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Mouseboy331,902 posts since 10 Feb 2014
I'm currently on holiday in the states and TBS have a strange way of starting some shows. Friends is currently on TBS and after one episode ended, the picture shrunk and the opening titles were played in a smaller box as the next episode started.

That is extreme. Not sure when TBS started doing that. But that is very very very very rare to see the titles in a separate box. You used to see alot of the end credits squeezed into a separate box as the box episode starts or re-created. Now they use a black box at the bottom of the screen is the cleaner way of handling that end credits. I hope the TBS thing doesnt spread. Thats dreadful. But these channels are coming up with newer ways into increase revenue in a splintered broadcasting landscape. But more and more people are Netflixing and cord-cutting.
I said what I said!
Hazimworks158 posts since 4 Dec 2013
The theme song for Malaysia's TV3 in circa 1994, including programme and presentation graphics back in the day (also includes a mascot) where I would consider this as my favourite and best period where they have presentation that look more like developed country. Nowadays just look crap in my opinion. The 1990s is the decade I was born and TV3 in the 1990s was the reason I was interested in broadcasting.
Last edited by Hazimworks on 24 March 2017 12:53am
Hazimworks158 posts since 4 Dec 2013
In Brazilian TV, Sao Paulo's TV stations switch off their analog signal on Wednesday night local time. While SBT, Record and RedeTV become pay TV only, which happened days before the analog switchoff in Sao Paulo. The stations use the hashtag #queremoscontinuarcomvc (Queremos continuar com voce; rough translation: we are still here with you).

The analog switchoff is done in stages just like in the UK. The last switchoff before this was in Brasilia, the capital of Brazil.

Maybe Viakenny can shed some light on this. I'm interested in Brazillian TV since last year. Also I'm learning Portuguese.

Rede TV switch off:






There's more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=desligamento+analogica+sao+paulo

Side note, I found out that Sao Paulo is one of the few cities in the world that have almost zero billboards or outdoor advertising.
Last edited by Hazimworks on 30 March 2017 10:24am - 3 times in total
all new Phil2,258 posts since 12 Feb 2005
Granada North West Today
I'm currently on holiday in the states and TBS have a strange way of starting some shows. Friends is currently on TBS and after one episode ended, the picture shrunk and the opening titles were played in a smaller box as the next episode started.

That is extreme. Not sure when TBS started doing that. But that is very very very very rare to see the titles in a separate box. You used to see alot of the end credits squeezed into a separate box as the box episode starts or re-created. Now they use a black box at the bottom of the screen is the cleaner way of handling that end credits. I hope the TBS thing doesnt spread. Thats dreadful. But these channels are coming up with newer ways into increase revenue in a splintered broadcasting landscape. But more and more people are Netflixing and cord-cutting.

Watching TV in the States is like looking after a hyperactive kid who's just had a load of E numbers. It makes me appreciate the pace of our TV here.
I love lamp
1
bilky asko gave kudos
Rkolsen1,388 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
I'm currently on holiday in the states and TBS have a strange way of starting some shows. Friends is currently on TBS and after one episode ended, the picture shrunk and the opening titles were played in a smaller box as the next episode started.

That is extreme. Not sure when TBS started doing that. But that is very very very very rare to see the titles in a separate box. You used to see alot of the end credits squeezed into a separate box as the box episode starts or re-created. Now they use a black box at the bottom of the screen is the cleaner way of handling that end credits. I hope the TBS thing doesnt spread. Thats dreadful. But these channels are coming up with newer ways into increase revenue in a splintered broadcasting landscape. But more and more people are Netflixing and cord-cutting.

Watching TV in the States is like looking after a hyperactive kid who's just had a load of E numbers. It makes me appreciate the pace of our TV here.

E numbers?

What's more in the news side of the things is that many stations start before the hour as a way to keep viewers (and I think the minute or two can help the ratings.). Like my NBC (and many others) station that airs the Ellen Degeneres Show before their evening news starts their 5PM newscast that's listed as a 5PM start actually starts at 4:58. This follows through during a news programming block that has different "shows".
Viakenny244 posts since 6 Oct 2005
BBC World
In Brazilian TV, Sao Paulo's TV stations switch off their analog signal on Wednesday night local time. While SBT, Record and RedeTV become pay TV only, which happened days before the analog switchoff in Sao Paulo. The stations use the hashtag #queremoscontinuarcomvc (Queremos continuar com voce; rough translation: we are still here with you).

The analog switchoff is done in stages just like in the UK. The last switchoff before this was in Brasilia, the capital of Brazil.

Maybe Viakenny can shed some light on this. I'm interested in Brazillian TV since last year. Also I'm learning Portuguese.


Actually, SBT, Record TV and RedeTV! remain available OTA, for free, in São Paulo. The point is that these broadcasters want to be compensated for their signal on pay TV providers (as Globo and Band already are, since their OTA stations - and their respective affiliates - are bundled with their pay channels). So, they established a joint venture, called Simba Content, to sell the three networks' content to pay television providers, linear or otherwise (such as Netflix).

However, providers such as América Móvil (the biggest television provider in the country, operating under the NET and Claro brands), Oi and AT&T-owned Sky Brasil (using the brand under license from Sky plc) think Simba Content is charging too much for them to carry their networks and refused to negotiate with the JV, and pulled their networks in São Paulo, as well as Brasília (where the analog switchoff already happened). Only Telefónica (operating in Brazil under the Vivo brand) was willing to negotiate with Simba, and the three networks remain available on Vivo, for now.

Under Brazilian law, pay television providers are mandated to carry broadcast stations for free, but that rule only applies for analog stations. For their digital and/or HD channels, the stations are free to negotiate with the providers, whether by paying them to be carried or by charging them.

As for the hashtag, #queremoscontinuarcomvc, it actually means #wewant2remainwithu (or, in plain English, "We want to remain with you"), promoted by the three networks to make the viewers pressure their TV providers to negotiate with them so they keep carrying the networks.

Nothing changes in the rest of the country for now. The next region to switch off analog terrestrial TV is the Goiânia area, in late May. Brazil's second-biggest city (and former capital), Rio de Janeiro, is expected to do so by late October.

(And a fun fact, Seja Digital - "Be Digital", or "Go Digital", the entity in charge of the transition to DTT in Brazil, funded by the telecom companies operating here, is located in the very same building as the company I work at.)
1
Hazimworks gave kudos
Viakenny244 posts since 6 Oct 2005
BBC World
Several promos about Simba Content and the dispute with the Brazilian pay television providers.
One introducing the joint venture, featuring SBT, Record TV and RedeTV! talent (and apparently produced by SBT, since it's on their YouTube channel and features the SBT network voice):


A statement about the actual dispute (produced by Record TV and read by Celso Freitas, co-anchor of their flagship newscast):

One small note: the statement mentions Embratel, one of the América Móvil brands in Brazil, but that brand is no longer used for television services, and the company's satellite TV service is now branded "Claro hdtv" (intentionally in lowercase, in line with other Claro-branded services) - cable TV services are branded "NET HDTV" and the Embratel brand is currently used for América Móvil's B2B services.

And a statement about the dispute produced by RedeTV!, featuring Marcelo de Carvalho, the network's VP and minority owner (as well as host of the Brazilian version of the game show, "L'Eredità", called here "O Céu é o Limite", or "The Sky's The Limit"), which became a spokesperson for Simba Content:
1
Hazimworks gave kudos
Hazimworks158 posts since 4 Dec 2013
In Brazilian TV, Sao Paulo's TV stations switch off their analog signal on Wednesday night local time. While SBT, Record and RedeTV become pay TV only, which happened days before the analog switchoff in Sao Paulo. The stations use the hashtag #queremoscontinuarcomvc (Queremos continuar com voce; rough translation: we are still here with you).

The analog switchoff is done in stages just like in the UK. The last switchoff before this was in Brasilia, the capital of Brazil.

Maybe Viakenny can shed some light on this. I'm interested in Brazillian TV since last year. Also I'm learning Portuguese.


Actually, SBT, Record TV and RedeTV! remain available OTA, for free, in São Paulo. The point is that these broadcasters want to be compensated for their signal on pay TV providers (as Globo and Band already are, since their OTA stations - and their respective affiliates - are bundled with their pay channels). So, they established a joint venture, called Simba Content, to sell the three networks' content to pay television providers, linear or otherwise (such as Netflix).

However, providers such as América Móvil (the biggest television provider in the country, operating under the NET and Claro brands), Oi and AT&T-owned Sky Brasil (using the brand under license from Sky plc) think Simba Content is charging too much for them to carry their networks and refused to negotiate with the JV, and pulled their networks in São Paulo, as well as Brasília (where the analog switchoff already happened). Only Telefónica (operating in Brazil under the Vivo brand) was willing to negotiate with Simba, and the three networks remain available on Vivo, for now.

Under Brazilian law, pay television providers are mandated to carry broadcast stations for free, but that rule only applies for analog stations. For their digital and/or HD channels, the stations are free to negotiate with the providers, whether by paying them to be carried or by charging them.

As for the hashtag, #queremoscontinuarcomvc, it actually means #wewant2remainwithu (or, in plain English, "We want to remain with you"), promoted by the three networks to make the viewers pressure their TV providers to negotiate with them so they keep carrying the networks.

Nothing changes in the rest of the country for now. The next region to switch off analog terrestrial TV is the Goiânia area, in late May. Brazil's second-biggest city (and former capital), Rio de Janeiro, is expected to do so by late October.

(And a fun fact, Seja Digital - "Be Digital", or "Go Digital", the entity in charge of the transition to DTT in Brazil, funded by the telecom companies operating here, is located in the very same building as the company I work at.)


The word for OTA/FTA in Portuguese is TV aberta. In Spanish is TV abierta. In German it's Free TV.
Hazimworks158 posts since 4 Dec 2013
That is extreme. Not sure when TBS started doing that. But that is very very very very rare to see the titles in a separate box. You used to see alot of the end credits squeezed into a separate box as the box episode starts or re-created. Now they use a black box at the bottom of the screen is the cleaner way of handling that end credits. I hope the TBS thing doesnt spread. Thats dreadful. But these channels are coming up with newer ways into increase revenue in a splintered broadcasting landscape. But more and more people are Netflixing and cord-cutting.

Watching TV in the States is like looking after a hyperactive kid who's just had a load of E numbers. It makes me appreciate the pace of our TV here.

E numbers?

What's more in the news side of the things is that many stations start before the hour as a way to keep viewers (and I think the minute or two can help the ratings.). Like my NBC (and many others) station that airs the Ellen Degeneres Show before their evening news starts their 5PM newscast that's listed as a 5PM start actually starts at 4:58. This follows through during a news programming block that has different "shows".

It's also in Japan where it's called "flying start". Programs start early at 54 or 58 past the hour. The weekday early evening news start early too, just a few minutes before the hour.
Last edited by Hazimworks on 31 March 2017 3:57am