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noggin14,455 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Multicamera film was never really used in the UK (it's very expensive) - though it was trialled in the 60s as a way of shooting in an internationally compatible way (as 50Hz region 25fps film can be run at 24fps film in 60Hz regions without standards conversion)


I think they shot the first two series of Chef! on multi-camera film, didn't they? Albeit probably 16 mm rather than 35 mm. That's the only UK sitcom example I can think of.


Yes - it may have been - it's never really been a thing here though.
james-20015,086 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
It seems strange how late the video/film combination was used though, it seems rare for any BBC sitcoms even in the late 80s to be all video, and even in the early 90s there were some still using film on location (and OFAH and One Foot In The Grave were still doing it into the 00s!). Ab Fab is a bit strange in that it seemed to mix the two sometimes, even in the same episode. Did seem to affect sitcoms more, there seem to be plenty of BBC dramas using video on location in the 70s and 80s.

Especially when you look at how many ITV sitcoms of the 70s and 80s used video on location, at least occasionally (I guess there were times when using video was impractical with the technology of the time). Strange to see ITV3 showing On The Buses from 1970 with videotaped location work, then seeing episodes of Bread and Brush Strokes from over 20 years later still using film.
Last edited by james-2001 on 12 June 2019 5:52pm
Markymark6,978 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

I think they shot the first two series of Chef! on multi-camera film, didn't they? Albeit probably 16 mm rather than 35 mm. That's the only UK sitcom example I can think of.


Ugh....

I recall that horrendous practice of UK (BBC and ITV) drama and sitcom of being partially studio based with tubed cameras,, and then field production with 16mm negative stock. Either was good quality, but the juxtaposition between them was irritating. Shows based around sketches (eg Dave Allen) didn't suffer from this, because the sketches were all filmed inserts.

If you were to remaster some of these, what approach would you take? Possibly to make the multi-camera studio component look more like film?


Well, some of the recovered from telerecordings Dad’s Armys have ended up with the outdoor native film sequences ‘fluidised’ ( made up word) as part of the recovery process
Spencer For Hire5,866 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
It seems strange how late the video/film combination was used though, it seems rare for any BBC sitcoms even in the late 80s to be all video, and even in the early 90s there were some still using film on location (and OFAH and One Foot In The Grave were still doing it into the 00s!).



Was it definitely film towards the end of One Foot In The Grave's run, or were they using a film effect by then, just to keep the feel of the programme the same? I was actually wondering this recently while watching some of the final series on DVD.

Quote:
Strange to see ITV3 showing On The Buses from 1970 with videotaped location work, then seeing episodes of Bread and Brush Strokes from over 20 years later still using film.



You are Philomena Cunk and I claim my £10.
Robust amateurism
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noggin14,455 posts since 26 Jun 2001

Well, some of the recovered from telerecordings Dad’s Armys have ended up with the outdoor native film sequences ‘fluidised’ ( made up word) as part of the recovery process


That's unusual and definitely unintentional. The team behind the VidFire-ing of Doctor Who, Dads Army etc. are usually incredibly careful to only restore material originally shot on video to a 'video look' and leave the location film sequences alone (and thus retaining their 25p look)

The same team also collaborate on the colour recovery from B&W telerecordings of colour content where the subcarrier dots have survived and can be used to restore colour.
VMPhil9,785 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
It seems strange how late the video/film combination was used though, it seems rare for any BBC sitcoms even in the late 80s to be all video, and even in the early 90s there were some still using film on location (and OFAH and One Foot In The Grave were still doing it into the 00s!).



Was it definitely film towards the end of One Foot In The Grave's run, or were they using a film effect by then, just to keep the feel of the programme the same? I was actually wondering this recently while watching some of the final series on DVD.

Quote:
Strange to see ITV3 showing On The Buses from 1970 with videotaped location work, then seeing episodes of Bread and Brush Strokes from over 20 years later still using film.



You are Philomena Cunk and I claim my £10.

No I think you’re right, OFITG was still using film to the end. I think it worked really well particularly with the more dramatic scenes of the final episode.


Outside sequences on the final Only Fools and Horses specials from 2001-3 were shot on film.
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