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Brexit: Will leaving EU impact on broadcasting?

(June 2016)

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JA
JAS84
The EBU started in 1950, the EU in 1957. So it predates it, but not by 20 years.

And if only EU countries could enter Eurovision, that means that Russia and Australia couldn't enter, among others. There are 28 EU countries, and 42 countries took part in this year's Eurovision.
TH
Thinker
Most things related to television are regulated by the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD). After Brexit, the UK can decide to opt out of these regulations if it wants to, although UK law is often already above the thresholds set in the AVMSD. Cross-border television is also affected by the European Convention on Transfrontier Television, issued by the Council of Europe and ratified by the UK.

At the moment, any channel broadcasting from any EU country can target its broadcasts to any other country and still only be subject to regulation by the originating country. If the European Convention protects that right, the broadcasters may be able to carry on, although I personally don't know if that is the case.

One interesting aspect would be European content quotas. The AVMSD sets up minimum quotas for the amount of "European works" a broadcaster has to include. At the moment it is set at 10 percent for TV channels, which makes it inconsequential for most major European broadcasters. One of the last proposed changes to EU law before the Brexit vote was a change to the AVMSD so that it would also extend to on demand services, such as Netflix. Under the new rules, on demand services would have to provide at least 20 percent European works. Netflix said they already complied with this by providing 21 percent European content.

If UK content is no longer considered as "European works", it could potentially be squeezed out as US-owned on demand services scramble to fill the Euroquota with stuff from other countries. Although if UK content is still considered European, things would presumably not change as pertains to quotas.
bkman1990, harshy and Brekkie gave kudos
RI
Riaz
The effects of Brexit on broadcasting have been overlooked by both the leave the EU and remain in the EU camps during the run up to the referendum.

Take into account that - despite as much legislation as can be formulated - TV programmes are very much a cultural and linguistic product. There isn't the same type of consumer market for TV programmes across the EU as there is in the US.

It might be logical to break down the situation into problematic issues surrounding the sales of programmes from a producer in Britain to a TV channel in another EU country or vice versa, and TV channels which are broadcast in both Britain and other EU countries.
DB
dbl
Well considering the Brexit camp have no plan so far, I'm not exactly surprised.
Last edited by dbl on 26 June 2016 7:13pm
BK
bkman1990
One thing I understand about Freeview & Freesat is that the reach of their signal is unaffected into the ROI. But I do have some concern about the hardware specifications from these platforms including hardware from Sky & VM.

Do all of these platforms have to comply with specifications that is line with EU law (AVMSD) or other European broadcasting arrangements?

What happens if these british businesses are made independent. Will they still have to observe EU rules when they leave for good?

Also The Guardian is reporting that ITV lost £2.5bn in value in the stock market since the Brexit vote.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jun/27/itv-sees-almost-25bn-wiped-from-stock-market-value-after-brexit

Newspapers are also taking big hits in value since the vote.
DE
deejay
Oh here we go again, trying to explain the difference between the EBU and the Eurovision Song Contest and now also the difference between them and the EU...

The EBU is a union of radio and television broadcasters. Active members broadcast within the European Broadcasting Area (EBA) or are members of the Council of Europe, and are often public service broadcasters. Active members must subscribe to set technical criteria.

Associate members may be based outside the EBA and/or don't fulfil all technical criteria laid down by the EBU.

There are 73 active members in 56 countries and 34 associate members from a further 20 countries.

The EBU's highest profile event is of course the song contest, but it also produces other television and radio programmes shared between broadcasters as required. The EBU also runs news and sport 'exchange' networks, which allows member broadcasters to share material. The EBU works on behalf of members to secure the broadcasting rights of very high profile events, notably The Olympics.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Broadcasting_Union

Back on topic ---

The U.K. Broadcasters who are members of the EBU (and that's the BBC, United Kingdom Independent Broadcasting, Channel 4 and S4C) aren't going to be made to leave the EBU because of Brexit, it's entirely unrelated. I doubt there'd be noticeable change on air, in terms of seeing bureaux for newsgathering in places like Berlin, Paris etc. Now, should the uk revisit the idea of splitting into separate nations then there would be great potential for massive change in the BBC and ITV structure. Again, a separate issue, and potentially a much more dramatic one.

I suppose Production of content by uk broadcasters could increase in cost as a result of many things changing including foreign exchange rates, cost of importing technical equipment etc. Production of content within the uk by other broadcasters (or filmmakers) could also be hit by increased costs.
RI
Riaz
What hasn't been mentioned are that the two main centres of broadcasting in England - London and Manchester - voted strongly to remain in the EU whereas the majority by far of the rest of England voted to leave the EU. Now I'm wondering how this division will be reflected in broadcasting in the future. It has been put, rather bluntly, that the referendum reveals that England is split between a Metropolitan Elite and the common folk from the provinces. How different would the situation be in broadcasting if there was still a regional ITV as attitudes towards the EU could vary from company to company?
NJ
Neil Jones Founding member
Riaz posted:
What hasn't been mentioned are that the two main centres of broadcasting in England - London and Manchester - voted strongly to remain in the EU whereas the majority by far of the rest of England voted to leave the EU. Now I'm wondering how this division will be reflected in broadcasting in the future. It has been put, rather bluntly, that the referendum reveals that England is split between a Metropolitan Elite and the common folk from the provinces. How different would the situation be in broadcasting if there was still a regional ITV as attitudes towards the EU could vary from company to company?


Would probably make absolutely sod all difference, the major campaigns were mostly on the national news.
Remember that news has to be impartial and if a company reports on Fred from the Leave campaign being in the area, they should also report equally on Daphne from the Remain campaign as close as possible.

Much like when elections are looming, you hear Fred from the X party did, Daphne from the Y party, and meanwhile Velma and Shaggy from the Z party did this, that and the other.

I don't see what difference an old school regionalised ITV would have made to the referendum if I'm honest.
JA
jackhendo
double post
JA
jackhendo
I wonder what the Brexit result could mean for the British owned TV or Production companies? They have lost value on the stock market, and due to the fall in the pound, appear cheaper to acquire by foreign companies than they were last week.
BR
Brekkie
Cheaper but probably less attractive too.
RI
Riaz
How does not being a member of the EU affect broadcasting in Switzerland?

It has been common for Swiss viewers to watch TV channels in adjacent countries and viewers in adjacent countries to watch Swiss TV channels for decades, and more recently TV channels from Switzerland and surrounding countries have been available on satellite for all to watch. Switzerland has also had a more developed cable TV infrastructure long before cable TV become readily available in Britain.

Has this resulted in very similar regulatory regimes for EU countries and Switzerland?

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