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WW Update4,704 posts since 6 Feb 2007
I love absolutely everything about that video. Such a contrast from the stuffy style of presentation used by all other news bulletins back then, or even now, for that matter. And that theme tune! I do think, in some ways, we've gone backwards in the last decade or so.



Speaking of going backwards, Sky News was pretty innovative with its on-set "choreography" and camerawork in the early-to-mid naughts:

Last edited by WW Update on 14 May 2019 2:02am - 2 times in total
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thegeek4,869 posts since 1 Jan 2002
London London
I love absolutely everything about that video. Such a contrast from the stuffy style of presentation used by all other news bulletins back then, or even now, for that matter. And that theme tune! I do think, in some ways, we've gone backwards in the last decade or so.



Speaking of going backwards, Sky News was pretty innovative with its on-set "choreography" and camerawork in the early-to-mid naughts:
polecam, anyone?
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Woodpecker430 posts since 19 Jan 2018
Central (West) Midlands Today
I love absolutely everything about that video. Such a contrast from the stuffy style of presentation used by all other news bulletins back then, or even now, for that matter. And that theme tune! I do think, in some ways, we've gone backwards in the last decade or so.



Speaking of going backwards, Sky News was pretty innovative with its on-set "choreography" and camerawork in the early-to-mid naughts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM6nBNLMS0s


I remember that! I do think that era of Sky News Today was, presentationally, probably the best they’ve ever put out, back when they really were trailblazers. I always thought it went a bit downhill once they introduced the three-presenter format in 2005.

Indeed, there really isn’t any comparison between the above and what they do now. It feels like they’re plodding along in a lot of ways - I think the only programme that is really any different is that of Kay Burley.

I just think it’s sad that they’ve gone from having a vibrant, working newsroom set to a bland glass cube and a semi-virtual studio that wouldn’t look out of place on regional news. In fact, I think the two main sets are the first in Sky News’ history not to back on to the newsroom or gallery in any way.

Anyway, I’m rambling on now. I often wonder whether it was this that paved the way for the style you see on outlets such as Franceinfo and The Nine.
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WW Update4,704 posts since 6 Feb 2007
Speaking of odd -- or way ahead of its time -- this 1970s newscast from Indiana is truly something else:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qTfl7AEdHg

That's a beauty. Always thought CityTV in Canada got the credit for that style of news presentation.



By the way, WTHR's revolutionary look did not last long. By 1980, the station had adopted a more conventional format (but the old music stayed for a while):

Mouseboy332,621 posts since 10 Feb 2014
Used to be a CityPulse truck before the buyout happened and it was the ChumCity Building. The tires used to spin and smoke use to come out. If you are a tv nerd it was a facinating place to visit. Because almost every window had something going on and all you had to do was walk up and look inside. Or they would be right out in the pavement shooting something.
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WW Update4,704 posts since 6 Feb 2007
Or they would be right out in the pavement shooting something.



In the 1990s, CIVT (branded as VTV) in Vancouver "borrowed" many elements from CityTV's approach, even though it was owned by a different company. In this 1998 clip, their morning show is being broadcast from a sidewalk in front of their building:



The station is now a (far more conventional) CTV affiliate.
Mouseboy332,621 posts since 10 Feb 2014
CityNews (CityPulse) placed a emphasis on natural sound for each story. This practice, whilst many others have fallen by the wayside in recent years continues. Typically the as the presenter moves on to the next story, they will pause as the b-roll plays and the natural sound only plays. And if there was a video shot taken from the Tower Cams it even included natural sound from across the city. Which was very unusual. This sound "technique" was followed by an actual timestamp shown on screen when the video was taken. Also they often made sure, if possible to get a shot of the newsvan or live truck in the shot on the scene of the story. This subconsciously implanted in the mind of the viewer that the station was indeed " Everywhere" and it was a brilliant marketing tool, as the channel logo was continusoly on screen from the mic flags, vehicles and of course the graphics. The ethos of CityNews (CityPulse) was "A Day in The Life Of Toronto" so the natural sound and timestamp was one unique "City" techniques that was often overlooked by imitators.

Last edited by Mouseboy33 on 14 May 2019 7:53pm - 2 times in total
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Charles570 posts since 11 Nov 2009
BBC World
One thing that I find unusual, but also effective on occasion, is having a presenter look down a different camera to the outputting camera. I see it quite often on France 24 after the end of a report, and it looks like CBS has done it on occasion as well heading into breaks and at the end of the Overnight News.



This practice is common in France as well as well as several other French-speaking and/or French-influenced countries.

Here's a typical example from France 2:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-M0yJEt2JGw&t=83

And here's an example from Morocco, a former French colony:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stTQXNl9uwQ&t=861


Something that is so French and found nowhere else: cutting to a wide studio shot for a half second with the anchor still looking at the other camera while coming in and out of sound or a PKG. I can't think of anywhere else that does this to quite the same extent, and there must be some quirky historical reason why French broadcasters adopted this practice. It doesn't seem to have much of a purpose other than for aesthetics, though I do quite like it. Though whenever I tell directors here in the U.S. that it's common practice on French television, they think it sounds crazy and completely superfluous!

Something that's also so uniquely French is having a studio guest, showing a shot of them in the headlines before the open, and the presenter reading a tease before saying a very brief bonjour/bonsoir to the guest.
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