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bluecortina504 posts since 26 Jul 2012
YTV and TTT briefly experimented with their own 'breakfast television' service in 1977, with Good Morning Calendar and Good Morning North East being shown at 8.30 - the first ever edition featuring news coverage of the Pan Am/KLM runway collision at Tenerife.


I never understood the timing of Good Morning Calendar and Good Morning North East. Surely the bulk of the audience would have already been on their way to work at 8:30 -- or at least just about to head out the door. Housewives would still be at home, of course, but why not air a morning show at a time when you would reach the largest possible audience?


It was called 'camping' on the hours in a effort to persuade the powers that be that the hours belonged to ITV and they shouldn't really consider a separate breakfast TV service. ITV didn't want competition for the overall advertising 'cake'. Same with overnight telly, with which the ITV companies had greater success. Cynical really.
jackhendo61 posts since 16 Apr 2016


I take it adverts for Look-in didn't count Wink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mc92SwKeY1g


Evidently not, though that's the only example I've seen of a Look-In ad shown on a weekday morning. Central liked to be different, but they stayed within the rules.

Look-In being published by ITV (wasn't it ITPA or similar?) meant it probably wasn't a paid-for ad any more than the 'Full details in TV Times' astons were sponsors, and in the same way Radio Times ads on the BBC weren't really 'ads'.

I assume the various publication annos during schools programmes ("Parents can obtain copies of the Let's Read with Basil Brush books from The Old Library in Margate" and the like) weren't seen as ads, as they were tv tie-in publications. Remember when Redvers used to promote Emmerdale Farm novels after the programme? As late as 1994, Carlton used to promote the Prisoner Cell Block H videocassettes after the episodes. I assume these 'pub annos' were regarded differently to ads, and the ITV company wasn't paid to promote the products? I can see a difference between a pub anno for Emmerdale books, which were published by YTV, and Prisoner videos whose publisher/distributor wasn't linked in any way to ITV or Carlton. Though legally, perhaps there wasn't a difference?


In London as well as TV Times and Look In, you had Capital FM, Capital Gold and Oracle ads which didn't count either. Don't remember any LBC ones though!
IndigoTucker441 posts since 4 Jan 2003
When ITV opened in 1955, shows were broadcast all day - until the dire financial situation kicked in and the daytime schedule was axed. There were daytime serials, magazine shows etc... The more restricted schedule - that lasted until 1972 when the daytime service launched, must have come later.
Neil Jones3,683 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
When ITV opened in 1955, shows were broadcast all day - until the dire financial situation kicked in and the daytime schedule was axed. There were daytime serials, magazine shows etc... The more restricted schedule - that lasted until 1972 when the daytime service launched, must have come later.


News to me, thought they were more restricted than that. Obviously was far later when that happened.

Here's a schedule from November 1955, ATV at the weekend and Associated-Rediffusion during the week.
http://issuu.com/radiosoundsfamiliar/docs/tvtimesnovember1955/15?e=4494401/1465910 (opens at the Monday page, go back a couple of pages for the Sunday schedule)

This is from http://radiosoundsfamiliar.com/the-tv-times-archive-1950s.php to give it its credit.
Hatton Cross2,289 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
..So a typical junction would be, for example, Emmerdale from Leeds, a trail and announcement from Carlisle, ads from Manchester, back to Carlisle for some IVC, then Mr Bean from Carlton.


Small pedantic point, Mr Bean would have come from Central.


Wonder why? Did all former Thames programmes either made or commissioned from an indie, were passed to Central post franchise?

Would have thought play out for ex-Thames shows would have been handled by LWT/LNN
ITV "Occasionally it gives us something good, but for the most part, it is pathetic and puerile". Lord Taylor, House Of Commons, 1959.
Neil Jones3,683 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
Did all former Thames programmes either made or commissioned from an indie, were passed to Central post franchise?

Would have thought play out for ex-Thames shows would have been handled by LWT/LNN


Mr Bean (live action) was made in association with Central in its later years - prior to that it was in association with Thames. I think the last Thames episode was Merry Christmas Mr Bean (which as it turned out became the halfway point of the series) and everything after that was played out by Central.

I believe all the repeats of Mr Bean after Thames ceased broadcasting were also played out by Central.
robertclark125970 posts since 13 Jan 2009
STV Central Reporting Scotland
During the ITV schools on 4 era, I read about an occasion where a programme developed a fault. Now, there were no Channel 4 announcers on shift, they didn't start until 12, but the text said that the programme was faded out after the fault developed. So, what would've been on screen until it was time for the rotomotion device to pop up again?