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Thinker443 posts since 14 Dec 2005

Satellite is an open system, anyone (with a massive amount of money) can put a satellite in the sky and anyone (with considerably less money) can rent transponder space. Anyone can purchase any compatabile equipment to receive satellite transmissions.


However, most satellite viewers are today locked into the closed systems that are the EPGs, which gives the operator a great influence over who gets access. One of the best regulations to ever come out of Ofcom was the one that forced Sky to accept an EPG listing for anyone who wanted to get on the platform. This created a highly accessible market and a proliferation of channels previously unheard of. It is a shame it had to end.


Do British Sky Broadcasting really need to charge for so many of their channels? Face it most channels show adverts.


Its called revenue diversification...
Stuart6,771 posts since 13 Oct 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
I don't think the delivery explanation quite cuts it

I think it does!

Tesco could offer a free bunch of bananas to everyone who enters their stores.

They wouldn't be responsible for any problem you encountered with local transport trying to get there.

Their banana offer would remain free: your problem with accessing it at the store would be a personal issue, and your complaint would be with them, not Tesco.


Do British Sky Broadcasting really need to charge for so many of their channels? Face it most channels show adverts.
Its called revenue diversification...

It's also known as a return on considerable investment over 20 years. BSkyB shareholders waited for more than a decade before they got a decent dividend.
WillPS
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I don't think the delivery explanation quite cuts it

I think it does!

Tesco could offer a free bunch of bananas to everyone who enters their stores.

They wouldn't be responsible for any problem you encountered with local transport trying to get there.

Their banana offer would remain free: your problem with accessing it at the store would be a personal issue, and your complaint would be with them, not Tesco.


But Microsoft would argue they do take responsibility for getting the content from them to you, hence the subscription charge.

The clincher is in the ownership of the equipment - stop paying your Sky or Live Gold subscription, you can still use the equipment as it is yours. Stop paying your VM bill and VM reserve the right to deactivate and/or remove their equipment as it is theirs.
Pete8,960 posts since 18 Jun 2001
STV North Reporting Scotland
They leave the actual cables in place, in case you change your mind and want to go back, or you move out and the new occupants do, so they don't have to do any physical work.

If you're lucky, they'll ask for their box back, but in the three separate occasions I've subscribed to NTL and Virgin, they've never asked me for a set-top box or cable modem back


Which I presume is done on the same basis, in case you change your mind or a new person moves in its probably cheaper to take the odd hit on a lost box than send out a load of new engineers, risk losing people to sky. Certainly many of the student flats up here have a virgin box in "freeview mode" or a clapped out old pace box on a M subscription that was "there when I moved in".
ELM 2011: I am sick of been persicuted by you immature TV Forumers!