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BBI45867 posts since 2 Aug 2015
Central (East) East Midlands Today
I was recently watching a clip of Te Karere from New Zealand, and it got me thinking, how many news programmes are there that are broadcast in minority languages. I was able to think of Te Karere (Maori), Telesguard (Romansch), and then Newyddion (Welsh) and An La (Scottish Gaelic).




What other programmes could fit this category?
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WW Update4,837 posts since 6 Feb 2007
Pick a country in Europe and chances are pretty good that it has news programming in minority languages.

Italy's RAI, for instance, produces news in German for South Tyrol:



And in Slovenian for Friuli-Venezia Giulia:

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WW Update4,837 posts since 6 Feb 2007

Nuacht RTE and Nuacht TG4 are very popular still in Ireland, a country which is immensely proud of their ancient language.


If the Irish are genuinely proud of their ancient language (as they should be), they should begin using it as their primary language of communication. (Sorry, this is a pet peeve of mine.)
whoiam989883 posts since 22 Dec 2007
BBC World News
Maybe it's time to call out some Hebrew experts who have successfully revived (modern) Hebrew into an everyday language.

Staying on topic, NRK in Norway, SVT in Sweden, and Yle in Finland jointly produce Sámi language news bulletin titled Ođđasat , presented from a studio of NRK.



Each episode usually lasts for 15 minutes. But this summer, the programme is in the summer mode, as its time length is reduced to around 4 minutes, and Yle's production team is taking a break until mid-August.
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chinamug456 posts since 29 Jul 2013
UTV Newsline

Nuacht RTE and Nuacht TG4 are very popular still in Ireland, a country which is immensely proud of their ancient language.


I'm afraid that's not the case. Nuacht RTE has an advantage as it's broadcast just before 6pm so viewership picks up as you get closer to the Six-One. Nuacht TG4 has viewing figures in the thousands. Before TG4 started RTE used to try to schedule it where it would do the least damage to viewing figures. Something they still do today. I remember the only reason college mates of mine watched it back in the 90's was that Sharon Ni Bheolain was presenting. Otherwise, it was an automatic switch over to any other station.
davidhorman2,243 posts since 8 Mar 2005
Channel Channel Islands

If the Irish are genuinely proud of their ancient language (as they should be), they should begin using it as their primary language of communication. (Sorry, this is a pet peeve of mine.)


I'm sure "they" all would if "they" all spoke it.

Would you insist that someone who loved classic cars could only drive classic cars?

I'm not entirely clear on what you're peeved about.
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The SNT Three850 posts since 17 Sep 2005
Anglia (East) Look East
Maybe it's time to call out some Hebrew experts who have successfully revived (modern) Hebrew into an everyday language.

Staying on topic, NRK in Norway, SVT in Sweden, and Yle in Finland jointly produce Sámi language news bulletin titled Ođđasat , presented from a studio of NRK.


And also using a variation of NRK's news titles/graphics (which, incidentally, I love) - full showreel here.
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WW Update4,837 posts since 6 Feb 2007

If the Irish are genuinely proud of their ancient language (as they should be), they should begin using it as their primary language of communication. (Sorry, this is a pet peeve of mine.)


I'm sure "they" all would if "they" all spoke it.

Would you insist that someone who loved classic cars could only drive classic cars?

I'm not entirely clear on what you're peeved about.


My point is that a country that is "immensely proud" of its language should use it as a primary means of communication. As whoiam989 pointed out, Israel managed to bring Hebrew back from the dead and make it its primary language, so there's no reason why Ireland couldn't do the same.

Or look at the Dutch: Almost all of them speak English, but they still use Dutch to communicate with each other.
chinamug456 posts since 29 Jul 2013
UTV Newsline

If the Irish are genuinely proud of their ancient language (as they should be), they should begin using it as their primary language of communication. (Sorry, this is a pet peeve of mine.)


I'm sure "they" all would if "they" all spoke it.

Would you insist that someone who loved classic cars could only drive classic cars?

I'm not entirely clear on what you're peeved about.


My point is that a country that is "immensely proud" of its language should use it as a primary means of communication. As whoiam989 pointed out, Israel managed to bring Hebrew back from the dead and make it its primary language, so there's no reason why Ireland couldn't do the same.

Or look at the Dutch: Almost all of them speak English, but they still use Dutch to communicate with each other.



I don't think Ireland is "immensely proud" of anything to be honest. Ireland may be proud of many parts of it's culture but for every person that's proud of something Irish, there will be another Irish person that will have an objection that may or may not be legitimate. In other words a fairly normal Western European country. The only Countries that tend to be "immensely proud" of anything are usually those that are insecure, such as North Korea or the USA Very Happy