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BBC breakfast Break In Transmission.

(May 2007)

JR
jrothwell97 Meridian (South East) South Today
tvmercia posted:
possibly the worst recreation ever


It was actually pretty accurate, and who cares? It was just something to give us a rough idea of what it looked like. At least it wasn't something like this:

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ST
Stuart West Country (West) Spotlight
jrothwell97 posted:
tvmercia posted:
possibly the worst recreation ever


It was actually pretty accurate, and who cares? It was just something to give us a rough idea of what it looked like. At least it wasn't something like this:

PLANK! Laughing Laughing Laughing
JV
James Vertigan Founding member London London
davidlees posted:


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I didn't know 623058 worked for the Red Bee subtitling department... Laughing
LO
LONDON Meridian (South) South Today
davidlees posted:
I have often wondered if the person doing the subtitles works from home or is somewhere at the BBC/Red Bee. Working from home would probably be possible as long at they were watching on terrestrial.


Subtitles can be done in either way, i know alot of broadcasters are actually opting for freelance subtilers rather than contracted companies, as they used to, this means that the cost of subtitleing is cheaper, and is now done by fewer people.
GE
thegeek Founding member London London
Red Bee have subtitlers all over the place - for example, I know that Midlands Today in Breakfast this morning was subtitled by someone at Queen Margaret Drive in Glasgow. Overnight subtitling on News 24 is sometimes done by the Australian Caption Centre, which is now owned by Red Bee.

Also, a lot of live subtitling is now carried out by 'respeaking' - someone listens to what's being said, then talks into some text-to-speech software, also reading out punctuation, etc. It's not quite as accurate as stenography, but far easier and cheaper to train people for.
IS
Inspector Sands
thegeek posted:
Red Bee have subtitlers all over the place - for example, I know that Midlands Today in Breakfast this morning was subtitled by someone at Queen Margaret Drive in Glasgow. Overnight subtitling on News 24 is sometimes done by the Australian Caption Centre, which is now owned by Red Bee.

Also, a lot of live subtitling is now carried out by 'respeaking' - someone listens to what's being said, then talks into some text-to-speech software, also reading out punctuation, etc. It's not quite as accurate as stenography, but far easier and cheaper to train people for.


There are subtitlers who work from home. There was an article in the BBC staff magazine a few years ago about a woman who live subtitled News 24 from her house which overlooked the Firth of Forth! She did half an hour at a time and someone else in another part of teh country did the alternate half hours
JJ
Juicy Joe Founding member Central (West) Midlands Today
James Vertigan posted:
davidlees posted:


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I didn't know 623058 worked for the Red Bee subtitling department... Laughing


Ha ha ha!!! Sheer genius! Very Happy
TK
TerryK125
davidlees posted:
The sound was lost after the 7:30 regional opt-out. I'm always suspicious when things like that happen - technical problem or someone forgetting to turn the sound back up?


I wondered if it was something to do with the opt - but the sound also went for 30 seconds or so during the sport 15 minutes later prompting another brief airing of the breakdown caption.
JV
James Vertigan Founding member London London
I'm beginning to wonder how they got words like "haeufbg" and "appoll kwraoeus" on the subtitles, because I thought that all words on the subtitling system had 3-letter codes...

That's what I read on the Newsroom South East website a while back anyway... the subtitler was subtitling a cookery item and typed LEM, but instead of "there is a lemon in the tart" it came out as "there is a Liberal Democrat in the tart"!
SP
Steve in Pudsey Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I suspect the 3 letter codes were macros for regularly used phrases
IS
Inspector Sands
James Vertigan posted:
I'm beginning to wonder how they got words like "haeufbg" and "appoll kwraoeus" on the subtitles, because I thought that all words on the subtitling system had 3-letter codes...

That's what I read on the Newsroom South East website a while back anyway... the subtitler was subtitling a cookery item and typed LEM, but instead of "there is a lemon in the tart" it came out as "there is a Liberal Democrat in the tart"!


They program the machines with phrases or unusual words (such as names) that they are expecting to occur. Don't know if these are 3 letters though, until 're-speaking' came along live subtitling was done by stenography
LO
looknorth
it happend twice the other beging about 4 minutes later but only a small section of the music was herd the second time and both times suzzanah was doiung an interview then bill apologised to bbc1 viewers only Rolling Eyes

why did they need to take the picture away though

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