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Childrens TV

OFCOM shows some mettle (July 2018)

EX
excel99 Yorkshire Look North (E.Yorks & Lincs)
1952 was Sooty's TV debut

Last series was 2013. New episodes were filmed earlier this year as per the Sooty twitter/facebook
www.airhumberside.cjb.net
JA
james-2001 Central (East) East Midlands Today
I wonder how Sooty would have gone if Thames didn't lose their franchise. The change from The Sooty Show to Sooty and Co was down to them moving production to Granada, I imagine The Sooty Show would have stayed on if Thames had won (and so would Rainbow, probably).
BR
Brekkie Recently warned Wales Wales Today
A movie is due apparently.
Turns out nobody had 2020 vision.
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member Central (West) Midlands Today
I wonder how Sooty would have gone if Thames didn't lose their franchise. The change from The Sooty Show to Sooty and Co was down to them moving production to Granada, I imagine The Sooty Show would have stayed on if Thames had won (and so would Rainbow, probably).


I'm not convinced it would have lasted much longer - I can't remember when ITV finally got rid of that unique slot at about ten past twelve where Rainbow and some other stuff resided for ages but it wasn't too far away from when Thames lost its franchise IIRC and I suspect that when that disappeared, Rainbow would have gone with it anyway. If it were still running today it would probably be an indie production from Thames or whoever and aired on CBeebies.

Re: Sooty, I suspect it would have just been more of the same with refreshed visuals and titles and what not, after all the bear had been at Thames since the 1960s and even by the 1990s standard it wouldnt have stayed on the air all that time if it wasn't successful. It running after 1993 from Thames may have just delayed Matthew Corbett's retirement and eventual sale of Sooty to Richard Caddell or even somebody else.
NW
nwtv2003 Granada North West Today
I wonder how Sooty would have gone if Thames didn't lose their franchise. The change from The Sooty Show to Sooty and Co was down to them moving production to Granada, I imagine The Sooty Show would have stayed on if Thames had won (and so would Rainbow, probably).


Technically it was ‘Sooty Films’ that made Sooty and Co for Granada, but Granada at the time had a lot of control with the programme too, especially with video sales. I get the feeling they’ve made more episodes of Sooty within the last couple of years, but it’s not often shown later than 6:00am on weekends these days.

Re Sooty and Thames, if they had carried on I reckon Thames would have just carried on producing it. But certainly when Matthew retired and sold Sooty I guess could have been different, but who knows. To be fair to the bear he has survived moving channels, franchise losses and different owners and he’s still on the telly. Not bad for a 70 year old...
steve
steviegTVreturns
WH
Whataday Founding member Wales Wales Today
Sooty Films was a vanity credit for the company that owned the Sooty brand. Granada produced Sooty & Co.
NW
nwtv2003 Granada North West Today
Sooty Films was a vanity credit for the company that owned the Sooty brand. Granada produced Sooty & Co.


Thanks for the clarification. Remember from Sooty & Co they always made good use of Granada’s Studios, and any Granada talent who happened to be nearby.
steve
steviegTVreturns
:-(
A former member
I wonder how Sooty would have gone if Thames didn't lose their franchise. The change from The Sooty Show to Sooty and Co was down to them moving production to Granada, I imagine The Sooty Show would have stayed on if Thames had won (and so would Rainbow, probably).


I'm not convinced it would have lasted much longer - I can't remember when ITV finally got rid of that unique slot at about ten past twelve where Rainbow and some other stuff resided for ages but it wasn't too far away from when Thames lost its franchise IIRC and I suspect that when that disappeared, Rainbow would have gone with it anyway. If it were still running today it would probably be an indie production from Thames or whoever and aired on CBeebies.


September 1993, All ITV did was moved it to 3.30. Mind you by that time more new programmes had appeared like Tots TV and The Riddles.
JA
james-2001 Central (East) East Midlands Today
The Riddlers had been around since 1989.
NT
NorthTonight North Reporting Scotland
Rainbow et al were moved from 12.10 to 11.10 when ITV Daytime started in 1987. This meant the end of the ten minute programme that used to be on at noon. Although most of them were repeated in the afternoon. I think that when This Morning began a year later, the programmes were moved back to 12.10. Think they only lasted a year or so after that in the lunchtime slot.
RI
Riaz
Anything if presented inappropriately can become a "not conventional genre" for children's TV. Minecraft is unfortunately part of the scene now and is probably no more unconventional than Gamemaster was.


Can children's TV be looked at in isolation if there is some overlap with other genres? There are certain adult programmes that are / were quite popular with children including wildlife programmes and some documentaries and dramas. There were also the BBC / ITV / C4 schools programmes. Although some people argue that they were intended to be watched at school rather than at home they were designed with children as their audience. I'm not sure if any research had been carried out on how many older children / younger teenagers in the late 1990s and early 2000s crashed out in front of History Channel / Discovery / National Geographic when they got home from school rather than watched CBBC / CITV / programmes specifically intended for their age group. Was there a potential loss of viewers for more traditional children's programmes there or not? There is some anecdotal evidence that the programmes that kids want to watch have polarised towards cartoons, some adult programmes, subculture programmes on YouTube that don't appear on TV - like Minecraft, and stuff to help with homework since 2000ish and many more traditional children's programmes have lost the audiences that they once had.

Quote:
I hardly think the world's going to cave in just because nobody can remember a TV show that went out in 1999. The more likely explanation is that by this point and the explosion in TV channels and their need for content both new and old means there is SO much content out there and more being made every day that nobody will see anywhere near probably half of it in their lifetime. This situation will only get worse as time and more content is created.


This was an era before YouTube and the block programming on BBC1 and ITV1 on weekday afternoons and Saturday mornings still ruled. I'm not talking about a couple of obscure programmes that I remember but nobody else does but a sizeable number and I haven't even got a complete list of children's programmes yet.

Good TV programmes never die. They are still talked about even if the master tapes were wiped decades ago. The late 1990s and early 2000s could have been a stab in the dark for producers of children's TV as it was harder to clearly identify what kids would and wouldn't want to watch or which programmes would be memorable and which would be forgotten. Do producers of children's programmes, or CBBC and CITV bosses, ever do internet searches to try and assess which of their previous programmes are memorable and which are forgotten?
RI
Riaz
As a rule, no.


If this is true then it doesn't bode well for this discussion Sad

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