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Spencer For Hire5,727 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
What's with those subtitles/captions? They look weird... They're only on for part of the recording.


Presumably there for deaf people or the hard of hearing as a roundup at the end. This was in the days before news bulletins had Ceefax subtitles. IIRC these tended to be on BBC2 news bulletins predominantly. There was also the weekly News View programme providing the week's news with in-vision subtitles.
Robust amateurism
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Markymark6,276 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
What's with those subtitles/captions? They look weird... They're only on for part of the recording.


They look like they are derived from the BBC's 1970s 'home brew' caption genny, called ANCHOR

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/archive/pdffiles/engineering/bbc_engineering_84.pdf

Nationwide used it until the late 70s, as did pres until about the mid-late 80s (at the end of that clip you can see a caption composed with it)
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Steve Williams2,602 posts since 1 Aug 2008
Presumably there for deaf people or the hard of hearing as a roundup at the end. This was in the days before news bulletins had Ceefax subtitles. IIRC these tended to be on BBC2 news bulletins predominantly. There was also the weekly News View programme providing the week's news with in-vision subtitles.


Yes, the teatime bulletin on BBC2, for it was that, ended with the news with subtitles. They also did it at the end of News After Noon while the rest of the UK had the regional news. Obviously, deaf people only lived in London.
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gottago2,741 posts since 26 Aug 2004
London London
Wasn't there also a strike in the early 1980s, when BBC1 was off air all day? I'm sure as a kid I saw a yellow on blue caption with music being played, and it was on all day.


That was Thursday 5th April 1984 - BBC1 closed down all day, because there were so many live shows scheduled that it was considered a waste of time even trying.

BBC2 stayed on air, as most of their schedule was pre-recorded, and that included two news bulletins. Here's one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3A_625JHwo

I remember reading somewhere that the only thing on television during the 1978 strike was a sound-only simulcast of the radio news at 10pm.

Bloody hell, was anyone not on strike that day?! At least four different industries there!
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MMcG198625 posts since 14 Dec 2014
UTV Newsline
What's with those subtitles/captions? They look weird... They're only on for part of the recording.


They look like they are derived from the BBC's 1970s 'home brew' caption genny, called ANCHOR

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/archive/pdffiles/engineering/bbc_engineering_84.pdf

Nationwide used it until the late 70s, as did pres until about the mid-late 80s (at the end of that clip you can see a caption composed with it)


BBC Pres must've been operating with reduced staffing also. The text on those menus used to be mounted on a board, with a camera stuck in front - and the image was keyed over a slide.

Raises the question - were certain roles in BBC Pres banned from union membership? Virtually every strike I recall, the network continuity announcers were always there.
Markymark6,276 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
What's with those subtitles/captions? They look weird... They're only on for part of the recording.


They look like they are derived from the BBC's 1970s 'home brew' caption genny, called ANCHOR

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/archive/pdffiles/engineering/bbc_engineering_84.pdf

Nationwide used it until the late 70s, as did pres until about the mid-late 80s (at the end of that clip you can see a caption composed with it)


BBC Pres must've been operating with reduced staffing also. The text on those menus used to be mounted on a board, with a camera stuck in front - and the image was keyed over a slide.


Those 'Anchor' captions were always used for short notice stuff, like on-the-fly schedule changes and breakdowns etc


Raises the question - were certain roles in BBC Pres banned from union membership? Virtually every strike I recall, the network continuity announcers were always there.


The announcers were probably Equity members (if union members at all ?)

In the absence of any VT, TK, or live sources, I'm sure d'management were tech savvy enough to operate the desks and put out the 'service' ?
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commseng163 posts since 8 Dec 2016
London London
Raises the question - were certain roles in BBC Pres banned from union membership? Virtually every strike I recall, the network continuity announcers were always there.

Not that I am aware of, there was neither a closed shop, nor any area where you couldn't be a union member.
There were management branches within the union for example.
They weren't the best organised ones......!
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MMcG198625 posts since 14 Dec 2014
UTV Newsline
Wasn't there also a strike in the early 1980s, when BBC1 was off air all day? I'm sure as a kid I saw a yellow on blue caption with music being played, and it was on all day.


I can't recall a strike in the early 80s that blacked out BBC One for the entire day. I do recall the one in 1984 though that did just that - the caption shown that day is shown on this page:

https://thetvroom.com/ark/features/spotlight-industrial-disputes.html

The caption was accompanied by back-to-back Ceefax-in-vision music, all day. Although there were live programmes planned that day, I remember thinking at the time that it was a tad incredible that they couldn't manage some sort of limited service. I can't recall if Ceefax was affected that day - if not, it would've been better to put out 'Pages from Ceefax' than leaving up that caption.

Very different times. They didn't have a huge stockpile of 'Homes under the Hammer' and 'Bargain Hunt' to fall back on! Wink
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