« Topics
1234...8910
Charlie Wells3,774 posts since 26 Nov 2003 Moderator
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
I wonder if the media release yesterday might in part be preparing the public and government for increased revenue requests, and stating what might happen if they're unsuccessful.

[[SNIP]]

Also according to the website as of 31st March 2017 there were 4.39 million over 75 licences in force. The BBC's subsidy from the government is £468 million for this year 2018/19, approximately half the following year, and £0 from 2020/21 onwards. Realistically I can see changes being made to either be a reduced rate instead of completely free (e.g. £50.50), and/or increasing the age at which people qualify (e.g. 80).

Neither option would be particularly popular, but the BBC has now made it clear what might happen if they don't get increased funding from somewhere.

Low and behold just over a month later...
Quote:
BBC launches consultation on TV licence fee for over-75s
The BBC is launching a consultation period to decide how licence fees for over-75s should be paid for.

Full BBC News article: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-46274054
Press release: https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2018/tv-licence-consultation
"Listen, we've all got something to bring to this conversation, but from now on what I think you should bring is silence." - Rimmer
623058
Lets make it means tested and since the UK government areadly know which oaps area poor it would require no extra work.
1
Closedown gave kudos
Brekkie31,391 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
I know it would only save a pittance but they've got to scrap the nonsense that is a black and white TV licence.

Unsurprisingly screwed over by the government I do think the over 75 licence fee is vulnerable, and they need to make sure the blame is at the governments door for that - the BBC should never have been put in a position where it's board is effectively making welfare decisions. I don't think they'll scrap it completely - either means test it, raise the age or change the criteria so if under 75s are in the household they don't qualify.
I preferred the internet when it had a sense of humour.
Stuart7,224 posts since 13 Oct 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
Lets make it means tested and since the UK government areadly know which oaps area poor it would require no extra work.

I think they would be straying into dangerous territory by 'means testing' something that was regarded as an entitlement for people of a certain age.


A reduced rate would be a better solution, or even just the Treasury continuing the current subsidy. £469m is a 'drop in the ocean' for a government with £800billion a year of public expenditure.
DVB Cornwall8,230 posts since 4 Dec 2003
Westcountry Spotlight
I'm actually stunned that when this was transferred across to the BBC from HMTreasury that the Corporation was given the authority to change the conditions associated with the over 75s concession. Seems crazy to me that this avenue was ever available despite it's effect on the BBC's finances.
4
Jeffmister, Brekkie and 2 others
  • Stuart
  • 623058
gave kudos
623058
Lets make it means tested and since the UK government areadly know which oaps area poor it would require no extra work.

I think they would be straying into dangerous territory by 'means testing' something that was regarded as an entitlement for people of a certain age.


A reduced rate would be a better solution, or even just the Treasury continuing the current subsidy. £469m is a 'drop in the ocean' for a government with £800billion a year of public expenditure.


Maybe the BBC Should bring back these adverts:

Spencer For Hire5,831 posts since 13 Jan 2003
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Lets make it means tested and since the UK government areadly know which oaps area poor it would require no extra work.


Do they, though? I thought most benefits for the elderly weren’t means tested, hence why my parents both get free bus passes when they’ve got a perfectly good BMW which they can go to the Post Office in to collect their winter fuel allowance.

The problem with means testing is it often costs more in administration than the money it saves.
Robust amateurism
noggin14,313 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Yes - the BBC is between a rock and a hard place with this. The government took a political decision to pay for over 75's licence fees - and then (a different government?) took another political decision to shift the financial responsibility for this from the treasury to the BBC (alongside funding the World Service, S4C, rural broadband and Local TV)...

Means testing sounds like the best solution - but as others have said - it's very difficult to administer cost effectively. This is a really tricky situation.
2
Jeffmister and Technologist gave kudos