« Topics
1234...113114115116
ToasterMan (previously BeanosOnToast) 209 posts since 17 Feb 2016
Granada North West Today
It also lets shows develop and then feed into BBC1, rightly or wrongly. Without BBC2 we'd probably not have Peaky Blinders and Line of Duty.


The more I think about it, it dates back to as early as 1983, when Play School moved to BBC One in the mornings, (coinciding with its overhaul), whereas before it was repeated in the afternoon strand, and after Play Away's axing, BBC Two was deprived of regular children's programming until the See-Saw strand moved to there in June 1987.

Have I Got News for You?, which premiered in its first decade on Two, this October, marks twenty years since new episodes began premiering on BBC One.

Yes, daytime is a bit weak with it being too reliant on simulcasting the news channel, but before that all it did was show CBeebies / CBBC most of the morning anyway, so it isn't much different. Afternoons were weakened when content went to BBC1 but I think they've kind of established what they do in the afternoons now so it doesn't come across as much as filler as it used too. Personally for me BBC2 has been stronger than BBC1 in primetime in recent years - but I don't think one would work without the other.


Even so, ITV's always been one step ahead of the BBC in daytime: they have their mix of chat shows: (This Morning and Loose Women) and have really made it up in the late afternoon for the loss of the CITV strand in 2007, with game shows like Tipping Point and The Chase: quintessential teatime viewing, (though the Beeb did respond with Pointless on BBC One in 2012).
JetixFann450745 posts since 25 Mar 2013
STV Central Reporting Scotland
BBC Staffer moves .....




And of course, the Times are reporting now that BBC Four "may be" in risk of closing. Twitter's in a slight uproar regarding it. The worst part is that there's no evidence of this from any BBC sources, so it may just be fear-mongering.



Do you even read these?
all new Phil3,746 posts since 12 Feb 2005
Granada North West Today
As an aside, I do think the closure of BBC Three was a massive error. The message it sent out to the younger audience was that they just don't matter. BBC Four's output could easily be folded into BBC Two. (From whence it came, really.)

Unfortunately, a large amount of BBC4’s audience expects their niche interests to be catered for whatever the cost, despite being well catered for elsewhere (ie Sky Arts, endless documentary channels, actual theatres and concert halls). The BBC3 audience, on the other hand, only really has significantly lower quality content produced for them elsewhere.
I love lamp
6
Jeffmister, Rexogamer and 4 others
  • jonO
  • JetixFann450
  • AndrewPSSP
  • ToasterMan
gave kudos
JetixFann450745 posts since 25 Mar 2013
STV Central Reporting Scotland
As an aside, I do think the closure of BBC Three was a massive error. The message it sent out to the younger audience was that they just don't matter. BBC Four's output could easily be folded into BBC Two. (From whence it came, really.)

Unfortunately, a large amount of BBC4’s audience expects their niche interests to be catered for whatever the cost, despite being well catered for elsewhere (ie Sky Arts, endless documentary channels, actual theatres and concert halls). The BBC3 audience, on the other hand, only really has significantly lower quality content produced for them elsewhere.

I think the real issue to bringing that audience back to the BBC is that you have to convince them that content is still being produced for them and them directly. There sort of needs to be a big publicity towards the brand and unfortunately, I don't see many people referring to shows like Fleabag or This Country as "BBC3" shows but rather only iPlayer shows.


On many Twitter posts, I see people mentioning "Why don't you merge BBC3 and BBC Four?" and although it sounds ingenious on paper, I don't see that working logistically. Certain shows are targetting an audience, but by clashing an older generation with a new teenager audience, it simply just confuses both. I'd love to see a Red Button feed sacrificed instead of BBC Four if they are wanting to bring BBC3 back, since all those feeds are ever used for are special events and sports, so by still airing those on BBC Three, the public know where to go for events they are interested in, plus good programming for a younger and much more focused generation, since the BBC doesn't even need to try to attract older audiences since they already get them quite easily.
Do you even read these?
ethanh05535 posts since 2 Apr 2017
HTV Wales Wales Today
As an aside, I do think the closure of BBC Three was a massive error. The message it sent out to the younger audience was that they just don't matter. BBC Four's output could easily be folded into BBC Two. (From whence it came, really.)

Unfortunately, a large amount of BBC4’s audience expects their niche interests to be catered for whatever the cost, despite being well catered for elsewhere (ie Sky Arts, endless documentary channels, actual theatres and concert halls). The BBC3 audience, on the other hand, only really has significantly lower quality content produced for them elsewhere.

I think the real issue to bringing that audience back to the BBC is that you have to convince them that content is still being produced for them and them directly. There sort of needs to be a big publicity towards the brand and unfortunately, I don't see many people referring to shows like Fleabag or This Country as "BBC3" shows but rather only iPlayer shows.


On many Twitter posts, I see people mentioning "Why don't you merge BBC3 and BBC Four?" and although it sounds ingenious on paper, I don't see that working logistically. Certain shows are targetting an audience, but by clashing an older generation with a new teenager audience, it simply just confuses both. I'd love to see a Red Button feed sacrificed instead of BBC Four if they are wanting to bring BBC3 back, since all those feeds are ever used for are special events and sports, so by still airing those on BBC Three, the public know where to go for events they are interested in, plus good programming for a younger and much more focused generation, since the BBC doesn't even need to try to attract older audiences since they already get them quite easily.


The problem with getting rid of the red button feeds are that, okay sure, you could put it on iPlayer or online. But not everyone has access to the iPlayer - and these are still essential feeds during the likes of the Olympics and Wimbledon, and if anything they should be used more.

If I may float a suggestion - merge BBC News and BBC Parliament.
Shouldn't you be at home?
Larry the Loafer5,788 posts since 2 Jul 2005
Granada North West Today
I've never seen a reason not to fold BBC Four into BBC Two, especially given how BBC Two's purpose seems to be fading away more and more, not least because of shows like Top Gear being pinched by BBC One, and the content BBC Four shows was once at home on BBC Two.
3
AndrewPSSP, ToasterMan and JetixFann450 gave kudos
Inspector Sands14,796 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I've never seen a reason not to fold BBC Four into BBC Two, especially given how BBC Two's purpose seems to be fading away more and more, not least because of shows like Top Gear being pinched by BBC One, and the content BBC Four shows was once at home on BBC Two.

That point has been made many times and it's not really true, a lot of what BBC Four has commissioned and shown would never have been on BBC Two. A lot is too niche and too low budget to ever have got a commission on BBC Two. One of the things that the channel is most famous for - its scandi-dramas certainly wouldn't have got a look in
7
Jeffmister, AndrewPSSP and 5 others
  • Rexogamer
  • Steve Williams
  • VMPhil
  • Cando
  • tightrope78
gave kudos
Neil Jones6,441 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I must agree, a lot of what is now on BBC Four wouldn't have seen the light of day on BBC Two.
Sky Arts is probably the closest to it in the commercial sector, but that goes more towards performing arts - theatre, music, opera and that sort of thing - whereas Four tries to be more inclusive on a wide range of things. And it gave us Only Connect, which is the sort of show that's quite hard to get on mainstream TV as it is, so it was perfect for BBC Four, and something new for them, which worked out pretty well actually for all involved.
1
tightrope78 gave kudos
VMPhil10,389 posts since 31 Mar 2005
Granada North West Today
I've never seen a reason not to fold BBC Four into BBC Two, especially given how BBC Two's purpose seems to be fading away more and more, not least because of shows like Top Gear being pinched by BBC One, and the content BBC Four shows was once at home on BBC Two.

That point has been made many times and it's not really true, a lot of what BBC Four has commissioned and shown would never have been on BBC Two. A lot is too niche and too low budget to ever have got a commission on BBC Two. One of the things that the channel is most famous for - its scandi-dramas certainly wouldn't have got a look in

Agreed. I really think people who suggest it would be easy to merge the two channels do the both of them a disservice.