now, yeah I imagine the issue is long gone in the digital age.

No the Digital Age - but the Solid State age -
Its is very easy to get microphonic effects from ironmongery in a Vacuum tube
a lot less (in fact almost impossible) from a Solid lump of Silicon - a ccd.

Btw the LDK 5 camera - the workhorse for OBs of the time - had it tubes fanned Horizontally
- so you could easily see over the camera
But this meant that there were registration issues /errors as the camera panned across the earths magnetic field
https://www.tvcameramuseum.org/philips/ldk5/p1.html look in Brochures how useful it was
and could be connected many ways but 1500m on Triax was a great game changer i
NG
noggin Founding member


Btw the LDK 5 camera - the workhorse for OBs of the time - had it tubes fanned Horizontally
- so you could easily see over the camera
But this meant that there were registration issues /errors as the camera panned across the earths magnetic field
https://www.tvcameramuseum.org/philips/ldk5/p1.html look in Brochures how useful it was
and could be connected many ways but 1500m on Triax was a great game changer i


Once BBC OBs got the Philips Minicams in the very early 70s - which pioneered triax (only a very small number of PAL models of that camera were made) - there was no way they were going to be buying multicore cameras again if they could avoid it. The LDK5 was indeed a game changer for OBs - and the pictures they generated were very good (particularly the very early models - which I believe had slightly better aperture correction than later models?)
NG
noggin Founding member
Aah right I never realised that was an issue but yeah it seems quite obvious now, yeah I imagine the issue is long gone in the digital age.


It had gone in the analogue age too once CCD cameras replaced tubed cameras. (CCDs are analogue too Wink )
DO
dosxuk Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Humans are susceptible to a similar effect - stand too close to a loud sound and the pressure waves mean your eyes are changing shape and you lose the ability to focus properly, makes reading things really difficult.
CO
commseng London London
It was more that there haven't been tube cameras for a while, it has been CCD sensors since around the 1990s (I think), rather than the change to digital.
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
It was more that there haven't been tube cameras for a while, it has been CCD sensors since around the 1990s (I think), rather than the change to digital.


I can remember Sony's first CCD broadcast camera, the BVP-5P, 1986 or 7. It was pretty grim, you could see 'clock noise' and a lovely vertical white line on bright objects, but hey, you gotta start somewhere....
--
Avatar credit: © BBC, ITA, BREMA 1967
TE
Technologist London London
The long Video here
https://www.smpte.org/webcast/the-technology-of-motion-image-acquisition?hsLang=en
takes you though almost everything to do with cameras !!!
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
Humans are susceptible to a similar effect - stand too close to a loud sound and the pressure waves mean your eyes are changing shape and you lose the ability to focus properly, makes reading things really difficult.


I've noticed the same in pubs, normally after I've been in one for a few hours. Obviously must be the music Cool
--
Avatar credit: © BBC, ITA, BREMA 1967
parrferris, dosxuk and Brekkie gave kudos
BL
bluecortina
It was more that there haven't been tube cameras for a while, it has been CCD sensors since around the 1990s (I think), rather than the change to digital.


From memory we got our first Hitachi CCD studio cameras in the late 80’s, but CCD technology didn’t last too long very quickly moving on to CMOS imaging technology.
BL
bluecortina
It was more that there haven't been tube cameras for a while, it has been CCD sensors since around the 1990s (I think), rather than the change to digital.


I can remember Sony's first CCD broadcast camera, the BVP-5P, 1986 or 7. It was pretty grim, you could see 'clock noise' and a lovely vertical white line on bright objects, but hey, you gotta start somewhere....


Sony must have looked very enviously at Philips’ LDK 90 series where they had that ‘feature’ completely designed out from the start.
BL
bluecortina


Btw the LDK 5 camera - the workhorse for OBs of the time - had it tubes fanned Horizontally
- so you could easily see over the camera
But this meant that there were registration issues /errors as the camera panned across the earths magnetic field
https://www.tvcameramuseum.org/philips/ldk5/p1.html look in Brochures how useful it was
and could be connected many ways but 1500m on Triax was a great game changer i


Once BBC OBs got the Philips Minicams in the very early 70s - which pioneered triax (only a very small number of PAL models of that camera were made) - there was no way they were going to be buying multicore cameras again if they could avoid it. The LDK5 was indeed a game changer for OBs - and the pictures they generated were very good (particularly the very early models - which I believe had slightly better aperture correction than later models?)


Some small credit to Marconi here I think, I understand the MkVIII camera was designed for use with MkIV cable connectors and was, I think, barely 10mm in diameter and that included 3 coax videos within it for the baseband signals. Could only go up to about a kilometre. (Like the BBC were ever going to consider Marconi !).
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
It was more that there haven't been tube cameras for a while, it has been CCD sensors since around the 1990s (I think), rather than the change to digital.


I can remember Sony's first CCD broadcast camera, the BVP-5P, 1986 or 7. It was pretty grim, you could see 'clock noise' and a lovely vertical white line on bright objects, but hey, you gotta start somewhere....


Sony must have looked very enviously at Philips’ LDK 90 series where they had that ‘feature’ completely designed out from the start.


I do recall "disappointment" from the grown ups upstairs, when they came down to our lab to take a look at the prototype that had just arrived from Japan
--
Avatar credit: © BBC, ITA, BREMA 1967

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