« Topics
12
Worzel4,539 posts since 8 Jan 2008
Anglia (West) Look East (West sub-opt)
I've always wondered why UK weather forecasts (or even regional forecasts) always stand on the left of the screen with the map on the right (BBC Two forecasts aside!)?

Is it because it generally looks better or is there some special reason?

Other than the BBC Two forecasts, have any other UK broadcasters swapped things around at any time in the past?
Last edited by Worzel on 9 April 2019 9:49pm
Critique3,147 posts since 9 Aug 2009
Anglia (East) Look East
Until fairly recently South East Today used to do an awkward thing where they would start stood on the left as normal but have to walk across to the right as they preferred to put the map on the left for some reason! Didn't seem that they could move the position of the BBC Weather globe at the start of the titles (nor just the logo after the Met Office went), as otherwise they could have done it all from one side. Last time I watched they'd given up and were just doing it from the left, but not sure if that was as the forecast was being done by one of the London-based forecasters?

EDIT: Just checked tonight's programme on iPlayer and the BBC Weather logo is now on the opposite side (the left) for the start but the rest of the forecast is as normal, so the presenter has to dart across the screen for all of five seconds of the graphics being the opposite way round?!
623058: it just seems like your an mp3 whore
Neil Jones5,129 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
TV-am started off with some now strange looking maps that were full-screen:

(from 7:45 video time)

They later scrapped this (and pretty much everything else really) and soon did the weather like this on a rotating cube which IIRC always on the right as we see it, but you can see the actual weather graphics are still the same:


By 1990, a more traditional approach (later in different colours):
Neil Jones5,129 posts since 23 Dec 2001
Central (West) Midlands Today
I was waiting for the TV:AM weather presenter to be hit in the back by that rotating box!


I wonder how that was controlled, she steps forward pretty much on cue to get it to rotate. There's no clicker like you see on modern forecasts so presumably there may have been a button or a sensor she'd have to stand on to rotate the cube? Or maybe it was just manually controlled and the step forward was the cue to rotate it.

It was certainly different.
dvboy9,707 posts since 11 Jan 2003
Central (West) Midlands Today
To go back to the original question I think just because of the shape of the UK it generally means you can have Ireland hidden behind your left shoulder as Ulkrika demonstrates well. That said, it's not unknown for the presenter to switch sides when describing weather coming from the west.

For regional forecasts it probably doesn't matter but the maps are generally off centre to the right, and it's nowadays how presenters are trained and what they are used to.
Rkolsen2,602 posts since 20 Jan 2014
BBC World
It could just be something as simple as the way the maps laid out and a more effective use of space. The UK on maps is a really tall country (on TV) with Northern Ireland to the left of it. If the presenter stood on the right there would be some empty area on screen.

Also it frequently happens over here as well.
Don’t let anyone treat you like you’re a VO/SOT when you’re a PKG.
Andrew13,478 posts since 27 Mar 2001
Yorkshire Look North (Yorkshire)
I was waiting for the TV:AM weather presenter to be hit in the back by that rotating box!


I wonder how that was controlled, she steps forward pretty much on cue to get it to rotate. There's no clicker like you see on modern forecasts so presumably there may have been a button or a sensor she'd have to stand on to rotate the cube? Or maybe it was just manually controlled and the step forward was the cue to rotate it.

It was certainly different.

A sensor in 1983?
There was obviously a bloke behind it moving it round!
Inspector Sands13,396 posts since 25 Aug 2004
Possibly also to do with the way that the prevaling weather here normally comes from the west? If the presenter stands on the left they can gesture this with a pushing motion rather than pulling across which looks more awkward?


One more obvious reason could be that if they stood on the right they'd cover up northern France and the Benelux (and now in 16:9 days, Denmark too) although they're not part of the UK, people do go there and of course the BBC has been available in The Netherlands for many years. Of course that means obscuring Ireland but only partially
Last edited by Inspector Sands on 10 April 2019 8:09am - 3 times in total
noggin14,216 posts since 26 Jun 2001
Possibly also to do with the way that the prevaling weather here normally comes from the west? If the presenter stands on the left they can gesture this with a pushing motion rather than pulling across which looks more awkward?


One more obvious reason could be that if they stood on the right they'd cover up northern France and the Benelux (and now in 16:9 days, Denmark too) although they're not part of the UK, people do go there and of course the BBC has been available in The Netherlands for many years. Of course that means obscuring Ireland but only partially


Yes - if they stand on the left of frame they are only covering up the Atlantic, whereas if they stand on the right of frame they are likely to cover Benelux countries (where BBC One and Two have been legally available for a long time)