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Rkolsen3,166 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News

I think key presenters and reporters have had ISDN lines for a long time. Andrew Giligan's fatefull 2003 report on R4's Today was made via ISDN I recall.

However, I suspect many are/will be connecting via their domestic DSL Internet connections these days. I think BT cease new ISDN installs very soon?

I forget how is an ISDN Line any different from a DSL and a generic phone line. DSL is a relic here in most of the US, my family had it from like 97–2001 before switching to Cable. All I remember is that for DSL we had to add filters on every phone jack and connected the phone line to an external modem.

VDSL is still pretty common in the UK - cable is by no means universal.
I found a couple of dozen microfilters in my garage today. I think they've been breeding.


I forget do they require separate installation from the phone company or could they set up the lines using the filters as needed? I ask as I remember sometimes during sports events local radio stations use ISDN boxes and have broadcast from the hotel rooms. I doubt the hotel rooms and their private system offer ISDN lines to the room
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
noggin14,772 posts since 26 Jun 2001

Do these presenters typically have ISDN lines or were they setup? If they were setup would it be reasonable to ask the BBC to pay for them as it’s used for work?


I think key presenters and reporters have had ISDN lines for a long time. Andrew Giligan's fatefull 2003 report on R4's Today was made via ISDN I recall.

However, I suspect many are/will be connecting via their domestic DSL Internet connections these days. I think BT cease new ISDN installs very soon?

I forget how is an ISDN Line any different from a DSL and a generic phone line.

ISDN is not hugely different in physical cable terms to a regular phone line AIUI (it may take more twisted pairs) - but in connection technology it is VERY different to ADSL/VDSL/Cable.

ISDN provides 2 x 64kbps data connections. Very low bitrate compared to ADSL, VDSL, DOCSIS and the FTTP systems - BUT it is circuit switched not packet switched. It works very similarly to a regular phone line. Each ISDN line has a 'phone number' and so you dial-up an ISDN circuit to make a connection between two places. Once that connection is established you have a full-speed circuit switched connection between the two (*) with no contention, no packet loss, no drop out. It's a very sensible solution for voice connectivity - and is so ubiquitous here pretty much any broadcast TV or Radio outlet will be able to cope with it for audio.

The data isn't 'internet' - it's point to point (in the same way connecting two computers directly via dial up would be).

(*) HOWEVER some ISDN providers are now using IP connectivity to route traffic between their ISDN subscribers...

Quote:

DSL is a relic here in most of the US, my family had it from like 97–2001 before switching to Cable. All I remember is that for DSL we had to add filters on every phone jack and connected the phone line to an external modem.


AIUI from friends who live in the US and Canada - it's only a relic in urban and suburban areas. If you are in rural areas that don't get cable - then ADSL or Satellite are the only real options (with some wireless connectivity also in some areas)

British Telecom were planning to replace the local copper phone loop to the exchange with fibre in the 80s, but commercially that only made sense if they could also offer TV services (effectively becoming a telephony and cable TV operator). The government of the day, under Margaret Thatcher, saw that as a monopoly-in-the-making so veto-ed it. We could have been ahead of everyone else (fibre can be repurposed many times with new fibre technologies - the expensive bit is rolling out the cable) but are now miles behind the rest of Europe.

In the UK we continue to push our twisted pair phone line further and further. ADSL2+ is the minimum offering (max of 24Mbs - but often much lower), VDSL (offering around 70Mbs max) and VDSL with G.Fast (offering up to 300Mbs) are the fastest connectivity over a regular phone line. VDSL requires cabinet based DSL interfaces close to properties, ADSL keeps them at the exchange. Confusingly VDSL is often described as 'fibre', just as Virgin's coax DOCSIS cable-based systems are... (The Fibre doesn't reach your home)


In Europe - because cable (which is usually coax based and can support high download speeds of 30Mbs-1Gbs but only modest upload speeds <100Mbs) hasn't been universally rolled out (and thus there isn't an existing coax cable buried infrastructure) a lot of countries have jumped directly to fibre. in Portugal ~50% of broadband connections to domestic homes are now fibre FTTP/FTTH. In Sweden almost every town has fibre networks installed by the local council that are then leased to broadband providers.

In the UK FTTP/FTTH is only really available in new build housing developments and apartments or in rural towns and villages that have successfully organised a critical number of subscribers to make it worth a company installing fibre infrastructure (with some government support)
2
UKnews and thegeek gave kudos
noggin14,772 posts since 26 Jun 2001
I forget how is an ISDN Line any different from a DSL and a generic phone line. DSL is a relic here in most of the US, my family had it from like 97–2001 before switching to Cable. All I remember is that for DSL we had to add filters on every phone jack and connected the phone line to an external modem.

VDSL is still pretty common in the UK - cable is by no means universal.
I found a couple of dozen microfilters in my garage today. I think they've been breeding.


I forget do they require separate installation from the phone company or could they set up the lines using the filters as needed? I ask as I remember sometimes during sports events local radio stations use ISDN boxes and have broadcast from the hotel rooms. I doubt the hotel rooms and their private system offer ISDN lines to the room


ISDN in the UK is a separate install. I'd be amazed if hotel phone exchanges allowed for ISDN interfacing and call routing - though it is possible to use a regular phone to dial into an ISDN modem in some cases (where it behaves as a TBU I believe). However if the broadcaster is a regular user of ISDN it's entirely possible that the hotel has the ability to patch an RJ11 or RJ45 socket in a room to an incoming ISDN line - allowing ISDN paid for by the broadcaster to be routed to a specific room's socket manually?

(In the UK we'd use a regular UK phone socket connection for ISDN - which aren't RJ11s - though often hotel phone systems use RJ11s or RJ45s)
Markymark7,811 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today
BT are (or were) I think about to cease analogue provision on new install copper phone lines from this April, with a view to migrating all current voice lines (20 million) to a VoIP system by 2025. In short you'll need to plug your phone into a phone port on a suitable ADSL or VDSL router, or use a separate adaptor box, or not bother any more with an analogue voice line (which will be an option at last)

Further reading
https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2018/12/openreach-start-sogea-pilot-and-reveal-standalone-broadband-prices.html
dosxuk4,470 posts since 22 Oct 2005
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
VDSL is still pretty common in the UK - cable is by no means universal.
I found a couple of dozen microfilters in my garage today. I think they've been breeding.


I forget do they require separate installation from the phone company or could they set up the lines using the filters as needed? I ask as I remember sometimes during sports events local radio stations use ISDN boxes and have broadcast from the hotel rooms. I doubt the hotel rooms and their private system offer ISDN lines to the room


ISDN in the UK is a separate install. I'd be amazed if hotel phone exchanges allowed for ISDN interfacing and call routing - though it is possible to use a regular phone to dial into an ISDN modem in some cases (where it behaves as a TBU I believe). However if the broadcaster is a regular user of ISDN it's entirely possible that the hotel has the ability to patch an RJ11 or RJ45 socket in a room to an incoming ISDN line - allowing ISDN paid for by the broadcaster to be routed to a specific room's socket manually?

(In the UK we'd use a regular UK phone socket connection for ISDN - which aren't RJ11s - though often hotel phone systems use RJ11s or RJ45s)


When the venue I was based in at the time was used for something needing an ISDN line, BT would use a line they'd put in next to our comms racks in the basement and then patch it through our structured cabling and then put an adaptor on at the chosen RJ45 socket upstairs. I can see hotels doing exactly the same.
Markymark7,811 posts since 13 Dec 2004
Meridian (North) South Today

I forget do they require separate installation from the phone company or could they set up the lines using the filters as needed? I ask as I remember sometimes during sports events local radio stations use ISDN boxes and have broadcast from the hotel rooms. I doubt the hotel rooms and their private system offer ISDN lines to the room


ISDN in the UK is a separate install. I'd be amazed if hotel phone exchanges allowed for ISDN interfacing and call routing - though it is possible to use a regular phone to dial into an ISDN modem in some cases (where it behaves as a TBU I believe). However if the broadcaster is a regular user of ISDN it's entirely possible that the hotel has the ability to patch an RJ11 or RJ45 socket in a room to an incoming ISDN line - allowing ISDN paid for by the broadcaster to be routed to a specific room's socket manually?

(In the UK we'd use a regular UK phone socket connection for ISDN - which aren't RJ11s - though often hotel phone systems use RJ11s or RJ45s)


When the venue I was based in at the time was used for something needing an ISDN line, BT would use a line they'd put in next to our comms racks in the basement and then patch it through our structured cabling and then put an adaptor on at the chosen RJ45 socket upstairs. I can see hotels doing exactly the same.


Yes. Mind you I stayed in the Hilton in Cairo about 10 years ago, and to provide the internet in each room, they had taken the existing twisted pair for each room's telephone, and stuck an ADSL service on each one. So every room was like a domestic dwelling, with a filter dongle for the phone, and a modem with a single LAN port to plug into.

300 rooms

Nuts!
Rkolsen3,166 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News
Don't Sky News' tech team make heavy use of Mac Minis, Raspberry Pis, and the SRT protocol to make this kind of thing happen over consumer-grade internet lines and 4G?

Yes, some of it is pretty ingenious. You can follow what they do @NewsTech on Twitter. Surprised a bit they haven’t relied on some of the tehcnolpgy and corporate software solutions NBC has.

Also is it possible for Sky employees who work at home to tune into a private satellite signal using their Sky Box to authenticate it? They could easily distribute there multiviewers, news source feeds to employees. All I think would involve would be launching on satellite and having it as a private channel.

I know the cable companies here in the US use special channels that aren’t in the guide for employees to test or distribute messages.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
Rkolsen3,166 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World News
For a multiviewer, wouldnt you get better latency with IP than satellite? Guess it depends on the home users connection.

For the people at home latency wouldn’t matter, they just need to be able to view sources. People at home won’t be switching the programs.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.