« Topics
1234...9101112...161718
james-20013,714 posts since 13 Sep 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
You're saying "whoosh" like we missed an obvious joke... but you edited your post to change it.

Yeah I don't get it either.


The really strange thing is his original post said "plasma ball", then when it was pointed out he changed it to Van De Graaff generator, then after making his "whoosh" post he changed it back to plasma ball again. He got it wrong, edited it to make it right, then somehow decided to act as if saying "plasma ball" was a "joke", even though the "joke" makes no sense?
Interceptor727 posts since 20 Oct 2014
Did S4C work from a dirty feed the rest of the time?

I certainly remember seeing glimpses of presentation elsewhere. My total exposure to S4C Analogue amounts to however many weeks I was there as a child - mostly during the Summer though (when there wouldn't have been any Schools programming).

S4C in Wales opted-out for the junctions but opted back in for the programmes with Channel 4. Is there any reason why S4C couldn't play it all from their end?

It would involve having the entire library duplicated over. I never understood why S4C didn't have a clean feed to work with though, pretty much every simulcast junction would have a peek of Channel 4 presentation either side (and I think that carried on right until the end!).


I think that was because each programme had an announcement before it about support materials, which were recorded by Central (and later Channel 4) and played out by Channel 4. So, S4C would have needed copies of those as well as the programmes if they were playing everything out themselves. As it was, it suited them to take a dirty feed of Channel 4 so all programmes and announcements would be on their feed.

Makes sense for schools in that case, doesn't explain why they used it for other live simulcasts though.
Inspector Sands12,749 posts since 25 Aug 2004
I started primary school,in the late 1970s. We had one TV, which was a black and white thing on a wheeled stand with extraordinary wooden doors covering the screen, which when opened also unfolded a canopy, presumably to try and reduce any reflections on the screen. It would take a good 10 minutes to warm up (before the picture would appear), so would be wheeled in with much aplomb by the teacher and we’d sit listening to the end of the previous programme, and the interval music before the one we were supposed to be watching. By the time the picture came on, the clock would usually be counting down and the teachers would insist on silence so we could “enjoy” Music Time, Watch or How We Used to Live or whatever.

We had those big Panasonic sets with the 6 preset buttons (normally labelled BBC1,2,3 and ITV1,2 and *) but I don't remember them ever holding their tuning from one lesson to the next. So every time the telly was wheeled in and the aerial lead plugged in there was then endless faffing to try and get it tuned in to ITV or BBC1 by the middle aged and not very technically proficient teacher. And that was nothing compared with the faffing that took place when we were meant to watch a video.


Of course it was normally me who helped the teacher twiddle the thumbwheels, Odd that a decade or so later I was on the other side putting the programmes on air. I wonder if the primary school kids of today have the same experience with their interactive whiteboards?
1
Si-Co gave kudos
Xilla194 posts since 29 Nov 2003
My primary school years were 1993 to 2000, yet one of the most iconic bit of schools presentation for me is the Daytime on 2 ident that was withdrawn several years before I was born, as lots of VHS copies of the likes of Look & Read and Zig Zag were recorded in that era. Despite only being about a decade old at the time the whole look of that era fascinated me, and I'd always be disappointed when the teacher fast-forwarded the 'Follows Shortly' slides.

.


At least 1 teacher in my primary school hated the class singing along to Just a Minute and would turn the volume down until the programme started!

I started primary school,in the late 1970s. We had one TV, which was a black and white thing on a wheeled stand with extraordinary wooden doors covering the screen, which when opened also unfolded a canopy, presumably to try and reduce any reflections on the screen. It would take a good 10 minutes to warm up (before the picture would appear), so would be wheeled in with much aplomb by the teacher and we’d sit listening to the end of the previous programme, and the interval music before the one we were supposed to be watching. By the time the picture came on, the clock would usually be counting down and the teachers would insist on silence so we could “enjoy” Music Time, Watch or How We Used to Live or whatever.

We had those big Panasonic sets with the 6 preset buttons (normally labelled BBC1,2,3 and ITV1,2 and *) but I don't remember them ever holding their tuning from one lesson to the next. So every time the telly was wheeled in and the aerial lead plugged in there was then endless faffing to try and get it tuned in to ITV or BBC1 by the middle aged and not very technically proficient teacher. And that was nothing compared with the faffing that took place when we were meant to watch a video.


Of course it was normally me who helped the teacher twiddle the thumbwheels, Odd that a decade or so later I was on the other side putting the programmes on air. I wonder if the primary school kids of today have the same experience with their interactive whiteboards?


My teachers still had trouble with the clunky buttons well into the 90s. Always seemed to press every single button apart from the right one. In fact one time a teacher thought a programme was airing on Channel 4 when it was actually BBC2. Cue a class of 10 year olds tittering away at the 10 seconds or so we saw of Living and Growing!
Last edited by Xilla on 22 May 2018 3:49am
Si-Co1,882 posts since 2 Oct 2003
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Did S4C work from a dirty feed the rest of the time?

I certainly remember seeing glimpses of presentation elsewhere. My total exposure to S4C Analogue amounts to however many weeks I was there as a child - mostly during the Summer though (when there wouldn't have been any Schools programming).

It would involve having the entire library duplicated over. I never understood why S4C didn't have a clean feed to work with though, pretty much every simulcast junction would have a peek of Channel 4 presentation either side (and I think that carried on right until the end!).


I think that was because each programme had an announcement before it about support materials, which were recorded by Central (and later Channel 4) and played out by Channel 4. So, S4C would have needed copies of those as well as the programmes if they were playing everything out themselves. As it was, it suited them to take a dirty feed of Channel 4 so all programmes and announcements would be on their feed.

Makes sense for schools in that case, doesn't explain why they used it for other live simulcasts though.


I assume S4C received the same feed of Channel 4 as the ITV regions did (everything bar ads). As to why, perhaps it wasn’t considered cost-effective to send out a separate clean feed purely for them to record a few shows down the line, and take a few live.

If they were following a common schedule 75% or so of the time, things may have been different. I assume programmes that were in the can early enough were sent to S4C on tape - or a line booked to feed these to them to record - and late productions recorded from the dirty feed. I remember topical programmes like The Friday Alternative were delivered to Channel 4 only an hour or so before broadcast, and on one occasion the programme got lost in transit and had to be shown the following afternoon instead.
THE NEXT POST FOLLOWS SHORTLY...
commseng147 posts since 8 Dec 2016
London London
I assume S4C received the same feed of Channel 4 as the ITV regions did (everything bar ads). As to why, perhaps it wasn’t considered cost-effective to send out a separate clean feed purely for them to record a few shows down the line, and take a few live.

If they were following a common schedule 75% or so of the time, things may have been different. I assume programmes that were in the can early enough were sent to S4C on tape - or a line booked to feed these to them to record - and late productions recorded from the dirty feed. I remember topical programmes like The Friday Alternative were delivered to Channel 4 only an hour or so before broadcast, and on one occasion the programme got lost in transit and had to be shown the following afternoon instead.

I'd imagine it was a financial consideration - a line from Bristol to Cardiff being considerably cheaper than a separate line from London to Cardiff. I don't imagine S4C has ever had much in the way of spare cash flowing about, and as we have said here before, vision circuits back in the 80/90s were very very expensive.
commseng147 posts since 8 Dec 2016
London London
Of course it was normally me who helped the teacher twiddle the thumbwheels, Odd that a decade or so later I was on the other side putting the programmes on air. I wonder if the primary school kids of today have the same experience with their interactive whiteboards?

I was the same at the junior school, operating the Philips N1500 video recorder, leaving class to go and start a radio recording, operating the overhead projector and tape player in assembly, and so forth. That would have been up to 1977, and 41 years later still working in an industry with kit descended from that!
Last edited by commseng on 22 May 2018 12:07pm
1
thegeek gave kudos
Markymark5,911 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
Did anybody regularly watch schools programmes outside of school or did you only watch them at school?


I only watched them at school, and at my primary school (1969 to 75), we only watched BBC school programmes.
Possibly because until 1972, the school only had a single 405 line telly, and only a Band I 'X' aerial
looking at Crystal P. Radio schools programmes were far more common, we had 'Music and Movement' on Radio 4 daily. The FM tuner was in the headmaster's office, and the audio from it was distributed to the six classrooms on a 100 volt line system.

At secondary school (75-80) there was an N1500 Philips VCR. We never watched any programmes live,
and I recall most programmes we did watch were not schools progs. BBC Horizon, and ATV's John Pilger
docs stick in my mind.

The N1500 was terrible, if you had sound and vision at the same time from it, it was mere co-incidence !
Andrew13,101 posts since 27 Mar 2001
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
At primary school, which was early 90s, we had one TV, one of those massive things on a trolley with the TV in a lockable wooden cupboard that was wheeled from classroom to classroom.

I can’t recall watching much live, although I suppose we might have done, but we did watch schools programmes that had been taped.

Like people have mentioned, they could never find the channel the vcr was programmed into, pressed every button bar the right one, we would see clips of Richard and Judy in the process, and we might end up seeing the ITV schools on Channel 4 presentation as once they’d pressed play, they darent attempt to do any fast forwarding or pausing.

I think switching on an overhead projector and slapping on a hand written slide on the glass was about as technical as they got in those days.

I also remember listening to schools programmes that were taped off the radio as well, imagine that.