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Good Morning Britain

Return to ‘lockdown format’

BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
It's poor timekeeping but actually does it benefit anyone having the headlines at the same point? Headlines 12 minutes late would be handy for anyone tuning in at ten past Seven.

It's the same with News at Ten - sometimes it is quite handy to have it start a few minutes past the hour. FYIW Sky had completed their headline sequence before the BBC had even started theirs last night.
Be nicer and more tolerant to each other. Them's the rules.
JO
Joe
I just listen to the radio.
SW
Steve Williams
It's the same with News at Ten - sometimes it is quite handy to have it start a few minutes past the hour. FYIW Sky had completed their headline sequence before the BBC had even started theirs last night.


That may be the case if it was doing it at that time every morning, but they're not, are they? OK, they did the news at 7.12 yesterday, so I'll get up at 7.10 so I can see it. Oh no, they did it at 7.03 today, so I missed it. What use is that to anyone? The show should be working around what the audience wants, not the other way round.

Also, the comparison when the Ten O'Clock News is a pointless one because regardless of how extended their headlines sequence is, it is clearly still the headlines. When you tune in to Good Morning Britain at seven o'clock and they're blithely sauntering through the showbiz news or in the middle of an interview, should you stay tuned for the headlines? Or have they already done them? Who knows? They're supposed to be giving you information, not making you try and find it.

chris posted:
But I don’t get why timings get some forumers so wound up. If you want a formulaic format, you have the BBC and Sky. Why shouldn’t ITV offer something different, where if a story needs more time they give it?


Well, if ever there was a story that needed more time, they surely had it today - but were talking about something else completely different (and though interesting, clearly less vital) at seven o'clock. If anything it's this show's inflexibility that's the problem, if they look like they're going to sail past the hour (and by some distance) you would think they'd have the wit to shuffle things around. We saw back in February when they did the entire show as an OB from the Oscars, the morning after large and disruptive storms had hit the UK and Covid was becoming a big thing, and they gave them the shortest shrift imaginable to plough on with the Oscar chat. The same is true here, five minutes to the hour is when most news programmes do their fluffiest material and is the first thing that goes when big stories intervene. But they're not doing that, so you end up with all channels covering the top story and Good Morning Britain doing a cat up a tree.

As I say, they're apparently a serious and hard-hitting news programme when they want to be, demanding ministers come on to impart the latest information, but then they're happy to let the news go out of the window if they fancy a chat. As I say, they only have to hit the top of the hour twice in the entire programme. They can do what the hell they like the rest of the time. The Big Breakfast managed to do it, even at its most shambolic. Chris Evans and Chris Moyles managed to do it, even when they were talking for the rest of the hour. I bet they're not so lassez-faire when it comes to hitting the adverts on time. I don't recall Victoria Derbyshire getting a free pass for doing something "different" under the banner of news, either.

Elsewhere on this forum people complain about "filler" (ie, talking about dancing) on Strictly and "waffle" (ie, Richard Ayoade being funny) on The Crystal Maze, as apparently that gets in the way of the serious business. Good Morning Britain arsing around with the showbiz news for several minutes when the audience might be waiting for the main headlines, not a problem apparently.
JE
JonathanE19 Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Just to be devils advocate, is the fact that GMB's on screen graphics (which are by far the most informative) solving this issue and thus allowing the programme to be flexible with it's timescales? The ticker at the bottom provides you with all the headlines and an idea of what the weather will be like.

2 minutes watching that and you're bang up to date with everything they're covering.
LV
LondonViewer London London
Maybe they think most people get a quick round up of the news from their phones & having the headlines at a set time is less important than it once was.
Personally, I’m tuning in for some infotainment and to watch some interviews. I’ve already read the news headlines on the BBC News app.
watchingtv, chris and Spencer gave kudos
SW
Steve Williams
Just to be devils advocate, is the fact that GMB's on screen graphics (which are by far the most informative) solving this issue and thus allowing the programme to be flexible with it's timescales? The ticker at the bottom provides you with all the headlines and an idea of what the weather will be like.


This is the thing, there is so much stuff on the screen, I don't know why they don't use that to actually help navigate through the programme. They can do huge banners for "NEW THIS MORNING" and "DEVELOPING STORY" and pointless captions throughout features, what's stopping them putting "Headlines Next" or "Weather at 6.55" on them? Just making more work for the viewer.

That may be the case if it was doing it at that time every morning, but they're not, are they? OK, they did the news at 7.12 yesterday, so I'll get up at 7.10 so I can see it. Oh no, they did it at 7.03 today, so I missed it. What use is that to anyone? The show should be working around what the audience wants, not the other way round.


They did do it at 7.03 today, by the way.
CH
chris Granada North West Today
Maybe they think most people get a quick round up of the news from their phones & having the headlines at a set time is less important than it once was.
Personally, I’m tuning in for some infotainment and to watch some interviews. I’ve already read the news headlines on the BBC News app.


This. The idea that millions tune into ITV at breakfast time to find out what’s happened is for the birds.
JO
Joe
Steve Williams posted:
OK, they did the news at 7.12 yesterday, so I'll get up at 7.10 so I can see it. Oh no, they did it at 7.03 today, so I missed it.


I'm sorry but I just don't buy that anybody is consuming breakfast TV in this way. Those that watch do it to fill time. You head down for breakfast etc. at 7.18, you leave the house at 7.28, and while you're sat there with your cornflakes you might stick the TV on and watch Good Morning Britain or Breakfast or whatever. I just can't imagine anybody intentionally waking up 5 minutes earlier to catch the headlines in this way. TV at that time fits entirely around what you're already doing, not the other way round.

You might disagree, and that's fine – I could well be wrong and it is what thousands do each day. I'm just saying that I can't see it being the case.
MA
Meridian AM Recently warned Meridian (South) South Today
I don't think viewers are as concerned about all this as you seem to think they might be.

I think that if they really wanted to play the opening titles and read the headlines at precisely :00, they could and would. Is it a rule that they are supposed to be doing it at exactly :00 or any other set time?

GMB is supposed to be different to the more traditional BBC offering and news channels (if it doesn't stand out from its competition, what's the point...?)

Interviews and debates are what the programme is more concerned with, rather than worrying about whether the news headlines from the ticker are read out at a specific time. It's the interviews and debates that get people talking about this programme and that they use to get it noticed on social media.

Audiences who want consistency - knowing they will get news headlines at precisely :00 - should watch Sky News or CNN, etc.
But GMB seems to be working well as it is for its audience.
MA
Markymark Meridian (Thames Valley) South Today
Yes, in fact the first 30 mins of the programme is very rigid timewise. At 6:30 (exactly) it turns into a sort of freeform thing. I agree, given that the Beeb and Sky both adhere to the rigid format, then why not have GMB do it differently. What is refreshing is discussions don't get time limited, if there's still life in them, the participants are not chivied along. The only exceptions seem to be when they suddenly realise they need to get an ad break in, before the end of the clock hour!
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AlfieMulcahy and watchingtv gave kudos
CU
Cusack Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Just out of interest, have Good Morning Britain ever said that they will provide the news headlines at 'the top of the hour'? Or is it just assumed that because it's on at that time of day, it must have the news at that time? As other posters have said, if you are wanting that rigid format, then both the BBC & Sky provide it. ITV are doing something different.

And yes, I have moaned about their slack timekeeping in the past, but I've got over it after I realized that it doesn't matter. If I want the news I watch BBC Breakfast, if I want to see Piers gong mad about stuff, I watch ITV.
Last edited by Cusack on 6 January 2021 1:44pm
TVViewer256, Meridian AM and watchingtv gave kudos
TI
TIGHazard Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Just out of interest, have Good Morning Britain ever said that they will provide the news headlines at 'the top of the hour'? Or is it just assumed that because it's on at that time of day, it must have the news at that time? As other posters have said, if you are wanting that rigid format, then both the BBC & Sky provide it. ITV are doing something different.

And yes, I have moaned about their slack timekeeping in the past, but I've got over it after I realized that it doesn't matter. If I want the news I watch BBC Breakfast, if I want to Piers gong mad about stuff, I watch ITV.


I suppose it is probably due to the fact the previous occupants of the slot - GMTV and Daybreak - did.

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