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Markymark6,957 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

A lot of stuff would be pooled between the regions anyway because it was too big for one region to do. In one of the IBA Yearbooks they talk about the 1975 European Cup Final at Hampden Park which was an enormous event, so while STV provided the main coverage there were also OB trucks from ATV, LWT and Tyne Tees at the venue to provide additional resources.


Yep. 1977 IBA Yearbook, page 36-39

There's indeed a picture of STV, Tyne Tees, and ATV OB trucks parked up together at Hampden. Also a link was established to LWT and back, for slo-mo replays using LWT's hideously expensive Video Disk recorder.

The Pope's 1982 visit to the UK, was too big and spread out for either the BBC or ITV (as a network) to cope with alone, and coverage there was pooled between all available BBC and ITV OB trucks
1
dosxuk4,202 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
The contract for network football coverage changed in 1993, LWT had been in charge since they arrived but in 1993 it was won by Central, hence the rather abrupt change to network coverage in that year with the departure of the likes of Saint and Greavsie and the arrival of the hapless Matthew Lorenzo. But in these cases the individual ITV regions would have a role to play as well. In the case of something like The March, LWT would be responsible for the look of the coverage and hiring the presenters and so on, but there'd probably be a crew and director from the specific region. Indeed I have a Match Annual which had a behind the scenes feature and in one picture you can see technical equipment clearly labelled "THAMES OBs".


Here's an old The Match planning sheet (clicky for bigger):
* * * * * * *

On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.
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Steve Williams2,781 posts since 1 Aug 2008
On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.


Thank you for that - a good example of how it all worked together, with a Thames OB unit for LWT-produced coverage with Anglia involvement. Regions working together for the common good of the coverage to get a consistent approach.

It would appear the dispute must have occurred so late in the day, that they had to change the running order on WOS mid show. I just wonder if it could've been about whether or not it was a simple case of whether coverage should be directed by someone from TTTV or YTV?


Would have been even simpler than that, I'm sure - the directors were billed in the TV Times (actually I have the TV Times for that week at home, I'll get it out when I'm back there). I'm sure it would have been at more to do with the technical staff than any creative or editorial reason.
Inspector Sands13,761 posts since 25 Aug 2004

On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.

There's an episode of the behind the scenes series Kellyvision that featured an athletics meeting at Gateshead where they showed a similar setup - a Tyne Tees OB feeding into LWT who then set it back to Tyne Tees for broadcast
Night Thoughts228 posts since 24 Jan 2016
London London
The contract for network football coverage changed in 1993, LWT had been in charge since they arrived but in 1993 it was won by Central, hence the rather abrupt change to network coverage in that year with the departure of the likes of Saint and Greavsie and the arrival of the hapless Matthew Lorenzo. But in these cases the individual ITV regions would have a role to play as well. In the case of something like The March, LWT would be responsible for the look of the coverage and hiring the presenters and so on, but there'd probably be a crew and director from the specific region. Indeed I have a Match Annual which had a behind the scenes feature and in one picture you can see technical equipment clearly labelled "THAMES OBs".


Here's an old The Match planning sheet (clicky for bigger):
*

On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.


Blimey, thank you. What on earth was a "Wally seat"?
Hatton Cross3,263 posts since 4 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
It's the camera on the halfway line at ground level. Mostly used for a close up of the ball as it's kicked at the start of the first, second halves and very little else.

I'm guessing the name comes from the same camera position in another sport where there is a element of risk from being hit by the ball, where 'you have to be a wally to be on that camera'...
...possibly.
Although someone will now post that it dates from some obscure era in the black and white film days of Hollywood.
My user name might look like Hatton Cross, but it's pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove.
1
bluecortina850 posts since 26 Jul 2012
The contract for network football coverage changed in 1993, LWT had been in charge since they arrived but in 1993 it was won by Central, hence the rather abrupt change to network coverage in that year with the departure of the likes of Saint and Greavsie and the arrival of the hapless Matthew Lorenzo. But in these cases the individual ITV regions would have a role to play as well. In the case of something like The March, LWT would be responsible for the look of the coverage and hiring the presenters and so on, but there'd probably be a crew and director from the specific region. Indeed I have a Match Annual which had a behind the scenes feature and in one picture you can see technical equipment clearly labelled "THAMES OBs".


Here's an old The Match planning sheet (clicky for bigger):
*

On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.


Blimey, thank you. What on earth was a "Wally seat"?


I think you'll find that's the seat attached to the low camera dolly and swings in opposition to the camera. Think of a see-saw, but instead of the seats going up and down in opposition, they turn/twist in opposition to each other. The cameraman can put their feet up on it and use their body motion to turn the camera. Why "wally'? I don't know, perhaps it's named after the inventor, In the same way that 'Gardam's pit' was used to describe a hole dug in the pitch ground just outside the byline into which a camera could be placed on a normal tripod and be at low level - named after Bob Gardam who apparently came up with the idea. (He was a very well respected OB director).

Edit: Here's a link to a reference to Gardam's pit.

http://www.wsc.co.uk/wsc-daily/1174-february-2014/11252-bob-gardam-the-man-who-shaped-football-on-tv
2
Markymark6,957 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

I think you'll find that's the seat attached to the low camera dolly and swings in opposition to the camera. Think of a see-saw, but instead of the seats going up and down in opposition, they turn/twist in opposition to each other. The cameraman can put their feet up on it and use their body motion to turn the camera. Why "wally'? I don't know, perhaps it's named after the inventor, In the same way that 'Gardam's pit' was used to describe a hole dug in the pitch ground just outside the byline into which a camera could be placed on a normal tripod and be at low level - named after Bob Gardam who apparently came up with the idea. (He was a very well respected OB director).

Edit: Here's a link to a reference to Gardam's pit.

http://www.wsc.co.uk/wsc-daily/1174-february-2014/11252-bob-gardam-the-man-who-shaped-football-on-tv


Another name I've heard is 'Sheffield Plate' (I've no idea why !)

http://www.camseat.co.uk/360-p.aspx
bluecortina850 posts since 26 Jul 2012

I think you'll find that's the seat attached to the low camera dolly and swings in opposition to the camera. Think of a see-saw, but instead of the seats going up and down in opposition, they turn/twist in opposition to each other. The cameraman can put their feet up on it and use their body motion to turn the camera. Why "wally'? I don't know, perhaps it's named after the inventor, In the same way that 'Gardam's pit' was used to describe a hole dug in the pitch ground just outside the byline into which a camera could be placed on a normal tripod and be at low level - named after Bob Gardam who apparently came up with the idea. (He was a very well respected OB director).

Edit: Here's a link to a reference to Gardam's pit.

http://www.wsc.co.uk/wsc-daily/1174-february-2014/11252-bob-gardam-the-man-who-shaped-football-on-tv


Another name I've heard is 'Sheffield Plate' (I've no idea why !)

http://www.camseat.co.uk/360-p.aspx


Great link! Here's another to one in action:

http://www.efl.com/cms_images/tv-camera-mkvafcw-8x6549-2292664_478x359.jpg
Markymark6,957 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

On this occasion, it was Thames trucks used, along with Anglia's links van, feeding to LWT for transmission, despite coming from a site about a mile from Anglia House.

There's an episode of the behind the scenes series Kellyvision that featured an athletics meeting at Gateshead where they showed a similar setup - a Tyne Tees OB feeding into LWT who then set it back to Tyne Tees for broadcast


Also the camera in the pres studio, (shooting Jim Rosenthal) was supplied by Trillion, they were a Soho
based facilities company, I can't remember who swallowed them up ?