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BBC Cymru Wales New HQ

Move-in delayed until Summer

RK
Rkolsen World News
If they are doing tech rehearsals at the moment, would that not signal them broadcasting from the new studio in early September?


Usually in a new build they may do several weeks or even months of rehearsals (with or without talent) to work out the kinks. In the US some news sets sit idle for months while they’re rehearsing or they wait until something like sweeps or a major event such as the Super Bowl or the Oscars.
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TH
Thistle
If they are doing tech rehearsals at the moment, would that not signal them broadcasting from the new studio in early September?


Usually in a new build they may do several weeks or even months of rehearsals (with or without talent) to work out the kinks. In the US some news sets sit idle for months while they’re rehearsing or they wait until something like sweeps or a major event such as the Super Bowl or the Oscars.


Just for comparsion - BBC Scotland's 'THE NINE' piloted from November 2018 before launching in February 2019.
BB
BBI45 Central (East) East Midlands Today
If they are doing tech rehearsals at the moment, would that not signal them broadcasting from the new studio in early September?


Usually in a new build they may do several weeks or even months of rehearsals (with or without talent) to work out the kinks. In the US some news sets sit idle for months while they’re rehearsing or they wait until something like sweeps or a major event such as the Super Bowl or the Oscars.


Just for comparsion - BBC Scotland's 'THE NINE' piloted from November 2018 before launching in February 2019.

I don't disagree with the point being made, but it's also worth considering that 'The Nine' was a new show, in a (somewhat) new studio, on a new channel. With Wales Today, the only new thing is the studio. Obviously they will want to do lots of testing to ensure that everything is right. However, it's not a new programme being developed from scratch, and the format and graphics will likely be remaining the same (although I do wonder if we'll see any changes to S4C Newyddion).
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BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
Newyddion may end up using it much more creatively.
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IS
Inspector Sands
BBI45 posted:

Usually in a new build they may do several weeks or even months of rehearsals (with or without talent) to work out the kinks. In the US some news sets sit idle for months while they’re rehearsing or they wait until something like sweeps or a major event such as the Super Bowl or the Oscars.


Just for comparsion - BBC Scotland's 'THE NINE' piloted from November 2018 before launching in February 2019.

I don't disagree with the point being made, but it's also worth considering that 'The Nine' was a new show, in a (somewhat) new studio, on a new channel. With Wales Today, the only new thing is the studio. Obviously they will want to do lots of testing to ensure that everything is right. However, it's not a new programme being developed from scratch, and the format and graphics will likely be remaining the same (although I do wonder if we'll see any changes to S4C Newyddion).

Yes, piloting takes several different forms depending on the circumstances.

Firstly there's actually getting a new studio and gallery to work. Places I've worked we've done a programme with a basic running order until something breaks, then you stop, fix it and then carry on until there's something you can't - a showstopper. Then you leave it to the system integrators to fix and have a cuppa. 'The Nine' will have skipped this bit, BBC Wales probably will have done more of this than anywhere else. Doesn't matter it looks like or who's sitting in the presenter chair, it's purely technical

Then there's piloting the programme - you know the studio works, what will the programme look and be like? This is when camera angles are discovered and standardised, decisions on where guests sit and stand up positions will be, how the presenters will work together, how the headline sequence will work etc. Basically deciding every element of the bulletin. BBC Wales wouldn't have done as much of this as BBC Scotland as the programmes are established

This gradually morphs into full piloting - with proper news and the actual presenters and reporters, doing bulletins as if they were on air. One launch I worked on was a building move like Cardiff - we'd do the 6:30 bulletin from the old place and then we'd do it all again in the new place at 7. The live reporters and crews stayed where they were for an extra half hour and did their lives again to a different presenter and gallery

Theres a lot more than just the studio to test of course, editing capacity and workflow fir example. In the above example it was a switch between linear and non linear editing so cut items were made at both sites and sent between them, gradually ramping up how many were made at the new building
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 25 August 2020 7:03am - 3 times in total
GE
thegeek Founding member London London
Sometimes a pilot of a new programme can go on at the same time as the old one is in use - Final Score did one with proper presenters and pundits in Salford at the same time as the final Final Score from TC5:
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Avatar credit: SMPTE RP198
CR
Critique Anglia (East) Look East
When Breakfast launched in Salford some of the photos they shared of the gallery showed Bill and Susanna in Salford (presumably doing pilots) whilst Charlie and Louise did the programme live from London. In the below it even looks like they’re discussing the same story (top half of the image is unrelated!):

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NG
noggin Founding member
BBI45 posted:


I don't disagree with the point being made, but it's also worth considering that 'The Nine' was a new show, in a (somewhat) new studio, on a new channel. With Wales Today, the only new thing is the studio. Obviously they will want to do lots of testing to ensure that everything is right. However, it's not a new programme being developed from scratch, and the format and graphics will likely be remaining the same (although I do wonder if we'll see any changes to S4C Newyddion).


That's not 100% correct. Whilst the Wales Today format may be largely the same, the production is moving from standard definition SDI infrastructure to HD SMPTE 2100 IP infrastructure. That change alone will need a lot of tyre-kicking from the technical team before it's ready for daily use with everyone familiar with the major technology differences. There are major training requirements coupled with moving to IP infrastructure (Concepts we've had since the 1930s are being replaced...)

I think Wales Today are already using Mosart in Cardiff, but their is every likelihood that the screen technology (and production techniques required for it) will be different too.

This is not quite as complex as launching a brand new show in a brand new studio, but it's a lot more complex than putting a new set into an existing studio and production workflow.
BR
Brekkie Wales Wales Today
Sometimes a pilot of a new programme can go on at the same time as the old one is in use - Final Score did one with proper presenters and pundits in Salford at the same time as the final Final Score from TC5:
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I don't remember that look at all for the Final Score graphics - thought they went from red to black/yellow.
Turns out nobody had 2020 vision.
AM
AlfieMulcahy Meridian (South East) South East Today
Just looked on the Foster + Partners page and when empty the top of the atrium looks like a curvier Gray's Inn Road
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CM
cmthwtv West Country (East) Points West


BA
Ballyboy UTV Newsline
Stunning!, wonder what the backdrop will be like. I miss the Cardiff bay backdrop
Last edited by Ballyboy on 27 August 2020 1:24pm

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