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BBC Power Failure

(July 2001)

BB
BBC Choice
I think the BBC's breakdown and Ceefax music are great!! Really groovy in places! BBC Choice's (not mine, the channel!) was the best - I think it's the same as CBBC use when they break down.

Notice though that the muzak was tailored for the content of each channel:
BBC One had the contempory tunes, BBC Two had 1970s-sounding organ music (appropriate for I Love 1975), BBC Choice's was really modern and FUNKY! and Knowledge's was more classical. Very good!
IT
itsrobert Founding member Granada North West Today
Damn, I wish News 24 had displayed a screen and used music, as it would have probably been a BBC News 24 Remix!!
PE
Pete Founding member STV North Reporting Scotland
Quote:
itsrobert Posted on 10:30 pm on July 4, 2001
Damn, I wish News 24 had displayed a screen and used music, as it would have probably been a BBC News 24 Remix!!

Do you mean the 10 minute one?
TP
Techy Peep Founding member
It's highly unlikely that News 24 would play music if something happened. If they are capable of broadcasting a caption and music, they are capable of broadcasting a tape.

News 24 as I'm sure you all know do their own presentation, ie no presentation department. If the studio goes off air completely there is no-one to rescue them.

As such, if something did happen, you're more likely to see a blank screen than anything else. Perhaps after a while you might see a testcard or caption which would be inserted somewhere else, possibly by those lovely BT or NTL folk.
DA
Davidjb Founding member Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
Notice how news 24 record some of their news bulletins now so if there are any problems we still see recorded n24 rather than world.
TP
Techy Peep Founding member
everythings recorded on a continuous loop these days, so if anything happens they just cut up the loop.

'News24, 24hours a day', except when there's power cuts! he he Smile
CA
cat
The BBC spent hundreds of thousands of pounds of licence payers' money last year awarding its top staff bonus payments and giving lavish pay-offs to senior staff who found jobs elsewhere.

The corporation's annual report, published yesterday, lists an array of salary top-ups, including 91,000 for the director general, Greg Dyke, in addition to his 347,000 salary. His senior lieutenants were also given big bonuses by the BBC board, chaired by Sir Christopher Bland, an old friend of Mr Dyke from their days together at ITV.

The head of finance, John Smith, received a 64,000 bonus; Mark Byford, head of the World Service, was given 69,000; Jenny Abramsky, head of BBC Radio, received 42,000; and Alan Yentob, head of BBC films, drama and children's programmes, got 52,000. Large pay-offs were also made to colleagues of the former director general, John Birt, even though most of them resigned to go to other well-paid jobs rather than work under the new regime.

Tony Hall, who left as head of news to go to the Royal Opera House, received 24,539; Patricia Hodgson, who went to run the Independent Television Commission, was given a 70,489 golden goodbye.

The corporation's top PR man, Colin Browne, head of corporate affairs, joined the big pay-off recipients when he resigned in March 2000, taking 288,954. Matthew Bannister, head of marketing, resigned with a 199,550 pay-off.

However, Mr Dyke admitted yesterday that viewing figures for BBC1 had gone down last year, as had the viewing audience share. He blamed the extra channels available to viewers switching to digital TV.

Sir Christopher defended the bonus payments. When asked to justify them, he said: 'There is a selection of criteria. These are weighted payments. The targets include the reach of our various channels. Most modern organisations now pay bonuses. The BBC is quite right to do this. It is in line with the best practice.'

He added that it would be 18 months before audiences felt the benefit of new investment in BBC1.


-- Today's Independent...

WHY?!
What has Dyke done to deserve all that extra cash!?
And notice the 18 months thing... basically in 18 months we will have all forgotten about this so the fact that they have spent millions will not be noticed, it's all a con I tell you Smile
NS
NickyS Founding member
cheshirec posted:
And notice the 18 months thing... basically in 18 months we will have all forgotten about this so the fact that they have spent millions will not be noticed, it's all a con I tell you Smile

I'm surprised you haven't picked up on the cost of News 24 ... 48 million
compared to 922 million for BBC1, 202 million for regional TV, 69 million for 5 Live, 52 million for BBC Online and 3 million for BBC Parliament.
HA
harshy Founding member
How much does BBC World cost to run?
PZ
pzg Founding member
Quote:
How much does BBC World cost to run?


BBC World loss in 2000/2001 was 18.3m versus 11.4m in 1999/00 (Source: BBC Worldwide)

BBC World(m) 2001 2000
-----------------------------------------------------
Turnover 26 19
Cost of Sales (25) (26)
-----------------------------------------------------
Gross Profit 1 (7)
Distribution costs (12) (11)
-----------------------------------------------------
Group operating profit (11) (1Cool

(Edited by PZG at 1:46 am on July 6, 2001)

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