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noggin12,118 posts since 26 Jun 2001

Couldn't they use the DIRAC or something similar. I don't think a 1.45 Gbps line is necessary. After all they used the DIRAC to send HD feeds from the Beijing back to London and is used for outside broadcasts.


Dirac is in widespread use already. But you wouldn't put a permanent Dirac code/decode in the main network distribution chain. You'd have to switch to an ITV-style system (moving away from network opt-outs and to playout-switching you to line), and just Dirac encode the studio output - and if you are doing that you could use JPEG2000 or any codec. AIUI the BBC are about to switch from Raman provisioned SDI and HD-SDI circuits to BT provisioned circuits - so this may be a moot point anyway.

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Which are really two different things.

Usually a newsroom is split into two main parts: intake and production/output. Intake is newsgathering - getting the stories and footage. Production is taking those stories and making packages and bulletins out of it

Must be one of the difference between the U.K. and the USA. Usually reporters in the field edit using NLE systems either on the laptop or a desktop in the truck while they're there when they will go live on location. They can produce (may not be the right word but I used it initially as they take different parts of video, voice overs and graphics) or edit a package out in the field. With cellular hotspots they can connect to the news system and with some graphics engines (or they have a templates available) from the field.

Are you talking about regional or national reporters. If national - that's not the case in the UK. If you are editing a network package in the field chances are you are working with a shoot/edit (which is a camera operator who can also picture edit)

For regional reports I think 'track and rushes' working still happens (where a reporter will file pictures and voice over back to base to be edited in the newsroom edits) - but obviously laptop editing is an option, and some reporters have basic editing skills. (One option is to file a rough cut back to base to be polished)
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I saw a demo by a station group when their graphics were updating showing how to insert graphics from the field using the Viz engines back at the station. The editing software (I think it was Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Final Cut Pro) has a Viz plugin where they can access all the templates and insert data. They preview the templates, click render and a ZIP file is delivered to them. They then open dozens of images and insert them into the timeline. The finished product could be sent/fed to the station via microwave, satellite or what ever means that their going live and is played out from there after the reporter introduces and tags out the package. In short circumstances it's played out from the camera or from the truck.

[b]Edit[/]: Here's a similar setup demo from the VizRT website.


Yep - Viz will sell you lots of nice and shiny tech. Your eyes will water when you see the cost...
Inspector Sands10,634 posts since 25 Aug 2004
For regional reports I think 'track and rushes' working still happens (where a reporter will file pictures and voice over back to base to be edited in the newsroom edits) - but obviously laptop editing is an option, and some reporters have basic editing skills. (One option is to file a rough cut back to base to be polished)

Though editing in the field happened a long time before laptops using basic two-machine tape edits. Either a machine taken along by the crew he crew or one in the back of a links truck.


Whether it got used and for which story depended on distance the the story was happening or how short notice it was - obviously its quicker to end back or ingest a 3 minute package than a load of rushes. When I worked in regional news sometimes a package was edited 'in the field' purely because there was no edit capacity back at base. Though often the 'field' was a meeting room or sometimes a local pub
Steve in Pudsey7,968 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
In terms of studio upgrades, I wonder if Hull might jump the queue?

I understand that Radio Humberside has been refitted with Vilor despite its Calrec kit only being about 10 years old in connection with Hull being the City of Culture. Not sure whether that was to enable them to install additional studios or just to have shiny new kit there as a PR thing.

I would hope that Leeds was near the front of the queue for its TV studio going HD as it does get seen in BBC Two HD, although sending the SuperLeague Show back across the M62 might be cheaper - I think the first series was made at Oxford Road.
Write that down in your copybook now.
Markymark4,489 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
In terms of studio upgrades, I wonder if Hull might jump the queue?


Word on the street is, (and I think Noggin mentioned it too in here recently?) the Plymouth upgrade, and ViLOR for local radio has prompted a lot of rethinking regarding the technical architecture of the English regions. Remote production and 'IP' cannot be ignored for this sort of application. Which reminds me, isn't there a studio in Aberdeen for BBC Alba that is driven from a gallery at PQ ?

Nottingham was next in line for an upgrade, but it's had a remedial upgrade this autumn I'm told, rather than a 'full works' upgrade
Last edited by Markymark on 11 December 2016 1:17pm
noggin12,118 posts since 26 Jun 2001
For regional reports I think 'track and rushes' working still happens (where a reporter will file pictures and voice over back to base to be edited in the newsroom edits) - but obviously laptop editing is an option, and some reporters have basic editing skills. (One option is to file a rough cut back to base to be polished)

Though editing in the field happened a long time before laptops using basic two-machine tape edits. Either a machine taken along by the crew he crew or one in the back of a links truck.


Whether it got used and for which story depended on distance the the story was happening or how short notice it was - obviously its quicker to end back or ingest a 3 minute package than a load of rushes. When I worked in regional news sometimes a package was edited 'in the field' purely because there was no edit capacity back at base. Though often the 'field' was a meeting room or sometimes a local pub



Editing vans (Network) with multiple Beta SP decks, and Beta SP/SX VTR-laptop edits (Nations that used SX) were in use before PC-laptops - but I didn't see them in English regions.
Inspector Sands10,634 posts since 25 Aug 2004

Editing vans (Network) with multiple Beta SP decks, and Beta SP/SX VTR-laptop edits (Nations that used SX) were in use before PC-laptops - but I didn't see them in English regions.

The region I worked at had the ability to edit DVCam out on the road, though I think at least one of those was owned by a freelance shoot-out.

Though of course DVCam decks are a lot smaller and portable than the above examples and I assume they used the camera as one of the decks
noggin12,118 posts since 26 Jun 2001

Editing vans (Network) with multiple Beta SP decks, and Beta SP/SX VTR-laptop edits (Nations that used SX) were in use before PC-laptops - but I didn't see them in English regions.

The region I worked at had the ability to edit DVCam out on the road, though I think at least one of those was owned by a freelance shoot-out.

Though of course DVCam decks are a lot smaller and portable than the above examples and I assume they used the camera as one of the decks


The DNW-A25P was quite popular at one point. Nice neat integrated edit VTR+Display. Stick two of them together and you have a 2m/c laptop editor with SP and SX replay. (Or there was a cut-down model which was used as a feed recorder and edit player but didn't offer accurate editing) Could bolt on a third for A/B editing (but don't think there was the ability to mix)

http://www.broadcaststore.com/pdf/model/21643/sony_dnwa25______________________________________________________________________________________________.pdf