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Neil Jones5,509 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
A UHD channel using the same sort of idea that is in the Sky boxes to have a local set of adverts seamlessly inserted into a national feed could be the story of thing they're talking about.


Like an extension of AdSmart I suppose?
The only issue with AdSmart (aside from the fact it doesn't currently work on live programming) from everything I read about it is that if you wind back or don't play it at normal speed you don't see the advert you've just seen, but the advert that was actually covered up.

Presumably if somebody saw UHD regional news the same issue would apply, but I dare say by the time we get to that point the technology may have changed.
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Markymark7,096 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
It won't necessarily be a linear offering of course, or if it is it doesn't have to be a simulcast of ITV

I'm sure that in their list of how to do UHD that regional news barely appears on their agenda if at all. I'm not sure what he means about regionality, it could be a number of things. But I doubt they're having big meetings about how they will broadcast Lookaround in UHD


Some people like to forget that ITVs desire to broadcast regional content in HD is nothing to do with the actual programmes, regional news included, and all about maximising their advertising revenue.



I think desire is the wrong word. ITV have unified their regional news production into a 'channel in a box' solution, (something the BBC are still evaluating) so all their regional news facilities are now HD equipped by default, (even if only a sub-set of them are available to receive in HD). Likewise their playout and opting is centralised, and all HD equipped, (it would be madness to have SD/HD mixed currency). Therefore the only impediment now ITV have to have all regions available on all platforms is the cost of emission DTT mux/code, D-Sat mux/code and uplink. Virgin mux/code/dist )
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Markymark7,096 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
I'd rather have ITV HDR than ITV UHD. The picture quality improvement from HD to UHD isn't as drastic as SD to HD for me.


It kind of feels to me that the market for HDR, is the same as that for 5.1 audio. In fact I often wonder when I'm sat watching something with 5.1, if I'm the only person.

Someone told me Sky are able to tell exactly how many people are using Dolby Atmos, because the Sky Q box flags it back to them. On one event it was just 18 people
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VMPhil9,845 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
I'd rather have ITV HDR than ITV UHD. The picture quality improvement from HD to UHD isn't as drastic as SD to HD for me.


It kind of feels to me that the market for HDR, is the same as that for 5.1 audio. In fact I often wonder when I'm sat watching something with 5.1, if I'm the only person.

Someone told me Sky are able to tell exactly how many people are using Dolby Atmos, because the Sky Q box flags it back to them. On one event it was just 18 people

I think the difference there is surround sound audio is a bit of a faff that people can't be bothered with, as it requires ideally an AV receiver with multiple speakers in the right places and you have to sit in the 'sweet spot' to get the most of the effect. HDR is just a new display technology like HD and UHD were and you can readily see the difference.
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Markymark7,096 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
I'd rather have ITV HDR than ITV UHD. The picture quality improvement from HD to UHD isn't as drastic as SD to HD for me.


It kind of feels to me that the market for HDR, is the same as that for 5.1 audio. In fact I often wonder when I'm sat watching something with 5.1, if I'm the only person.

Someone told me Sky are able to tell exactly how many people are using Dolby Atmos, because the Sky Q box flags it back to them. On one event it was just 18 people

I think the difference there is surround sound audio is a bit of a faff that people can't be bothered with, as it requires ideally an AV receiver with multiple speakers in the right places and you have to sit in the 'sweet spot' to get the most of the effect. HDR is just a new display technology like HD and UHD were and you can readily see the difference.


Yes, good point, though for an effective HDR picture you need a screen that can produce both a very bright image, and an inky black one. Most of the 'affordable' models can't, and you need to be spending a four figure amount, which does turn it into more of a niche market. That said, many will just turn up the brightness on their 500 quid screen, and go 'look, HDR', just as 20 years ago many took a 4:3 image and stretched it, saying, 'look, Widescreen'.
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noggin14,546 posts since 26 Jun 2001

It kind of feels to me that the market for HDR, is the same as that for 5.1 audio. In fact I often wonder when I'm sat watching something with 5.1, if I'm the only person.

Someone told me Sky are able to tell exactly how many people are using Dolby Atmos, because the Sky Q box flags it back to them. On one event it was just 18 people

I think the difference there is surround sound audio is a bit of a faff that people can't be bothered with, as it requires ideally an AV receiver with multiple speakers in the right places and you have to sit in the 'sweet spot' to get the most of the effect. HDR is just a new display technology like HD and UHD were and you can readily see the difference.


Yes, good point, though for an effective HDR picture you need a screen that can produce both a very bright image, and an inky black one. Most of the 'affordable' models can't, and you need to be spending a four figure amount, which does turn it into more of a niche market. That said, many will just turn up the brightness on their 500 quid screen, and go 'look, HDR', just as 20 years ago many took a 4:3 image and stretched it, saying, 'look, Widescreen'.


To be honest the benefit of 'inky black' pictures may be slightly overplayed in a domestic environment. Yes it's nice to have more detail in the darker areas of the pictures, but the real USP of HDR is that fewer highlights get clipped and instead carry on getting brighter, giving you detail where previously you'd just have a rolled off clip. Speculars and skies look so much better, even if you don't have perfect inky blacks at the low end. Yes - having darker blacks does make a difference - but I'm not sure that's specific to HDR as it benefits SDR too if you have a display capable of that. (Either using FALD LCD or OLED)

To be honest the 'inky black' thing is more an issue for OLED than FALD LCD as OLEDs don't go that bright, so to get the contrast range required for HDR they have to have better black level performance.

It's interesting that grading is now being done on high-end LCDs as much as OLEDs. (EIZO have a very good LCD display that outperforms the Sony X300 OLED AIUI)
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