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Christmas TV 2020

VM
VMPhil Granada North West Today
The Vicar of Dibley was a real warm hearted sitcom for me. Loved it a lot, especially the specials in Christmas 1999 leading over the millennium.


It's always been a bit odd of a show though, only having two proper series and the rest specials, and the strange deliberate soft focus that they had on the cameras.

I noted this on Twitter but it's interesting that the iPlayer version of the 2005 New Year's Day episode still has the Make Poverty History scene at the end that the BBC got in trouble for, especially since it's cut completely from the Gold repeats.
MA
Meridian AM Meridian (South) South Today
I hated that soft focus camera. I wonder why they did it like that.
JK
JKDerry UTV Newsline
Apparently the reason for not airing more regular series was down to the availability and willingness of Richard Curtis to write more regular material. He felt it was better writing occasional specials so to ensure the sitcom would continue longer, instead of churning up material over the course of a large number of series.
FA
fanoftv Central (West) Midlands Today
Is that also the thinking with Mrs Brown’s Boys?
GL
Gluben Anglia (East) Look East
Blackadder is the only high-profile sitcom with most of the main cast still alive (Rik Mayall and Patsy Byrne notwithstanding). I think after they tried and mostly failed with Back and Forth in 1999, most of them are reluctant to revive it again, and rightly so in my opinion.
paul_hadley and Cold Open gave kudos
PA
paul_hadley London London
I enjoyed Back and Forth. Memories of watching that in the Dome’s cinema on a couple of occasions.
SJ
sjames Anglia (East) Look East
I don't get the hatred for Back and Forth. Likewise saw it at the Dome, and I'd never seen an episode of Blackadder before, and I really enjoyed it, probably for the time travel element, but it's also funny too. It's a shame the rumoured 5th series seems unlikely to ever happen. Sad
Whataday and paul_hadley gave kudos
JB
JasonB London London

I noted this on Twitter but it's interesting that the iPlayer version of the 2005 New Year's Day episode still has the Make Poverty History scene at the end that the BBC got in trouble for, especially since it's cut completely from the Gold repeats.


And that scene is also on Netflix. It's also the only episode to include the "end credit joke" at the beginning.
Have you washed your hands?
BH
BillyH Founding member London London
I remember being furious at that episode as a 16 year old, it annoyed me so much to have a comedy programme ruined by some long, depressing charity appeal at the end - especially as it was billed as the last ever episode at the time. For those who haven't seen it (and this is going from memories of someone who hasn't watched it since it aired), the episode ends with Geraldine showing everyone a harrowing video of starving Africans, and then the cast all stare into the camera, somberly, wearing Make Poverty History armbands as the camera pans across them. Hence why the Geraldine/Alice joke is at the start instead.

There's a bit near the start where Jim reads a poem about the cause ("No, no no....no more") which just about works if still a bit jarring, but with that ending it went way too far and essentially turned into a promotional advertisement for Richard Curtis's campaign, something you're not particularly wanting on New Years Day if you intended to just watch a fun bit of comedy.
Member since 26 May 2001
paul_hadley and buster gave kudos
JO
Johnr
It always seemed odd to have it in the episode rather than as a piece for Comic Relief / Children In Need

My favourite moment that I've never forgotten is No-no-no-el Edmonds and No-no-no-DEAL Very Happy
LL
London Lite Founding member London London
Is that also the thinking with Mrs Brown’s Boys?


I think in the case of MBB, it was to allow the cast and crew to go on their lucrative tour during the rest of the year.

The three series with the BBC ensured their popularity in the UK and Australia/NZ in addition to Ireland, so they'd easily make more money from tours than doing a six episode run, which would allow them to film Christmas specials instead.
AR
Argybargy Granada North West Today
It was my understanding that they didn't have time to film a series due to touring commitments. So, that being the case, how come they still manage to find the time to film 6 one-hour episodes of All Round To Mrs Brown's each year?

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