The Newsroom

International News Presentation: Past and Present

WW
WW Update
LCI, France; morning news, 2020:

WW
WW Update

And until the mid-1990s, ARD's late afternoon and early evening (pre-8pm) programming was regional -- consisting mostly of regional news magazines, cartoons, sitcoms, and other mostly family-friendly programming, all of which differed depending on the ARD broadcaster in question. Here, for instance, is a 1989 continuity announcement from Frankfurt-based HR, serving the Land of Hessen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZnx_zd9XZ4


Here's another clip, this time from 1980. The regional programming starts right after an afternoon edition of Tagesschau and, after an in-vision continuity announcement, the signal is then split again for two newsmagazine opt-outs, one for Baden-Wurttemberg and another for Rhineland-Palatinate (seen here):

RD
Roger Darthwell London London

And until the mid-1990s, ARD's late afternoon and early evening (pre-8pm) programming was regional -- consisting mostly of regional news magazines, cartoons, sitcoms, and other mostly family-friendly programming, all of which differed depending on the ARD broadcaster in question. Here, for instance, is a 1989 continuity announcement from Frankfurt-based HR, serving the Land of Hessen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZnx_zd9XZ4


Here's another clip, this time from 1980. The regional programming starts right after an afternoon edition of Tagesschau and, after an in-vision continuity announcement, the signal is then split again for two newsmagazine opt-outs, one for Baden-Wurttemberg and another for Rhineland-Palatinate (seen here):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVRAF4ZrpH4

Since this clip is from 1980..an obvious question has come to my mind....how did they manage back in 1980 to get the signal of ARD and ZDF to West Berlin, given that the city was deep into East Germany and that satellite TV did not even exist back then? My apologies for my boring questions
LL
London Lite Founding member London London

And until the mid-1990s, ARD's late afternoon and early evening (pre-8pm) programming was regional -- consisting mostly of regional news magazines, cartoons, sitcoms, and other mostly family-friendly programming, all of which differed depending on the ARD broadcaster in question. Here, for instance, is a 1989 continuity announcement from Frankfurt-based HR, serving the Land of Hessen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZnx_zd9XZ4


Here's another clip, this time from 1980. The regional programming starts right after an afternoon edition of Tagesschau and, after an in-vision continuity announcement, the signal is then split again for two newsmagazine opt-outs, one for Baden-Wurttemberg and another for Rhineland-Palatinate (seen here):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVRAF4ZrpH4

Since this clip is from 1980..an obvious question has come to my mind....how did they manage back in 1980 to get the signal of ARD and ZDF to West Berlin, given that the city was deep into East Germany and that satellite TV did not even exist back then? My apologies for my boring questions


To be fair, most of East Germany had access to West German channels from West German txs. I don't know the technical aspect of how it was distributed to Berlin, but those in East Berlin would have had access to them too.
MI
TheMike Central (East) East Midlands Today

And until the mid-1990s, ARD's late afternoon and early evening (pre-8pm) programming was regional -- consisting mostly of regional news magazines, cartoons, sitcoms, and other mostly family-friendly programming, all of which differed depending on the ARD broadcaster in question. Here, for instance, is a 1989 continuity announcement from Frankfurt-based HR, serving the Land of Hessen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZnx_zd9XZ4


Here's another clip, this time from 1980. The regional programming starts right after an afternoon edition of Tagesschau and, after an in-vision continuity announcement, the signal is then split again for two newsmagazine opt-outs, one for Baden-Wurttemberg and another for Rhineland-Palatinate (seen here):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVRAF4ZrpH4

Since this clip is from 1980..an obvious question has come to my mind....how did they manage back in 1980 to get the signal of ARD and ZDF to West Berlin, given that the city was deep into East Germany and that satellite TV did not even exist back then? My apologies for my boring questions

Richtfunkstrecke - a radio relay from a now demolished 332 metre high mast in Wendland, Lower Saxony. So high, because of the curvature of the earth in the 133km between the transmitter and receiving site in West Berlin.

Other masts were constructed on the West German part of the Harz mountains to connect West Berlin with the outside world, including telephone calls.
Roger Darthwell and WW Update gave kudos
WW
WW Update
Telemundo, U.S., 2020:

NYTV and Roger Darthwell gave kudos
RD
Roger Darthwell London London
rdd posted:
Do ARD and ZDF show other programmes in the weeks they don't have the breakfast show?


My recollection is that they both go out on both channels - ie ARD Morgenmagazin is aired on both ARD and ZDF during the first week, and then ZDF Morgenmagazin is aired on both ARD and ZDF during the second week.



Yes, outside of special events both the Morgen- and Mittagsmagazin go out on both channels, regardless if it's the ARD or ZDF edition.

During special events you even sometimes get the wierd situation that the program made by ARD/ZDF isn't even shown on the respective channel. When for example the Olympics or the World Cup, where ARD and ZDF are sharing the rights, are happening outside Europe it can happen that the ZDF-Mittagsmagazin isn't shown on ZDF and only on Das Erste, because ZDF is showing the sports.

Something that you describe here is happening right now as I write....on Das Erste there is Sportschau, so because of that the ARD-Mittagsmagazin is only being broadcasted on ZDF!
MI
mici0123 World News

As far as I know there are no longer any regional programmes on Das Erste isn't it?


That's right. Regional programming on ARD's Das Erste was abolished in the mid-1990s and the channel now has a single national lineup. Nowadays, regional programming is only seen on ARD's "third" channels.


AFIAK There still was Regional Advertising till 2005 on cable and terrestrial, when they switched to the central playout (as @TheMike noted). Satellite got ads from WDR, wich were increasingly nationalised.


Here's another clip, this time from 1980. The regional programming starts right after an afternoon edition of Tagesschau and, after an in-vision continuity announcement, the signal is then split again for two newsmagazine opt-outs, one for Baden-Wurttemberg and another for Rhineland-Palatinate (seen here):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVRAF4ZrpH4

Since this clip is from 1980..an obvious question has come to my mind....how did they manage back in 1980 to get the signal of ARD and ZDF to West Berlin, given that the city was deep into East Germany and that satellite TV did not even exist back then? My apologies for my boring questions

Richtfunkstrecke - a radio relay from a now demolished 332 metre high mast in Wendland, Lower Saxony. So high, because of the curvature of the earth in the 133km between the transmitter and receiving site in West Berlin.

Other masts were constructed on the West German part of the Harz mountains to connect West Berlin with the outside world, including telephone calls.



Partially demolished. The Gartow-Höhbeck transmitter site is the one in question, wich featured two masts: Gartow-1 and Gartow-2. Because there were two lines to Berlin via Gartow, with two different relay stations in Berlin as well, they needed two transmitters here. And because the Wendland was pretty much ideal, as it juts out into East Germany and is the closes point West Berlin was to the FRG, they decided to build two masts there as opposed to have another mast somewhere else.

Only Gartow-1 was demolished in 2009. Gertow-2 is still standing, but these days it isn't used much anymore. The only signals you get from there are DLF on 102.2 FM and Deutsche Telekom has LTE on there as well. It also used to carry ZDF in analogue, but with the DSO the area was coverd by surrounding transmitters from former East Germany and they decided to drop it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gartow-H%C3%B6hbeck_transmitter


The Site in the Harz mountains is called "Sender Torfhaus" and is still used by commercial radio stations FFN and Antenne Niedersachsen and by the DLF. NDR has a transmitter of their own only 800m south called "Sender Harz-West" that carries all the NDR radio stations on FM, as well as the NDR DVB-T2-Muxes. Similar to Gartow, ZDF decided to stop broadcasting from there because the signal from the transmitter on the Brocken mountain, just 6km east over the border in Saxony-Anhalt, covers the area equaly well.
WW Update, London Lite and Roger Darthwell gave kudos
WW
WW Update
Speaking of ZDF, here's the beginning of the 9 p.m. Heute from 1975 (when there was still a 9 p.m. edition of Heute ); note the brick wall and the board showing the time and day of the week in four different time zones:

RD
Roger Darthwell London London
Speaking of ZDF, here's the beginning of the 9 p.m. Heute from 1975 (when there was still a 9 p.m. edition of Heute ); note the brick wall and the board showing the time and day of the week in four different time zones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbtMASxrfHw

Nice video, but why did they have a panel showing the time in New York, Moscow, New Delhi and Tokyo?
WW
WW Update
Speaking of ZDF, here's the beginning of the 9 p.m. Heute from 1975 (when there was still a 9 p.m. edition of Heute ); note the brick wall and the board showing the time and day of the week in four different time zones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbtMASxrfHw

Nice video, but why did they have a panel showing the time in New York, Moscow, New Delhi and Tokyo?


I suppose for the same reason many news sets have a world map -- to highlight the global nature of their coverage.
WW
WW Update
From 1984, fragments from the first Heute broadcast from ZDF's new production facility in Mainz:



To be fair, most of East Germany had access to West German channels from West German txs.


Speaking of which, here's a report from ARD's Tagesthemen about the reception of West German television in East Germany; this aired in 1987, two years before the fall of the Wall:

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