« Topics
1234
Riaz614 posts since 6 Jan 2016
BBC's Click has recently celebrated its 1000th episode with an interactive "choose-your-own path" episode. It delves in to the topic of discovering what "television" might be like in the years to come. Do we think broadcasters will be creating more content like this in the future, or is it a waste of time?


It vaguely reminds me of those choose your own adventure books from the 1980s.

The problem with this model for TV are the (high) costs of producing segments of the programme that the viewers do not pick and ultimately are not broadcast. If it reaches a point where only half of the segments are eventually broadcast then such an interactive programme has cost just under twice as much as producing the programme that was broadcast.

Interactive TV was predicted to be the next latest and greatest think back in the late 1990s. Philips was working on some project but it got cancelled. I think that the consumer electronics industry underestimated how popular the internet would turn out at the time.
1
Rkolsen gave kudos
James Vertigan3,232 posts since 2 Jun 2001
London London
My first experience of Interactive television came with Videotron’s Videoway service which I’m pretty sure was the first of its kind in the UK, if not one of the earliest. Like the services today it utilised the fasttext coloured buttons of the Videoway remote. There was some original UK content including collaborations with LNN and Sky and also some content from the Canadian division of Videotron. Also available via the Videoway box were computer games like QBert and and information services like weather and cinema listings.
1
Riaz gave kudos
VMPhil9,823 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
Interactive TV will die out just like 3D did.


I am secretly and selfishly glad that 3D TV didn’t take off, because although I never had the experience of watching it, I have seen several films at the cinema in 3D and unfortunately I can't really see the effect, if that makes sense. I remember seeing Avatar and only a few elements looked like they had the effect - I was underwhelmed and after seeing other films in the format and trying out the Nintendo 3DS console, it appears that I just don’t ‘see’ 3D very well. Give me UHD and HDR over 3D any day!
1
Rkolsen gave kudos
bilky asko5,515 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Interactive TV will die out just like 3D did.


I am secretly and selfishly glad that 3D TV didn’t take off, because although I never had the experience of watching it, I have seen several films at the cinema in 3D and unfortunately I can't really see the effect, if that makes sense. I remember seeing Avatar and only a few elements looked like they had the effect - I was underwhelmed and after seeing other films in the format and trying out the Nintendo 3DS console, it appears that I just don’t ‘see’ 3D very well. Give me UHD and HDR over 3D any day!


If you have amblyopia (lazy eye), for example, then 3D content tends to be underwhelming. If your experience of 3D viewing is anything like mine, you didn't really miss out with 3D TV.
Ash10167 posts since 25 Mar 2018
Meridian (South) South Today
Chucklevision did it in 2008, with an episode featuring Harry Hill.

Back when the BBC had 2 Red Button streams on Freeview. The “interactive scenes” meant the red button feature switched you between the 2 feeds based on your choice.
2
Brekkie and gordonthegopher gave kudos