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Neil Jones5,245 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I suppose play along gameshows were the ideal medium for interactive TV, indeed Challenge were doing that extensively at one point and when Smartphones/tablets came along with their apps, it was a perfect medium.

For interactive fiction, yes it is quite reminiscent of "Choose your own Adventure" and I suppose it can be expensive if you film all the alternate paths that are then not seen. It's documented that Tim Child, creator of Knighmare, used to plan the quests out for that from start to finish across the three levels of the game and behind every door, and of course it had been a complete waste of time planning levels two and three if somebody "died" after three rooms. It was later changed to planning on a per-level basis.
bilky asko5,459 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)

I am secretly and selfishly glad that 3D TV didn’t take off, because although I never had the experience of watching it, I have seen several films at the cinema in 3D and unfortunately I can't really see the effect, if that makes sense. I remember seeing Avatar and only a few elements looked like they had the effect - I was underwhelmed and after seeing other films in the format and trying out the Nintendo 3DS console, it appears that I just don’t ‘see’ 3D very well. Give me UHD and HDR over 3D any day!


If you have amblyopia (lazy eye), for example, then 3D content tends to be underwhelming. If your experience of 3D viewing is anything like mine, you didn't really miss out with 3D TV.

As far as I’m aware, I don’t have any issues with my eyes (yet), which is why I tried 3D so many times.


It's not always something you'd notice, and can go undiagnosed (it's often only detectable with a full eye examination - some who haven't had one as a young child can go their entire lives not realising there's an issue).
Riaz604 posts since 6 Jan 2016
One of the most interesting examples of interactive television is where video material is created with software using variables chosen by viewers. The video isn't pre-created and selected by the viewers but instead it doesn't exist until it is created by the viewers.

However, it's difficult to actually create (the major part of) a TV programme with such a system apart from a display of graphics.
Johnr436 posts since 6 Apr 2004
It's documented that Tim Child, creator of Knighmare, used to plan the quests out for that from start to finish across the three levels of the game and behind every door, and of course it had been a complete waste of time planning levels two and three if somebody "died" after three rooms. It was later changed to planning on a per-level basis.


It seemed to work on how many mistakes the teams made along the way as to how lenient the producers were at allowing them to continue or not! I seem to remember some very questionable survivals including one in the corridor of blades!

I always thought it a bit of a con how the contestants had to be ‘rescued’ at the end of a series no matter if they were in Level 1 or Level 3, shame they couldn’t have edited the show slightly more tighter so all quests could get played to completion (or death!)
Neil Jones5,245 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
It's documented that Tim Child, creator of Knighmare, used to plan the quests out for that from start to finish across the three levels of the game and behind every door, and of course it had been a complete waste of time planning levels two and three if somebody "died" after three rooms. It was later changed to planning on a per-level basis.


It seemed to work on how many mistakes the teams made along the way as to how lenient the producers were at allowing them to continue or not! I seem to remember some very questionable survivals including one in the corridor of blades!


Had more to do with logistics, if somebody falls off a spinner in the first couple of rooms (as happened in one episode) and the next team hasn't arrived in Norwich yet, its probably easier in the long run to give them the benefit of the doubt. Mind you it worked both ways - the way the final (as it turned out) series ended was controversial. The last but one team skipped an entire level (by design) and ultimately won the game.

Quote:
I always thought it a bit of a con how the contestants had to be ‘rescued’ at the end of a series no matter if they were in Level 1 or Level 3, shame they couldn’t have edited the show slightly more tighter so all quests could get played to completion (or death!)


I'm not really sure what is worse, having a quest terminated by the end of the series or having a quest ending naturally and a gap of heaven only knows how long to fill at the end of the final episode of the series. I suppose they didn't know how long the teams were going to be playing for, in the early part of a 16 episode run its relatively arbitrary and I wouldn't be surprised if it was edited as they went along.