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Riaz398 posts since 6 Jan 2016
I have long assumed that crime news is popular with the public. Have tastes been changing in recent years that have resulted in declining interest in Crimewatch?
Neil Jones3,931 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I have long assumed that crime news is popular with the public. Have tastes been changing in recent years that have resulted in declining interest in Crimewatch?


Crime news is probably only "popular" in the regard that some crimes are so shocking and are reported on in such depth that they leave a lasting impression and their details can be recalled many years later - Moors Murders for example.

Other crime news such as "98 year old widow has window broken and jewellery stolen"? Probably not so much and most definitely not recallable many years later. The odd local story gets prominence - "war veteran has medals stolen" for example occasionally comes up.

The likes of Crimewatch is probably seen by the police as a sort of last resort sort of thing and then only for really serious crime that most other traditional investigation avenues have failed. Even then it doesn't always guarantee any results. But it is probably about as PSB as it gets.
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Riaz398 posts since 6 Jan 2016
Crime news and celebrity gossip are the staples that sell newspapers. Foreign news generally only appeals to people who have connections with the foreign country in question or are Guardian reading BBC2 watching Radio 4 listening intellectual types, with the possible exception of war.

Local TV news around the world is commonly bulked out with crime news either because it attracts viewers or to fill space because not a lot of interesting things have happened locally. Yes, "98 year old widow has window broken and jewellery stolen" appears on screen for a couple of minutes one evening and is almost forgotten about in a couple of weeks time. Sometimes crime news does help to solve crimes but otherwise it's just sensationalism and empathy for the victims.

The likes of Crimewatch is probably seen by the police as a sort of last resort sort of thing and then only for really serious crime that most other traditional investigation avenues have failed. Even then it doesn't always guarantee any results. But it is probably about as PSB as it gets.


Have you got any information about the relationship between the producers of Crimewatch and police forces? If so, then has the relationship between the two started to break down in places or have the police have lost interest in and enthusiasm for Crimewatch?

Something to take into account is the semi-permanent nature of internet news sources compared with the ephemeral nature of the traditional print and broadcast media. The page on a news website about a "98 year old widow has window broken and jewellery stolen" from a couple of weeks ago is still around for all to see whilst TV news reports have vanished into the ether and almost all newspapers have been thrown in the bin.
Steve Williams2,102 posts since 1 Aug 2008
News at 10 on BBC One is such an odd relic, like CBBC on BBC One. It's from a time when we only had 2 channels.

I imagine not having it in the schedule would give the channel much more flexibility in what it could show and when.


Would imagine the controller of BBC1 is less excited about any potential "flexibility" than they are concerned about how they're going to fill the ninety minutes every day where the national news bulletins used to be.
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Riaz398 posts since 6 Jan 2016
This isn’t a new idea, back when digital switchover was on the horizon there was talk on here that in the future there wouldn’t be need for certain genres of programming to be on the main channels anymore.

One of these has come true, children’s programming from CBBC and CITV has moved full time to their own standalone channels.


There are two conflicting schools of thought. The first is that 'main' TV channels have to be multi-genre / all in one / highly diverse / something for everyone, and the second is that TV channels should specialise in things like children's programmes, popular entertainment, factual programmes, news, sports, etc. Something I thought about was whether the analogue switch off could be an opportunity for the revival of regional ITV on ITV1 as Corrie and the shiny floor popular entertainment could be exiled to other (national) ITV channels. Something that would not have been socially acceptable whilst there were still people with only analogue TVs.

The question that hangs over the BBC is whether they have the courage to invoke a major reorganisation of where their programmes are ultimately broadcast in the future or whether they have frozen themselves in time due to a lack of imagination of their senior figures.

Exactly. Still arguably massive holes in the schedules where childrens and schools shows used to be.


The best way to answer the question of what these (and other) holes in the schedules should be filled with is to ask oneself what should the function and purpose of BBC1 be, and why, in a multi channel world.
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lobster1,427 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Anglia (East) Look East
Quote:
Exactly. Still arguably massive holes in the schedules where childrens and schools shows used to be.


The best way to answer the question of what these (and other) holes in the schedules should be filled with is to ask oneself what should the function and purpose of BBC1 be, and why, in a multi channel world.


i agree, and the bbc itself has been struggling with this for at least a decade -

when you think about it, just what is the point of bbc 2 these days? it is nearly indistinguishable from bbc 1.

back in the 1990s, there was something distinctive about it, there were programmes (like bottom, young ones, not the nine o clock news, red dwarf etc) that you just would not see on bbc one. today, bbc 2 is more of a testing ground for bbc one programmes.

i think bbc 4 is the only channel which is truly distinctive from any commercial offering.

the bbc has too many linear channels is the problem - there is plenty of content to go around if the news was removed.

bbc 1 and 2 could be amalgamated, what's left and what goes on bbc 4 could be the true alternative channel.
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London Lite8,143 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
BBC Two seems to be a testing ground these days for commissions which eventually end up on BBC One. (The Apprentice, Line of Duty)

BBC Four has taken the majority of 'worthy' programming, which has diluted the output.

BBC One I think still has a clear remit of providing populist entertainment, event programming and PSB. Whether this type of format will survive once the baby boomers have all passed away, leaving younger viewers who are used to VOD remains to be seen, but I think there will always be a demand for a linear tv channel which has event and populist programming which viewers can interact with as it happens.
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Riaz398 posts since 6 Jan 2016
i agree, and the bbc itself has been struggling with this for at least a decade -

when you think about it, just what is the point of bbc 2 these days? it is nearly indistinguishable from bbc 1.


Back in the years of analogue terrestrial there were restrictions with what could be done with BBC1 and BBC2. They had an elevated position above the digital channels because they could be received on an analogue TV. So, yes, they had to show news, Eastenders, children's programmes, prominent national events, and Crimewatch.

Now that analogue has been switched off BBC1 and BBC2, along with ITV1, no longer have an elevated position above other digital channels. Therefore broadcasting certain programmes on them could be considered to be an act of tradition, convention, or sentimentality over anything else.

Quote:
the bbc has too many linear channels is the problem


This is debatable. What I think is more concerning is that the BBC isn't using their channels to their full potential because of a mindset shaped during the analogue era. Some programmes might be better off moved from linear TV to the internet.
Riaz398 posts since 6 Jan 2016
BBC One I think still has a clear remit of providing populist entertainment, event programming and PSB. Whether this type of format will survive once the baby boomers have all passed away, leaving younger viewers who are used to VOD remains to be seen, but I think there will always be a demand for a linear tv channel which has event and populist programming which viewers can interact with as it happens.


If you go back to my two schools of thought then one could argue that this format was all fine and well back in the days when terrestrial analogue ruled but with today's technology it's becoming an anachronism. If certain PSB and factual programmes are axed, glitzed up so they are almost indistinguishable from popular entertainment, or exiled to the internet then BBC1 will be in danger of becoming the TV equivalent of Radio 1 with the news and coverage of prominent events thrown in.

It's shades of grey here but it could be an issue if older viewers prefer everything on one channel separated by time and younger viewers prefer everything on different channels at the same time.

BBC1 is undeniably a strong national brand as of 2017 but could weaken in years to come due to changes in technology and demographics. To the older generation it is Aunty Beeb but to the younger generation it is just one of many TV channels.
Didely Squit!187 posts since 15 Mar 2004
Meridian (North) Oxford

I can't see ITV picking up the format, or creating something similar, unless they could get away with charging people to call a premium rate phone line with information, and that wouldn't be in the spirit of providing a public service.


They did try a similar thing back in the 90s, a one off show, with a very bored looking Penny Smith as the presenter. LWT I think, and it was 9pm on a Friday ?


That was Britain’s Most Wanted, you are right it was fronted by Penny Smith and Dermot Murngahan at LWT, had a great theme tune as I recall.


Yes! You're right! Unfortuantely the only recording I ever had of Britain's Most Wanted was from a VHS tape therefore terrible quality...today only the theme tune audio has survived. A great tune that I've tried to track down a proper copy of for years never to be successful Sad Sad

Composed by Boom! music I think...

If anyone knows of it's whereabouts I'd love the complete set (wrong forum I know!)

This is what I have: