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Brekkie34,004 posts since 4 Jan 2003
HTV Wales Wales Today
Presumably there is a voluntary redundancy scheme in place at BBC News at the moment so even for presenters and reporters not presumably in the firing line the opportunity to move may come at a time where they'll get a pay off from the BBC to do so - and of course at the moment job security at the BBC isn't anything like it was thanks to the current political climate.
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UKnews908 posts since 26 Apr 2011
Presumably there is a voluntary redundancy scheme in place at BBC News at the moment so even for presenters and reporters not presumably in the firing line the opportunity to move may come at a time where they'll get a pay off from the BBC to do so - and of course at the moment job security at the BBC isn't anything like it was thanks to the current political climate.

That’s not how you’d work as an employer - if you know someone is gong to leave anyway (or once they’ve told you they are) you wouldn’t give them a pay off! You’ve managed to close a post without making a redundancy payment. Sometimes people will get lucky and take redundancy and time it perfectly with getting a new job, but that’s a pretty rare case. And if it’s a case of voluntary redundancy a different person might get chosen, there are a number of factors that would influence management’s decision.


I left the BBC last year - at about the same time a role in the team / department I was part of was being made redundant. I didn’t get a pay off for leaving! Neither did either of the (part time) people who’d put in for voluntary redundancy. I solved the problem for them without meaning to. (Although I’d have left to take the other role regardless.)
Last edited by UKnews on 17 February 2020 10:29pm - 3 times in total
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globaltraffic24484 posts since 23 Jun 2013
STV Central Reporting Scotland
Presumably there is a voluntary redundancy scheme in place at BBC News at the moment so even for presenters and reporters not presumably in the firing line the opportunity to move may come at a time where they'll get a pay off from the BBC to do so - and of course at the moment job security at the BBC isn't anything like it was thanks to the current political climate.

That’s not how you’d work as an employer - if you know someone is gong to leave anyway (or once they’ve told you they are) you wouldn’t give them a pay off! You’ve managed to close a post without making a redundancy payment. Sometimes people will get lucky and take redundancy and time it perfectly with getting a new job, but that’s a pretty rare case. And if it’s a case of voluntary redundancy a different person might get chosen, there are a number of factors that would influence management’s decision.


I left the BBC last year - at about the same time a role in the team / department I was part of was being made redundant. I didn’t get a pay off for leaving! Neither did either of the (part time) people who’d put in for voluntary redundancy. I solved the problem for them without meaning to. (Although I’d have left to take the other role regardless.)


Entirely depends on the situation. I found myself in a very similar scenario in a previous role. I took voluntary redundancy, well aware I had a provisional offer elsewhere. Provided you don't officially disclose the offer, and provided your new employer doesn't request a reference until you've signed your redundancy agreement, it's perfectly possible. Trust me, it's more common than you think and probably explains some of the cloak and dagger coverage of people 'rumoured' to be leaving.
radiolistener738 posts since 8 Aug 2010
Pienaar is a major loss for the BBC because he's not up his own fundament like a lot of their senior reporters.

Major gain for News UK that one.
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