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BBC Scotland thread

(July 2015)

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SO
SOL
Jeez that is a lot of work, Denton!

The nation CAs are definitely value for money with all the technical work that is carried out behind the scenes. I wonder why other broadcasters don't adopt the same method of playout, using continuity announcers as directors as well.
DE
denton
It is a lot of work, ironically easier in some ways when there is more local content than network content.
BFBS do work in a similar way, or at least did when I visited about 16 years ago.
I remember someone telling me once that a Canadian channel did too... Can't remember what channel though.
GL
globaltraffic24
BBC One NI and BBC Two NI are run by one person each per shift!

The role involves schedule prep and previewing, technical playout of the schedule (trails, programmes, idents, stills, credit squeezes, subtitles, etc), editorial control of the schedule (deciding what to drop/add often at the last second to cope with programme overrun/underruns), scripting and live announcing, recording of lines/outside sources for shifting to later in the day or week, routing of sources, lines recording of as-live trails, ingesting late arriving programmes to server for TX, media management of network trails for local playout, giving on air and off air times to studios and OBs, and talking to members of the public on tours of the building.


And therein lies the rub. I don't promote cuts for the sake of it (My name isn't George Osborne) but why is all of this not automated?! TV in the UK appears to be years behind radio. Most radio stations take network output with localised content including links, ads and local news and it is all automated at non-peak times.
DE
denton
Because they're reactive TV channels run by a national broadcaster, not local radio opt outs.
SO
SOL
I would hate automation. I prefer live announcements where a human can react to faults. I've watched a few digital stations that have went blank for ages, with no slide and nobody to tell you what's happening.

Some stations are 'semi' automated, STV being one of them, I assume ITV is as well.
:-(
A former member
SOL posted:
I would hate automation. I prefer live announcements where a human can react to faults. I've watched a few digital stations that have went blank for ages, with no slide and nobody to tell you what's happening.

Some stations are 'semi' automated, STV being one of them, I assume ITV is as well.


I was strongly made clear ITV is not and is live at all time, STV is live from 18pm - just after midnight,
IS
Inspector Sands
SOL posted:
I would hate automation. I prefer live announcements where a human can react to faults.

They aren't mutually exclusive things - there isn't a TV station that doesn't use automation to play out it's content. Some have live announcements, some pre recorded ones, some none at all. But that isn't anything to do with automation.


Quote:
Some stations are 'semi' automated, STV being one of them, I assume ITV is as well.

Every major TV station will have a playout system that is manned by someone, although not necessarily one person per channel. The levels of intervention vary, both through technical and editorial limitations
SO
SOL
SOL posted:
I would hate automation. I prefer live announcements where a human can react to faults. I've watched a few digital stations that have went blank for ages, with no slide and nobody to tell you what's happening.

Some stations are 'semi' automated, STV being one of them, I assume ITV is as well.


I was strongly made clear ITV is not and is live at all time, STV is live from 18pm - just after midnight,


I meant with playout, not announcements
SO
SOL
SOL posted:
I would hate automation. I prefer live announcements where a human can react to faults.

They aren't mutually exclusive things - there isn't a TV station that doesn't use automation to play out it's content. Some have live announcements, some pre recorded ones, some none at all. But that isn't anything to do with automation.


Quote:
Some stations are 'semi' automated, STV being one of them, I assume ITV is as well.

Every major TV station will have a playout system that is manned by someone, although not necessarily one person per channel. The levels of intervention vary, both through technical and editorial limitations


True, but a couple of the digital channels I've watched that were blank screens for minutes during a fault are much slower to react than the Beeb would. Even STV has been slow during faults on nighttime programmes.
BR
Brekkie
Presumably the nations are already networked at certain off-peak times - i.e. overnight. If Breakfast goes off air would we usually get a network or nations announcement?
DE
denton
It would depend on the nature of the fault that had taken Breakfast off air and the amount of available information as to what had gone wrong, and the length of time it was taking network to respond to the situation.
DE
denton
So..... If the main circuit from Salford to Red Bee had gone down, but the reserve was fine... It's likely network would respond very quickly by cutting to the reserve.
If Salford had a major power failure which they couldn't recover from, network is likely to go to holding routine (caption and apology)... If network doesn't respond quickly (for whatever reason) then the Nations are likely to respond with their own holding routines.

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