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Si-Co2,065 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
The narrative seems to suggest the plane crash took place at Christmas in the storyline, despite it being scheduled on 30th December. There was an outdoor carol service in the episode that played on 28th December, and on the 30th (the same evening in the storyline), Frank Tate was watching carols on the TV prior to delivering a present to Kim at the stables (which she didn’t get until two days later due to what unfolded). A Dickensian night was being held in the Woolpack on the night of the crash, the date of which must surely have been mentioned in previous episodes. Yet on the day after the crash, Frank says to Kim “It’s been a hell of a year”, which could imply it’s New Years Eve. We would need to watch all of the episodes leading up to the crash to get a better idea of the exact date it’s meant to be for the villagers.
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Revitt444 posts since 13 Mar 2007
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
The narrative seems to suggest the plane crash took place at Christmas in the storyline, despite it being scheduled on 30th December. There was an outdoor carol service in the episode that played on 28th December , and on the 30th (the same evening in the storyline), Frank Tate was watching carols on the TV prior to delivering a present to Kim at the stables (which she didn’t get until two days later due to what unfolded). A Dickensian night was being held in the Woolpack on the night of the crash, the date of which must surely have been mentioned in previous episodes. Yet on the day after the crash, Frank says to Kim “It’s been a hell of a year”, which could imply it’s New Years Eve. We would need to watch all of the episodes leading up to the crash to get a better idea of the exact date it’s meant to be for the villagers.


As I say I think the episode with the outdoor carol service is actually 23 December. It's definitely not the same day in the story as the plane crash. With regards to the Dickensian night on the first crash episode one character mentions how odd it is to have it in the lull between Christmas and the new year.
Si-Co2,065 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
The narrative seems to suggest the plane crash took place at Christmas in the storyline, despite it being scheduled on 30th December. There was an outdoor carol service in the episode that played on 28th December , and on the 30th (the same evening in the storyline), Frank Tate was watching carols on the TV prior to delivering a present to Kim at the stables (which she didn’t get until two days later due to what unfolded). A Dickensian night was being held in the Woolpack on the night of the crash, the date of which must surely have been mentioned in previous episodes. Yet on the day after the crash, Frank says to Kim “It’s been a hell of a year”, which could imply it’s New Years Eve. We would need to watch all of the episodes leading up to the crash to get a better idea of the exact date it’s meant to be for the villagers.


As I say I think the episode with the outdoor carol service is actually 23 December. It's definitely not the same day in the story as the plane crash. With regards to the Dickensian night on the first crash episode one character mentions how odd it is to have it in the lull between Christmas and the new year.


Thanks - I missed the reference to The Dickensian evening. It’s been a while since I saw any of those episodes, but I remember Elizabeth throwing out Eric during what I think was a carol service, and I thought it happened in the 28th December episode. I must be wrong. I’ll have to watch the episodes leading up to 30th December again to see if they have the feeling of having been padded out so the crash occurred a couple of episodes later - but that’s the first I’ve heard of the date being changed, and I imagine it wouldn’t have been easy to insert extra footage without affecting the continuity of episodes already in the can (such as the Dickensian reference).

EDIT: Just flicked through the episode labelled as 28th December. It does feature the carol service, and Kathy refers to the fact it’s not yet Christmas. Shirley and Alan refer to the Dickensian evening that’s due to take place between Christmas and New Year. So I can only assume we don’t see Christmas Day in the storyline, it jumps from Christmas Eve or thereabouts (tx 28th December) and a date between Christmas and New Year (tx 30th Dec through to 6th Jan: plane crash evening and following day). By 10th Jan it may be New Years Day, but this isn’t referenced as far as I remember. The few days following the crash go on until mid January at least by tx date.
Last edited by Si-Co on 18 April 2019 11:07pm
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Revitt444 posts since 13 Mar 2007
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
EDIT: Just flicked through the episode labelled as 28th December. It does feature the carol service, and Kathy refers to the fact it’s not yet Christmas. Shirley and Alan refer to the Dickensian evening that’s due to take place between Christmas and New Year. So I can only assume we don’t see Christmas Day in the storyline, it jumps from Christmas Eve or thereabouts (tx 28th December) and a date between Christmas and New Year (tx 30th Dec through to 6th Jan: plane crash evening and following day). By 10th Jan it may be New Years Day, but this isn’t referenced as far as I remember. The few days following the crash go on until mid January at least by tx date.


That episode is definitely set on Christmas Eve (Michael Feldmann refers to Elizabeth throwing Eric out on Christmas Eve several months later) and I think it was in fact broadcast on 23 December because I'm sure there's another episode between that one and the crash, which would have been shown on the 28th.
Si-Co2,065 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
EDIT: Just flicked through the episode labelled as 28th December. It does feature the carol service, and Kathy refers to the fact it’s not yet Christmas. Shirley and Alan refer to the Dickensian evening that’s due to take place between Christmas and New Year. So I can only assume we don’t see Christmas Day in the storyline, it jumps from Christmas Eve or thereabouts (tx 28th December) and a date between Christmas and New Year (tx 30th Dec through to 6th Jan: plane crash evening and following day). By 10th Jan it may be New Years Day, but this isn’t referenced as far as I remember. The few days following the crash go on until mid January at least by tx date.


That episode is definitely set on Christmas Eve (Michael Feldmann refers to Elizabeth throwing Eric out on Christmas Eve several months later) and I think it was in fact broadcast on 23 December because I'm sure there's another episode between that one and the crash, which would have been shown on the 28th.


I did think it odd the storyline jumped from Christmas Eve to (probably) 30th December. Perhaps the uploader has the date incorrect.

According to the Emmerdale Wikia, the episode on 23rd December is 1828, and 28th December is 1828A. Perhaps originally intended to be an hour long and split, or this theory that additional episodes were inserted may hold some water. That said, the detailed synopsis for Ep 1828A on 28th December matches the YouTube upload and ends with the carol singing and Nick and Archie outside the Woolpack.
Last edited by Si-Co on 19 April 2019 3:13am
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james-20014,580 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
I noticed on the newest ITV3 editions, the length of the end credits has shortened slightly, this is around the same time the end credits of Corrie more than halved in length, so I'm guessing the length of credits on ITV as a whole must have been cut in mid-1991?

Means we no longer see the dog run accross the whole length of the bottom of the screen at the end of the credits, can play a game on how far he gets across the bottom of the screen (or if he appears at all) before the endcap cuts up as it changed between every episode.

After being in the US recently though, makes me glad we at least get the proper credits on old shows, many of the channels that repeat old shows over there just have modern credits across the bottom of the final scene, which is quite annoying. And then just go straight into the next show with no break, trailer or ident (but quite often an ad break as soon as the titles are finished). Though most channels over there don't even show the proper credits on new shows either.
Last edited by james-2001 on 22 May 2019 11:48am - 2 times in total
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Si-Co2,065 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
I noticed on the newest ITV3 editions, the length of the end credits has shortened slightly, this is around the same time the end credits of Corrie more than halved in length, so I'm guessing the length of credits on ITV as a whole must have been cut in mid-1991?

Means we no longer see the dog run accross the whole length of the bottom of the screen at the end of the credits, can play a game on how far he gets across the bottom of the screen (or if he appears at all) before the endcap cuts up as it changed between every episode.


Mid 91 sounds about right for the date that ITV shortened closing credits. I’m sure the new rules stated that half hour shows had to have closing credits no longer than 35 seconds, or similar. That said, it was some years later (c 1993/94) that ITV stopped showing the full end credits of Home and Away. I think the rule didn’t extend to imports (some regions were still screening shows like Sons and Daughters with closing credits well over a minute long).

The BBC brought in similar measures - perhaps a little later - they had to shorten the credits on imports too, such as Neighbours (at one point having to edit a 40-second sequence into 35-seconds!)

Interesting observation about the sheep dog. I remember the two police officers on the end of The Bill used to walk completely out of shot prior to end-credit shortening, but thereafter they barely moved down the street!
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JexedBack75 posts since 15 Nov 2016
South East Today
Quote:

The BBC brought in similar measures - perhaps a little later - they had to shorten the credits on imports too, such as Neighbours (at one point having to edit a 40-second sequence into 35-seconds!)


To cut out the sponsorship/product placement credits included in the closing titles