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WW Update3,622 posts since 6 Feb 2007
I believe all countries with license fees have a per-household rule. These days, devices capable of receiving broadcast signals are everywhere, so collecting license fees on a per-set basis wouldn't make much sense.
deejay2,538 posts since 5 Jan 2003
Central (South) Oxford
It's per household, though lodgers who rent a room and are not related to the rest of the family are supposed to get their own license. It used to be the case that members of the household could also watch a portable tv set elsewhere, so long as it was internally powered by batteries (this was aimed at caravaners and those handheld b/w sets you could get in the 80s I think - though our caravan tv set was powered by the car battery via a long cable!)
Two minutes regions...
Steve in Pudsey8,042 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I suspect I may have asked this before but do genuine black and white TVs have external input support? Or is there a genuine demand to modify them to add a SCART/HDMI socket to archive sets for Freeview purposes?

I'm not sure there's even such a thing as a genuine black and white TV any more (there were black and white sets available after colour 625 came about).

The rule always used to be that the receiver had to be black and white and that ruled out videos as they had 'colour' tuners. That is the case with all TV reception equipment today


Yes, I don't know why they're watching or how they're receiving the signal, but my understanding is also that if you have a colour receiver with a b/w set, you still need a colour license. I don't think anyone makes a b/w Freeview set... unless you know different!!

I think that was relaxed around the time of DSO.
Write that down in your copybook now.
TVMan219 posts since 22 Dec 2014
Forgive my ignorance, but, given their age, how is it possible to receive Freeview, or DSat for that matter, on a black and white television set?

You can use a collection of converters and adapters, as demonstrated here:
AlexS178 posts since 19 Oct 2016
Central (East) Midlands Today
It's per household, though lodgers who rent a room and are not related to the rest of the family are supposed to get their own license. It used to be the case that members of the household could also watch a portable tv set elsewhere, so long as it was internally powered by batteries (this was aimed at caravaners and those handheld b/w sets you could get in the 80s I think - though our caravan tv set was powered by the car battery via a long cable!)

The can watch using a device not connected to the mains is still a thing and is now widely used by students at uni (whose parents TV licence covers them watching on their phones/laptops as long as they are not plugged in).