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clh53 posts since 10 Jul 2014
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Reith seems to have equally spaced numerals, but for some reason on BBC Weather's website they don't and are tightly together. It doesn't happen anywhere else on the BBC website. Wonder why they've done this for Weather only as space certainly isn't the reason.


I'd imagine there's a fixed width version for numbers at least, though maybe it's not available as a web font

You'd need it for things like clocks to stop the numbers appearing to jump around due to different width characters.
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PFMC841,529 posts since 28 Feb 2013
UTV Newsline
The version for download on the BBC website doesn't have the issue, and on other web pages the numbers are equally spaced to stop this, it's only the Weather page that suffers from this.

On many clocks, scoreboards etc. you see on TV these days have the numbers jumping around, especially when there's 1's involved.
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mdtauk6,299 posts since 4 Jan 2003
London London
Reith seems to have equally spaced numerals, but for some reason on BBC Weather's website they don't and are tightly together. It doesn't happen anywhere else on the BBC website. Wonder why they've done this for Weather only as space certainly isn't the reason.

By default it uses Tabular figures, but it supports OpenType proportional ones, using a stylistic set
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Rich Tea476 posts since 16 Apr 2017
Anglia (West) Look East
Here's something very interesting that I did not realise until I saw this met office tweet. Today is the 70th anniversary of the first televised weather forecast on Friday 29th July 1949. I must admit it surprised me as I always had in mind some date around about 1954 for some reason, and then I read this comment elsewhere - "The BBC transmitted its first weather chart at the start of a trial series in November 1936. BBC Television closed down during the Second World War but, in July 1949, it began broadcasting weather maps with captions again. On 11 January 1954, it put out the first live weather forecast from Lime Grove Studios in London."



South Today2,736 posts since 10 Feb 2003
I noticed tonight that the Weather from Granada has Whaley Bridge added onto the map - which is a nice touch!


They normally label somewhere in the Peak District, don't they? (Buxton or Glossop, possibly?)

I presume that Whaley Bridge was instead of that?


Helen Plint even put it on the map on the Sunday evening forecast for Central West.
bilky asko5,483 posts since 9 Sep 2006
Tyne Tees Look North (North East)
Granada certainly used to put fairly random place names on their map rather than the bigger towns and cities.


Yorkshire and Tyne Tees in the late 90s and early 00s often used to pick two places with an amusing connection. Hilderthorpe and Ogden as an example springs to mind.


And the Bob Johnson forecasts for Tyne Tees had the anagram and the initials of the places spelling things out.
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