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dosxuk4,465 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
Very impressive. Hope that the BBC & ITN have contingency plans & set ups as good as this.


You realise that you still need the gallery, newsroom and all the associated stuff as well as a studio to get a news bulletin on air, right? The only reason to use a presenter's house as a backup studio is when that presenter is more important than what they're presenting. The BBC and ITN have plenty of spaces in their own buildings they can use if their normal studio is out of bounds for a deep clean, without resorting to Huw Edwards' hallway.

Just think how many people would have to be involved, transporting kit and trapsing round his house to set up something like that.
Rkolsen3,161 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News
Very impressive. Hope that the BBC & ITN have contingency plans & set ups as good as this.


You realise that you still need the gallery, newsroom and all the associated stuff as well as a studio to get a news bulletin on air, right? The only reason to use a presenter's house as a backup studio is when that presenter is more important than what they're presenting. The BBC and ITN have plenty of spaces in their own buildings they can use if their normal studio is out of bounds for a deep clean, without resorting to Huw Edwards' hallway.

Just think how many people would have to be involved, transporting kit and trapsing round his house to set up something like that.


The setups have been done in an hour. After the first day of it being done remotely the presenter is doing it themselves. Someone said that the MSNBC hosts were up on satellite for a day, reportedly with a crew sitting in a truck outside and then they leave and have it setup using a LiveU. Reportedly Savannah Guthrie and Lester Holts feeds were the only ones where they didn’t appear on satellite and relied exclusively on LiveUs.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
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dosxuk4,465 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
My point is that there's still a bunch of people crowded into galleries and edit suites and control rooms and so on to make these programmes happen. You're not reducing any travel by building a studio in some presenters front room. Setting a load of kit up, even if it's only for an hour, that's still a bunch of people who didn't otherwise need to travel around and go into peoples home's, and as for having a crew sitting in a truck outside, that's even worse.

This isn't being done because studios are closing, or because there's not enough staff to run a normal service. It's being done because the networks want the optics of "look, I'm staying at home". In itself, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but don't mistake it for a contingency plan. It's extra work and extra travel at a time when we're being told not to do that.
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thegeek5,363 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
Obviously things will vary from site to site, but galleries will be being run with slimmed down crew, and, some roles moved to different rooms or even off-site. There's a lot that can be done remotely - even some functions of MCRs.
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noggin14,767 posts since 26 Jun 2001
My point is that there's still a bunch of people crowded into galleries and edit suites and control rooms and so on to make these programmes happen. You're not reducing any travel by building a studio in some presenters front room. Setting a load of kit up, even if it's only for an hour, that's still a bunch of people who didn't otherwise need to travel around and go into peoples home's, and as for having a crew sitting in a truck outside, that's even worse.

This isn't being done because studios are closing, or because there's not enough staff to run a normal service. It's being done because the networks want the optics of "look, I'm staying at home". In itself, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but don't mistake it for a contingency plan. It's extra work and extra travel at a time when we're being told not to do that.


Lots of programmes are reducing the staffing levels in their control rooms to ensure social distancing - by moving operational areas to remote locations elsewhere in the building, or even working off-site. There are a lot of remote production tools now available.

Plus shows are being simplified and crew downsized to reflect that.
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Rkolsen3,161 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News
My point is that there's still a bunch of people crowded into galleries and edit suites and control rooms and so on to make these programmes happen. You're not reducing any travel by building a studio in some presenters front room. Setting a load of kit up, even if it's only for an hour, that's still a bunch of people who didn't otherwise need to travel around and go into peoples home's, and as for having a crew sitting in a truck outside, that's even worse.

This isn't being done because studios are closing, or because there's not enough staff to run a normal service. It's being done because the networks want the optics of "look, I'm staying at home". In itself, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but don't mistake it for a contingency plan. It's extra work and extra travel at a time when we're being told not to do that.


Most of NBC News employees are now working remotely. So there is less risk of spreading. With studios shut down they don't need as many people in the building. Yes there's a crew in the control room but there are significantly less staff in the building.

If the people were showing symptoms I don't think they would be sending people into homes to setup equipment. While Craig Melvin was quarantined he was relying on his computer webcam.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
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Charles605 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World News
My point is that there's still a bunch of people crowded into galleries and edit suites and control rooms and so on to make these programmes happen. You're not reducing any travel by building a studio in some presenters front room. Setting a load of kit up, even if it's only for an hour, that's still a bunch of people who didn't otherwise need to travel around and go into peoples home's, and as for having a crew sitting in a truck outside, that's even worse.

This isn't being done because studios are closing, or because there's not enough staff to run a normal service. It's being done because the networks want the optics of "look, I'm staying at home". In itself, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but don't mistake it for a contingency plan. It's extra work and extra travel at a time when we're being told not to do that.


I don't work at NBC but another major broadcaster, and I'm surprised at how much we've been able to accomplish at home. Amazon WorkSpace has allowed us to set up any computer as a virtual company machine. It's a little sluggish, but it gets the job done.

Right now, almost all of our writers and web staff are at home. About half of our producers are at home, and the producers who are in the building just booth the newscast after them. Technical directors are coding from home, so there's only one director in the booth. Some editors are at home (and honestly their edit bays are probably safer places to be than most spots in the newsroom anyway). The only thing that we haven't been able to scale back is the photographers – they still have to go out and gather of what is still happening out in the streets. Also, everyone who is not working from home is getting a hazard pay differential, so it's not just for the on-air optics.
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trance40 posts since 2 May 2019
On optics, it's not clear to the uninitiated that Lester Holt is coming from home so I think it's more than simply optics.

Granted though, it's been made more of a big deal from most other TV shows, which is not necessarily a bad thing. Practice what you preach etc.